About

Adam’s research interests include the ecology and conservation of chondrichthyans (sharks, batoids and chimaeras), teleosts and sea turtles. This includes studying the roles of predators in structuring ecosystems, with a focus on predator-prey relationships, and spatial ecology (i.e. migration, movement behaviour and habitat use).

Other interests include assessing the effectiveness of Marine Protected Areas for sharks, identifying essential fish habitats, and evaluating the effects of tourism on animal behaviour and health (e.g. shark provisioning and recreational fishing).

Presently, Adam is involved in a range of research projects along the east coast of Australia, Papua New Guinea, Fiji, Mozambique and South Africa.

Research Disciplines
Publications

These are the most recent publications associated with this author. To see a detailed profile of all publications stored at JCU, visit ResearchOnline@JCU. Hover over Altmetrics badges to see social impact.

Journal Articles
More

ResearchOnline@JCU stores 84+ research outputs authored by Dr Adam Barnett from 2005 onwards.

Current Funding

Current and recent Research Funding to JCU is shown by funding source and project.

Fisheries Research & Development Corporation - Research Grant

2021-111 ? Addressing uncertainties in the assessment and management of Queensland east coast Spanish Mackerel

Indicative Funding
$28,347 over 2 years (administered by Department of Agriculture and Fisheries)
Summary
JCU will provide data summaries to DAF from data collected on shark depredation via a mobile application. This will include data on shark interactions for fishers targeting Spanish mackerel (percentage of catch lost to sharks), aggregated spatial heat maps of depredation and other information related to fishing methods. This will help address uncertainties in the Queensland east coast Spanish Mackerel fishery.
Investigators
Adam Barnett (College of Science & Engineering)
Keywords
Spanish Mackerel; Scomberomorus commerson (SCOMBRIDAE); Fisheries; Depredation; Mobile application; Citizen Science

Australian Society for Fish Biology - Michael Hall Student Innovation Award

Unveiling the Whale Shark Mystery: Threats and Conservation Hotspots in the Coral Sea

Indicative Funding
$2,000 over 1 year
Summary
Across the globe, whale shark conservation efforts are guided by research at aggregation sites. Our research has unveiled the existence of the first aggregation site of whale sharks on the east coast of Australia. The project will identify essential habitats and undertake a risk assessment for whale sharks in the Coral Sea and wider Asia/West Pacific region. This critical information is required for the conservation (e.g., for IUCN assessments, protected area management in Coral Sea) of this endangered and globally still declining species.
Investigators
Ingo Miller and Adam Barnett (College of Science & Engineering)
Keywords
Whale sharks; Telemetry; Migration; Manta Rays; Satellite Tracking; aggregation

SeaWorld Research and Rescue Foundation Inc - Marine vertebrate grant

In search of whale shark and manta ray aggregations on the Great Barrier Reef

Indicative Funding
$25,800 over 2 years
Summary
Identifying important habitats and describing movement patterns is critical for management. Little is known about whale sharks and reef manta ray ecology in the NE coast of Australia. In 2019, we identified potential aggregation sites around Wreck Bay. This project will conduct an expedition to Wreck Bay. We will use satellite tracking, photo-ID and genetic analysis to identify hotspots, determine connectivity with other regions, and assess the threats (fishing, shipping lanes) they face throughout their home range. This will allow us to determine the significance of the region for these species' ecology and conservation.
Investigators
Katya Abrantes, Adam Barnett and Chris Rohner (College of Science & Engineering and Marine Megafauna Foundation)
Keywords
Whale sharks; Satellite tracking; Migration; Manta rays

Ecological Society of Australia - Holsworth Wildlife Research Endowment

How are stingray communities distributed across tropical intertidal sandflats and which environmental factors influence their habitat use?

Indicative Funding
$11,665 over 3 years
Summary
Stingrays are important meso-predators in coastal habitats around the world that impact biotic communities and structure physical environments. However, broad spatial assessments of ray habitat use are lacking, resulting in poor understanding of their ecological value and how to implement effective management strategies. The project aims to assess how the composition of stingray communities varies across tropical intertidal sandflats and which environmental variables (including prey availability) influence their distribution patterns. This goal is divided into five research objectives whose outcomes will improve habitat use models for intertidal rays and investigate important aspects of ray foraging and movement behaviours.
Investigators
Jaelen Myers, Marcus Sheaves, Carlo Mattone, Michael Bradley and Adam Barnett (College of Science & Engineering)
Keywords
Predator-prey; Habitat use; stingray; Intertidal sandflat; Animal distribution

Cairns Airport Pty Ltd - Contract Research

Food Web Assessment of the Cairns Airport Waterways.

