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Alexander Brazenor

Alex BrazenorPhD Candidate

 

Location:George Fisher Research Building DB32-113
Phone: +61 7 4781 5859
Email: alexander.brazenor@my.jcu.edu.au

 

Biography

My love for biological sciences began whilst watching David Attenborough documentaries when I was young. This interest was furthered by undertaking an undergraduate degree in Marine Biology at JCU in 2008. It was during this time that I took a class with Associate Professor David Blair who piqued my interest in parasites and, upon asking him about possible Honours projects, I was directed to Dr Kate Hutson in the Centre for Sustainable Tropical Fisheries and Aquaculture. It did not take much convincing to have me sign up for an Honours degree. My Honours year in 2011 fostered the curiosity I had for marine parasitology and helped me clarify where my specific interests lay; in the study of parasite species that infect commercially important finfish species. This led me to begin a PhD in August 2012 under the supervision of Kate Hutson and Guy Carton.

My PhD is focussed on investigating the impact of the harmful ectoparasite Neobenedenia sp. on farmed barramundi. The results obtained in this thesis will make a significant contribution to our knowledge about Neobenedenia spp. found around Australia, the life cycle, biology, behaviour, and host-parasite interactions of species of Neobenedenia found infecting fishes in northern Queensland.

Research Interests

My research interests include parasite-host interactions, treatments of parasites infecting commercially important finfish species, and the development of more sustainable and environmentally friendly options for managing parasite infections in finfish aquaculture. The improvement in these areas of research can result in the vast improvement of aquaculture practices. The taxonomic work I conducted in my Honours year on Lernanthropus latis, a parasitic gill copepod, piqued my interest in the description of parasite species. Although no work is being performed in this field for my PhD, this still remains a research interest.

 

PhD Project

Response of Neobenedenia sp. to environmental changes and the physiological impact of infection on its fish host

Supervisors: Dr Kate S. Hutson and Dr Guy A. Carton

 

Recent Research Projects

  • 2010/521 FRDC-DCCEE: “Vulnerability of an iconic Australian finfish (barramundi, Lates calcarifer) and related industries to altered climate across tropical Australia”
  • Vulnerability of barramundi to climate change: Vulnerability of an iconic Australian finfish (barramundi – Lates calcarifer) and aligned industries to climate change across tropical Australia (2013). Dean R. Jerry, Carolyn Smith-Keune, Lauren Hodgson, Igor Pirozzi, A. Guy Carton, Kate S. Hutson, Alexander K. Brazenor, Alejandro Trujillo Gonzalez, Stephen Gamble, Geoff Collins and Jeremy VanDerWal.

 

Publications

Theses:

Brazenor, A.K (2011). Life cycles of Lernanthropus latis (Copepoda) and Neobenedenia sp. (Monogenea) infecting barramundi (Lates calcarifer): The impact of current and predicted climates. Honours thesis, James Cook University pp. 113.

 

Conference presentations:

Brazenor, AK & Hutson, KS (2013). Effects of temperature and salinity on the life cycle of Neobenedenia sp. (Monogenea: Capsalidae) infecting farmed barramundi (Lates calcarifer). Oral presentation in the Fisheries Research and Development Corporation (FRDC) Australasian Scientific Conference on Aquatic Animal Health, 8-12th July 2013, Cairns, Queensland, Australia. (This presentation was awarded second prize for Outstanding Student Presentation at the FRDC Australasian Scientific Conference on Aquatic Animal Health in Cairns, Australia)

Brazenor AK & Hutson, KS. (2012). Effects of temperature and salinity on the life cycle of Neobenedenia sp. infecting farmed barramundi (Lates calcarifer). Oral presentation in the 2012 Australian Society of Parasitology Annual Conference. 2-5th July, 2012. Launceston, Tasmania.

Brazenor, AK Hutson, KS (2011). The Life Cycle of Lernanthropus latis – an emerging parasite in the aquaculture of Lates calcarifer. Oral presentation in the 2011 Australian Society of Parasitology Annual Conference. 10-13th July, 2011. Cairns.

 

Publications:

Brazenor, A.K. & Hutson, K.S. (2013). Effect of temperature and salinity on egg hatching and description of the life cycle of Lernanthropus latis (Copepoda: Lernanthropidae) infecting barramundi, Lates calcarifer. Parasitology International 62: 437 – 447.

Jerry, DR, Smith-Keune, C, Hodgson, L, Pirozzi, I, Carton, AG, Hutson, KS, Brazenor, AK, Trujillo-Gonzalez, A, Gamble, S, Collins, G & VanDerWal, J. (2013). 2010/521-Vulnerability of barramundi to climate change: Vulnerability of an iconic Australian finfish (barramundi – Lates calcarifer) and aligned industries to climate change across tropical Australia.

 

In review:

Brazenor, AK & Hutson, KS (2014). Effects of temperature and salinity on the life cycle of Neobenedenia sp. infecting farmed barramundi (Lates calcarifer). Parasitology Research (in review).

 

Grants

2014 James Cook University Graduate Research Award 2014 ($1,500)

2013 Second prize for outstanding student presentation at the 2013 FRDC Australasian Scientific Conference on Aquatic Animal Health

2013 Australian Society for Parasitology travel award ($2,885)

2012 Australian Postgraduate Award ($23,641/year)

2011 National Climate Change Adaptation Research Facility. A $5,000 National Climate Change Adaptation Research Facility Marine Adaptation Network Honours and Masters Research Support Grant awarded to A.K. Brazenor.


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