Dataset for mark-release-recapture experiments detailing the place and time of feeding by Anopheles farauti in Haleta village, Solomon Islands

Background: In the 1970s, Anopheles farauti in the Solomon Island responded to indoor residual spraying with DDT by increasingly feeding more often outdoors and earlier in the evening. Although long-lasting insecticidal nets (LLINs) are now the primary malaria vector control intervention, only a small proportion of An. farauti still seeks blood meals indoors and late at night where they are vulnerable to being killing by contract with the insecticides in LLINs. The effectiveness of LLINs and indoor residual spraying (IRS) in controlling malaria transmission where the vectors are most exophagic and early biting will depend on whether the predominant outdoor or early biting phenotypes are associated with a subpopulation of the vectors present.

Methods: Mark-release-recapture experiments were conducted in the Solomon Islands to determine if individual Anopheles farauti repeat the same behaviours over successive feeding cycles. The two behavioural phenotypes examined were those on which the WHO recommended malaria vector control strategies, LLINs and IRS, depend: indoor and late night biting.

Results: Evidence was not found for subpopulations of An. farauti regarding time (early evening or late night) or location (indoor or outdoor) of blood feeding. Individual An. farauti did not consistently repeat the behavioural phenotype expressed for their original blood meal (e.g., while most mosquitoes that fed early and outdoors and would repeat those behaviours, some fed late at night and indoors in the next feeding cycle).

Conclusions: The finding that An. farauti is a homogeneous population is significant as all individual vectors can potentially be exposed to the insecticides used in insecticide treated nets (ITNs) or IRS. Across the multiple feeding cycles required to complete the extrinsic incubation period, individual females may enter houses late at night and potentially be exposed to insecticides in ITNs and IRS. This may explain, in part, the degree of control that LLINs and IRS have exerted against a predominantly outdoor feeding mosquito such as An. farauti. These findings may be applicable to the outdoor feeding vectors that dominate transmission in much of the malaria endemic world and justifies continued distribution of LLINs. However, the population-level tendency of mosquitoes to feed outdoors and early in the evening will require complementary interventions if malaria control can be accelerated towards elimination.e-recapture experiments were conducted in the Solomon Islands to determine if individual Anopheles farauti repeat the same behaviours over successive feeding cycles. The two behavioural phenotypes examined were those on which the WHO recommended malaria vector control strategies, LLINs and IRS, depend: indoor and late night biting.

    Data Record Details
    Data record related to this publication Dataset for mark-release-recapture experiments detailing the place and time of feeding by Anopheles farauti in Haleta village, Solomon Islands
    Data Publication title Dataset for mark-release-recapture experiments detailing the place and time of feeding by Anopheles farauti in Haleta village, Solomon Islands
  • Description

    Background: In the 1970s, Anopheles farauti in the Solomon Island responded to indoor residual spraying with DDT by increasingly feeding more often outdoors and earlier in the evening. Although long-lasting insecticidal nets (LLINs) are now the primary malaria vector control intervention, only a small proportion of An. farauti still seeks blood meals indoors and late at night where they are vulnerable to being killing by contract with the insecticides in LLINs. The effectiveness of LLINs and indoor residual spraying (IRS) in controlling malaria transmission where the vectors are most exophagic and early biting will depend on whether the predominant outdoor or early biting phenotypes are associated with a subpopulation of the vectors present.

    Methods: Mark-release-recapture experiments were conducted in the Solomon Islands to determine if individual Anopheles farauti repeat the same behaviours over successive feeding cycles. The two behavioural phenotypes examined were those on which the WHO recommended malaria vector control strategies, LLINs and IRS, depend: indoor and late night biting.

    Results: Evidence was not found for subpopulations of An. farauti regarding time (early evening or late night) or location (indoor or outdoor) of blood feeding. Individual An. farauti did not consistently repeat the behavioural phenotype expressed for their original blood meal (e.g., while most mosquitoes that fed early and outdoors and would repeat those behaviours, some fed late at night and indoors in the next feeding cycle).

    Conclusions: The finding that An. farauti is a homogeneous population is significant as all individual vectors can potentially be exposed to the insecticides used in insecticide treated nets (ITNs) or IRS. Across the multiple feeding cycles required to complete the extrinsic incubation period, individual females may enter houses late at night and potentially be exposed to insecticides in ITNs and IRS. This may explain, in part, the degree of control that LLINs and IRS have exerted against a predominantly outdoor feeding mosquito such as An. farauti. These findings may be applicable to the outdoor feeding vectors that dominate transmission in much of the malaria endemic world and justifies continued distribution of LLINs. However, the population-level tendency of mosquitoes to feed outdoors and early in the evening will require complementary interventions if malaria control can be accelerated towards elimination.e-recapture experiments were conducted in the Solomon Islands to determine if individual Anopheles farauti repeat the same behaviours over successive feeding cycles. The two behavioural phenotypes examined were those on which the WHO recommended malaria vector control strategies, LLINs and IRS, depend: indoor and late night biting.

  • Other Descriptors
    • Descriptor

      This dataset consists of a description of data archiving and data dictionaries in PDF format and a spreadsheet in MS Excel (.xlsx) and Open Document (.ods) formats

    • Descriptor type Note
    • Descriptor
    • Descriptor type Full
  • Data type dataset
  • Keywords
    • behavioural polymorphism
    • Anopheles farauti
    • Solomon Islands
    • mark-release-recapture
    • heterogenous population
    • insect
  • Funding source
  • Research grant(s)/Scheme name(s)
    • 19377 - (James Cook University Research Activities) Malaria Transmission Consortium Supplement
    • 20247 - (James Cook University Research Activities) Transmission (ICEMR)
  • Research themes
    Tropical Health, Medicine and Biosecurity
    FoR Codes (*)
    • 060201 - Behavioural Ecology
    • 111799 - Public Health and Health Services not elsewhere classified
    SEO Codes
    • 960405 - Control of Pests, Diseases and Exotic Species at Regional or Larger Scales
    • 920499 - Public Health (excl. Specific Population Health) not elsewhere classified
    Specify spatial or temporal setting of the data
    Temporal (time) coverage
  • Start Date 2011/11/23
  • End Date 2012/05/16
  • Time Period
    Spatial (location) coverage
  • Locations
    • Nggela Sule Island, Solomon Islands
    • Haleta, Solomon Islands
  • Related publications
      Name Russell, Tanya L., Beebe, Nigel W., Bugoro, Hugo, Apairamo, Allan, Collins, Frank H., Cooper, Robert D., Lobo, Neil F., and Burkot, Thomas R. (2016) Anopheles farauti is a homogeneous population that blood feeds early and outdoors in the Solomon Islands. Malaria Journal, 15 (151). pp. 1-7.
    • URL http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12936-016-1194-9
    • Notes Open Access
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    The data will be licensed under CC BY: Attribution 3.0 AU
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  • Data owners
      James Cook University
    Citation Russell, Tanya; Burkot, Thomas; Beebe, N; Bugoro, H; Apairamo, A; Collins, F; Cooper, R; Lobo, N (2016): Dataset for mark-release-recapture experiments detailing the place and time of feeding by Anopheles farauti in Haleta village, Solomon Islands. James Cook University. https://doi.org/10.4225/28/56BD124CC9260