Indicative Funding
$88,350 over 1 year
Summary
This project aims to assess the food web organisation of the waterways adjacent to the Cairns Airport, to identify the species most likely to be impacted by per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS). PFAS are toxic persistent pollutants that accumulate up the food chains and can be transferred to people that consume fish caught in contaminated waterways. The study will construct a model of food web functioning based on stable isotope analysis (producers, invertebrates and fish). By describing the food web, it will be possible to identify where the risk of PFAS exposure to people (through fish consumption) is present.
Investigators
Katya Abrantes, Adam Barnett and Marcus Sheaves (College of Science & Engineering)
Keywords
Food webs; Estuaries; Stable isotope analysis

Save Our Seas Foundation - Grant

Does natal philopatry drive variable female bull shark movement?

Indicative Funding
$8,349 over 1 year
Summary
Despite recent advances in animal movement ecology and an increased number of studies revealing the spatio-temporal patterns of large-scale movement, drivers of movement remain less well understood in many taxa. Why animals move, however, provides vital information on life history strategies, such as reproduction and feeding behaviour, how animals interact with their environment and how they may respond to future change. Sharks and rays are no exception and for many species the drivers of movement remain unknown. This project uses acoustic telemetry and genetics to investigate reproduction as a driver for variable female bull shark movement along Australia's East Coast.
Investigators
Nicolas Lubitz and Adam Barnett (College of Science & Engineering)
Keywords
Elasmobranchs; Reproduction; Connectivity; Conservation; Migration; Marine Predators

Ecological Society of Australia - Holsworth Wildlife Research Endowment

Does natal philopatry drive variable female bull shark movement?

Indicative Funding
$10,545 over 2 years
Summary
Despite recent advances in animal movement ecology and an increased number of studies revealing the spatio-temporal patterns of large-scale movement, drivers of movement remain less well understood in many taxa. Why animals move, however, provides vital information on life history strategies, such as reproduction and feeding behaviour, how animals interact with their environment and how they may respond to future change. Sharks and rays are no exception and for many species the drivers of movement remain unknown. This project uses acoustic telemetry and genetics to investigate reproduction as a driver for variable female bull shark movement along Australia?s East Coast.
Investigators
Nicolas Lubitz and Adam Barnett (College of Science & Engineering)
Keywords
Elasmobranchs; Migration; natal philopatry; Reproduction; coastal systems; Population Connectivity

Australian Government Department of Agriculture, Water and the Environment - National Soil Science Challenge

Movement patterns of dolphinfish Coryphaena hippurus around fish aggregating devices (FADs)

Indicative Funding
$16,390 over 3 years
Summary
Dolphinfish Coryphaena hippurus are an economically important fisheries species in both commercial and recreational sectors in Queensland and associate with floating objects on the ocean?s surface including fish aggregating devices (FADs). FADs are often deployed along coasts to provide fishing opportunities for the general public, and dolphinfish represent a key target species at FADs in Queensland. It is not clear, however, the degree to which dolphinfish use devices like FADs, their residency at those locations, whether dolphinfish move between a network of FADs, or whether FADs modify movement patterns relative to existing drivers of dolphinfish distribution (like water temperature). This project aims to address these knowledge gaps.
Investigators
Adam Barnett (College of Science & Engineering)
Keywords
Fisheries; Spatial Ecology; Animal Movement; Dolphinfish; Acoustic Telemetry; Climate Change

Australian Institute of Marine Science - Contract Research

Tracking large scale movements of species with fishery interest and/or conservation concern.

Indicative Funding
$457,544 over 3 years
Summary
State-wide acoustic receiver and transmitter infrastructure covering inshore coastal waters in collaboration with the DAF Queensland Shark Control Program and Fish Aggregating Device Program, will be deployed in order to define the extent and timing of movement of priority species along the east coast of Queensland, and relationships to climate change or other environmental drivers that alter movement or distribution of species.
Investigators
Adam Barnett in collaboration with Leanne Currey-Randall and Marcus Sheaves (College of Science & Engineering and Australian Institute of Marine Science)
Keywords
Stock Structure; Connectivity; Movement; Shark; Acoustic Tracking; Fish

WV Scott Charitable Trust - Research Grant

Addressing urgent welfare concerns for Blackspotted Croaker (Protonibea diacanthus) populations in Queensland

