Data from: Maternal effects and Symbiodinium community composition drive differential patterns in juvenile survival in the coral Acropora tenuis

Raw data and statistical analysis to evaluate parental effects on larval survivorship, larval weight, settlement success and juvenile survivorship.

Abstract [Related Publication]: Coral endosymbionts in the dinoflagellate genus Symbiodinium are known to impact host physiology and have led to the evolution of reef-building, but less is known about how symbiotic communities in early life-history stages and their interactions with host parental identity shape the structure of coral communities on reefs. Differentiating the roles of environmental and biological factors driving variation in population demographic processes, particularly larval settlement, early juvenile survival and the onset of symbiosis is key to understanding how coral communities are structured and to predicting how they are likely to respond to climate change. We show that maternal effects (that here include genetic and/or effects related to the maternal environment) can explain nearly 24% of variation in larval settlement success and 5–17% of variation in juvenile survival in an experimental study of the reef-building scleractinian coral, Acropora tenuis. After 25 days on the reef, Symbiodinium communities associated with juvenile corals differed significantly between high mortality and low mortality families based on estimates of taxonomic richness, composition and relative abundance of taxa. Our results highlight that maternal and familial effects significantly explain variation in juvenile survival and symbiont communities in a broadcast-spawning coral, with Symbiodinium type A3 possibly a critical symbiotic partner during this early life stage.

The full methodology is available in the Open Access publication from the Related Publications link below.

 

    Data Record Details
    Data record related to this publication Data from: Maternal effects and Symbiodinium community composition drive differential patterns in juvenile survival in the coral Acropora tenuis
    Data Publication title Data from: Maternal effects and Symbiodinium community composition drive differential patterns in juvenile survival in the coral Acropora tenuis
  • Description

    Raw data and statistical analysis to evaluate parental effects on larval survivorship, larval weight, settlement success and juvenile survivorship.

    Abstract [Related Publication]: Coral endosymbionts in the dinoflagellate genus Symbiodinium are known to impact host physiology and have led to the evolution of reef-building, but less is known about how symbiotic communities in early life-history stages and their interactions with host parental identity shape the structure of coral communities on reefs. Differentiating the roles of environmental and biological factors driving variation in population demographic processes, particularly larval settlement, early juvenile survival and the onset of symbiosis is key to understanding how coral communities are structured and to predicting how they are likely to respond to climate change. We show that maternal effects (that here include genetic and/or effects related to the maternal environment) can explain nearly 24% of variation in larval settlement success and 5–17% of variation in juvenile survival in an experimental study of the reef-building scleractinian coral, Acropora tenuis. After 25 days on the reef, Symbiodinium communities associated with juvenile corals differed significantly between high mortality and low mortality families based on estimates of taxonomic richness, composition and relative abundance of taxa. Our results highlight that maternal and familial effects significantly explain variation in juvenile survival and symbiont communities in a broadcast-spawning coral, with Symbiodinium type A3 possibly a critical symbiotic partner during this early life stage.

    The full methodology is available in the Open Access publication from the Related Publications link below.

     

  • Other Descriptors
    • Descriptor

      This dataset is available from Dryad in comma-separated values (.csv) format and R script. Dryad data package: Quigley KM, Willis BL, Bay LK (2016) Data from: Maternal effects and Symbiodinium community composition drive differential patterns in juvenile survival in the coral Acropora tenuis. Dryad Digital Repository. https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.8b5g6

    • Descriptor type Note
  • Data type dataset
  • Keywords
    • Symbiodinium
    • settlement
    • juvenile
    • survivorship
    • maternal effects
    • coral reefs
    • ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies
  • Funding source
  • Research grant(s)/Scheme name(s)
  • Research themes
    Tropical Ecosystems, Conservation and Climate Change
    FoR Codes (*)
    • 060205 - Marine and Estuarine Ecology (incl. Marine Ichthyology)
    SEO Codes
    • 970106 - Expanding Knowledge in the Biological Sciences
    Specify spatial or temporal setting of the data
    Temporal (time) coverage
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  • End Date
  • Time Period
    Spatial (location) coverage
  • Locations
    Data Locations

    Type Location Notes
    URL https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.8b5g6
    The Data Manager is: Kate Quigley
    College or Centre
    Access conditions Open
  • Alternative access conditions
  • Data record size 10 files: 134.45 KB
  • Related publications
      Name Quigley, Kate M., Willis, Bette L., and Bay, Line K. (2016) Maternal effects and Symbiodinium community composition drive differential patterns in juvenile survival in the coral Acropora tenuis. Royal Society Open Science, 3. pp. 1-17.
    • URL https://doi.org/10.1098/rsos.160471
    • Notes Open Access
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    Citation Quigley, Kate; Willis, Bette; Bay, Line (2016): Data from: Maternal effects and Symbiodinium community composition drive differential patterns in juvenile survival in the coral Acropora tenuis. James Cook University.