Effects of elevated CO2, diel CO2 cycles, and elevated temperature on metabolic traits in a reef fish

This data set contains data collected by Taryn Laubenstein of James Cook University in 2017 dealing with the effects of stable and diel-cycling elevated CO2, as well as elevated temperature, on the physiological performance of juvenile spiny damselfish, Acanthochromis polyacanthus.

    Data Record Details
    Data record related to this publication Effects of elevated CO2, diel CO2 cycles, and elevated temperature on metabolic traits in a reef fish
    Data Publication title Effects of elevated CO2, diel CO2 cycles, and elevated temperature on metabolic traits in a reef fish
  • Description

    This data set contains data collected by Taryn Laubenstein of James Cook University in 2017 dealing with the effects of stable and diel-cycling elevated CO2, as well as elevated temperature, on the physiological performance of juvenile spiny damselfish, Acanthochromis polyacanthus.

  • Other Descriptors
    • Descriptor

      This data set contains physiological responses of juvenile spiny damselfish from an experiment which investigated the effects of stable and diel-cycling elevated CO2 and temperature on the juvenile stage of a coral reef fish. The physiological metrics consisted of metabolic traits, i.e. resting and maximal oxygen uptake rates, and aerobic scope, and were measured using an intermittent flow respirometry system. The experiments were conducted at the National Sea Simulator (SeaSim) facility at the Australian Institute of Marine Science (AIMS) (Cape Cleveland, Australia). The fish were collected in July 2015 and experiments were conducted in April - November 2017.

      The full methodology is available in the accompanying publication, "Beneficial effects of diel CO2 cycles on reef fish metabolic performance are diminished under elevated temperature".

       

    • Descriptor type Full
    • Descriptor

      "NA" in the data indicates data not obtained (e.g. pump failure)

    • Descriptor type Note
    • Descriptor

      This dataset is available as a spreadsheet saved in both MS Excel (.xlsx) and Open Document (.ods) formats.

    • Descriptor type Note
  • Data type dataset
  • Keywords
    • climate change
    • physiology
    • CO2 cycles
    • elevated temperature
  • Funding source
  • Research grant(s)/Scheme name(s)
  • Research themes
    Tropical Ecosystems, Conservation and Climate Change
    FoR Codes (*)
    • 060306 - Evolutionary Impacts of Climate Change
    • 069902 - Global Change Biology
    SEO Codes
    • 960399 - Climate and Climate Change not elsewhere classified
    Specify spatial or temporal setting of the data
    Temporal (time) coverage
  • Start Date
  • End Date
  • Time Period
    Spatial (location) coverage
  • Locations
    • Experiments conducted at the National Sea Simulator (SeaSim) facility at the Australian Institute of Marine Science (AIMS), Cape Cleveland, Australia
    Data Locations

    Type Location Notes
    Attachment STOTEN Supplementary Data.ods Open Document (.ods) format
    Attachment STOTEN Supplementary Data.xlsx MS Excel (.xlsx) format
    The Data Manager is: Taryn Laubenstein
    College or Centre
    Access conditions Open: free access under license
  • Alternative access conditions
  • Data record size 42 KB
  • Related publications
      Name Laubenstein, Taryn D., Jarrold, Michael D., Rummer, Jodie, L. and Munday, Philip L. (2020) Beneficial effects of diel CO2 cycles on reef fish metabolic performance are diminished under elevated temperature. Science of the Total Environment.
    • URL https://doi.org/10.1016/j.scitotenv.2020.139084
    • Notes In Press, Journal Pre-proof
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    Citation Laubenstein, Taryn (2020): Effects of elevated CO2, diel CO2 cycles, and elevated temperature on metabolic traits in a reef fish. James Cook University. https://doi.org/10.25903/5e6190298ae38