Indicative Funding
$50,000 over 3 years
Summary
The Blackspotted Croaker (also known as black jewfish) is targeted by commercial, recreational, indigenous and charter fishing groups. Since 2017 there has been a rapid increase in targeted commercial fishing effort for Blackspotteed Croaker in Queensland. Given the high value of Blackspotteed Croaker, their vulnerability as aggregating species and the absence of a stock assessment to inform how many populations need to be managed, updated biological/ecological information (Including stock structure) are needed for assessment and protection of Blackspotted Croaker stock(s) in Queensland. The study aims at identifying stock structure and connectivity (including aggregation time) in order to improve management of th species across Queensland.
Investigators
Marcus Sheaves, Adam Barnett, Carlo Mattone and Michael Bradley (College of Science & Engineering)
Keywords
Population Genetic Structure; Fisheries Management; Epinephelus nigritus (Serranidae); Blackspotted Croaker

SeaWorld Research and Rescue Foundation Inc - Research Grant

Determining population structure and connectivity of elephant fish stocks in southern Australia

Indicative Funding
$24,000 over 4 years
Summary
Elephant fish reproductive aggregations are targets of commercial and recreational fisheries. Although stock structure is unkown, Australian populations are currently treated as a single stock by management. A recent study revealed limited movement between different fishing zones (Tasmania and Bass Strait), suggesting limited connectivity between regionals. However, some individuals moved between zones, making it difficult to draw conclusions about broader stock structure and genetic connectivity. In addition, elephant fish may comprise >1 species, as there seems to be different morphologies between Australian and New Zealand fish. This project studies the genetic connectivity of elephant fish across thei8r range to identify the number of populations and possible cryptic speciation, and the mechanisms driving these patterns.
Investigators
Adam Barnett, Christine Dudgeon and Katya Abrantes (College of Science & Engineering and The University of Queensland)
Keywords
Stock Assessment; Genetics; Connectivity; Chimaeras; Fisheries; cryptic speciation

Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade (DFAT) - Council on Australia Latin America Relations (COALAR)

Building local capacity for aquatic wildlife?s sustainable management: Patagonia, Argentina

Indicative Funding
$11,210 over 3 years
Summary
Patagonia, Argentina, is facing alarming aquatic wildlife resource risks. This project will build local capacity for the sustainable management of Patagonian wildlife resources by skilling scientists at the Patagonian National Centre through a new collaboration agreement with James Cook University.
Investigators
Adam Barnett and Marcus Sheaves in collaboration with Alejo Irigoyen (College of Science & Engineering and Centro Nacional Patagonico (CENPAT))
Keywords
Capacity Building; Education; Animal movement technology; Predators
Supervision

These Higher Degree Research projects are either current or by students who have completed their studies within the past 5 years at JCU. Linked titles show theses available within ResearchOnline@JCU.

Current
  • Assessing the potential for recreational fishing to contribute to conservation of coastal marine species and habitats (PhD , Secondary Advisor)
  • Ecological and Environmental Characteristics of Nurseries of Fisheries Species, and Implications for the Management of Critical Fish Habitats (PhD , Secondary Advisor)
  • How are stingray communities distributed across tropical intertidal sandflats and which environmental factors influence their habit use? (PhD , Secondary Advisor)
  • Marine megafauna movement ecology in a changing environment (PhD , Primary Advisor)
  • Sharks and rays in time: the importance of temporal scales in the approaches used to investigate species (Masters , Primary Advisor/AM/Adv)
  • The lost years: identifying and assessing essential habitats for juvenile sharks. (Masters , Primary Advisor)
Completed
Collaboration

The map shows research collaborations by institution from the past 7 years.
Note: Map points are indicative of the countries or states that institutions are associated with.

  • 5+ collaborations
  • 4 collaborations
  • 3 collaborations
  • 2 collaborations
  • 1 collaboration
  • Indicates the Tropics (Torrid Zone)

Connect with me
Share my profile
Share my profile:
jcu.me/adam.barnett

Email
Location
Find me on…
Icon for Scopus Author page

Similar to me

  1. A/PROF Neil Hutchinson
    JCU Singapore
  2. Prof Colin Simpfendorfer
    Marine & Aquaculture Sciences
  3. Dr Andrew Chin
    Marine & Aquaculture Sciences
  4. Dr Katya Abrantes
    Marine & Aquaculture Sciences
  5. Prof Jodie Rummer
    Marine & Aquaculture Sciences