About

Andrew originally trained as a forensic and clinical psychologist and is a Fellow of the Australian Psychological Society. He has published 12 books (edited and authored) and over 150 academic journal articles and book chapters. His current research interests relate to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander hgiher education, forensic and clinical psychology, and the criminal justice system.

 

 

Research Disciplines
Socio-Economic Objectives
Honours
Fellowships
  • 2011 - Fellow of the Australian Psychological Society
Publications

These are the most recent publications associated with this author. To see a detailed profile of all publications stored at JCU, visit ResearchOnline@JCU. Hover over Altmetrics badges to see social impact.

Journal Articles
Book Chapters
More

ResearchOnline@JCU stores 122+ research outputs authored by Prof Andrew Day from 2006 onwards.

Current Funding

Current and recent Research Funding to JCU is shown by funding source and project.

Corrections Victoria - Contract Research

Evaluation of Programs for Serious Violent Offenders

Indicative Funding
$14,882 (administered by Swinburne University of Technology)
Summary
This work involves a qualitative study into the experiences of staff administering program for serious violent offenders.
Investigators
Andrew Day in collaboration with Michael Daffern (Indigenous Education & Research Centre and Swinburne University of Technology)
Keywords
Violent Offender; Rehabilitation; Program; Outcomes; Correctional Services; Forensic Psychology

QLD Department of Justice & Attorney General - Queensland Corrective Services Tender

Development of an Intervention Pathway and/or models that reduce reoffending for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander sexual offenders

Indicative Funding
$200,000 over 2 years
Summary
This project will develop a pathway for intervention for QLD Correctional Service clients who are known sexual offenders from Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultural backgrounds. It will involve community and criminal justice consultations and the preparation of advice for the Department.
Investigators
Andrew Day, Amon Tamatea, Shawn Ross, Alan Clough, Lynore Geia, Garry Kidd and Sharon Casey (Indigenous Education & Research Centre, University of Waikato, The University of Melbourne, College of Public Health, Medical & Vet Sciences and College of Healthcare Sciences)
Keywords
Sex offender; Reintegration; Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander

Swinburne University of Technology - Contract Research

Case Management Review project

Indicative Funding
$30,000 over 2 years
Summary
This project will investigate the application of the Good Lives Model of case management with offenders in Victoria. A Literature review, file audit and interviews with staff will provide the basis for the research team to provide advice to Corrections Victoria about the appropriateness of the current model.
Investigators
Andrew Day, Michael Daffern and James Ogloff (Indigenous Education & Research Centre and Swinburne University of Technology)
Keywords
Offender; Case Management; Risk; Good Lives Model

Good Grief Ltd - Contract Research

Evaluation of the Seasons for Growth Program

Indicative Funding
$35,800 over 2 years
Summary
This project concerns the external evaluation of the Seasons for Growth children and young people's program. Seasons for Growth, which has been delive3red in over 3,000 schools and communities across Australia and has been described as prevention through education and skills building. The program, which is managed by Good Grief Ltd, aims to support children and young people to understand and adapt to significant cahnge, loss and grief in their lives. A key feature is that it is delivered throug a model of "companion training," in which community. It is a not-for-profit initiative, sponsored by the MacKillop Foundation, and the program is made available to communities at low cost.
Investigators
Andrew Day (Indigenous Education & Research Centre)
Keywords
Evaluation; Program; Grief and Loss

ANROWS - Research Grant

Understanding effectiveness in men's behaviour change programmes

Indicative Funding
$113,327 over 3 years
Summary
In recent years, Men's Behaviour Change Programmes (MBCPs) have come to play an increasingly important role in efforts to prevent domestic violence in mandated populations. Current evidence about the programme effectiveness, however, is weak and severely limited bymethodological problems, with exiting work both in Australia and overseas largely failing to provide the type of information that policy makers need regarding which programmes to fund, scale up, or discontinue. The aims of this project are to answer the following research questions: i) what is the logic underpinning the delivery of MBCPsfor mandated clients in Australia? ii) how important are referral pathways and participant selection criteria to programme outcomes? iii) what is the intended impact of different programme components? iv) what short-term programme outcome measures should be routinely administered? v) what are best practice guidelines for use in assessing the quality of delivery of content.
Investigators
Andrew Day and Donna Chung in collaboration with Rodney Vlais (Indigenous Education & Research Centre, Curtin University of Technology and Private Consultant / Practitioner)
Keywords
Women; Behaviour Change; Domestic Violence

Australian Research Council - Linkage - Projects

The effective treatment of drug using offenders: The impact of treatment modality, coercion and treatment readiness on criminal recidivism

Indicative Funding
$17,316 over 2 years
Summary
A range of criminal justice initiatives introduced across Australia seek to address the drugs/crime nexus. It is now well established that drug users commit a high percentage of all crime, with the frequency and severity of that crime rising and falling with level of drug use. The benchmark for policy makers, correctional agencies, and the public for assessing the effectiveness of interventions with convicted offenders is reduced recidivism. This study assesses the effectiveness of different treatment modalities, including compulsory treatment, in achieving this goal. The research will help identify effective (and cost-effective) interventions for reducing drug use and criminality.
Investigators
Andrew Day in collaboration with Sharon Casey and Astrid Birgden (Indigenous Education & Research Centre, Deakin University and New South Wales Department of Justice)
Keywords
offender rehabilitation; Substance Use; prisons; recidivism; compulsory treatment

ANROWS - Research Grant

The Forgotten Victims: Prisoner Experience of Victimisation and Engagement with the Criminal Justice System

Indicative Funding
$47,499 over 3 years
Summary
This research involves an analysis of interviews with women prisoners about the relationship between their victimisation experiences and engagement with the criminal justice system. This is a group of women who are likely to be highly traumatised, present with complex service needs, and have extensive contact with both the justice and child protection systems. The primary analysis, documenting the experiences of victims, will be augmented with and analysis of the views of key stakeholders involved in providing services to this population. This will lead to the identification of areas of unmet need, the barriers that exist to service utilisation, and articulation of potential solutions.
Investigators
Andrew Day in collaboration with Sharon Casey and Adam Gerace (Indigenous Education & Research Centre, Deakin University and Flinders University)
Keywords
Women; Aboriginal; prisoner; Domestic Violence

Australian Research Council - Discovery Indigenous

Indigenous persistence in formal learning

Indicative Funding
$284,207
Summary
This is a novel and innovative project to scientifically exam,ine under-explored aspects of learning that can improve the educational performance of Indigenous students in tertiary studies. The aim of this project is to contribut much needed research evidence of Indigenous persistence in learning and academic performance, and to deepen knowledge and understandings of what works for Indigenous students as they engage in formal learning situations.
Investigators
Martin Nakata, Andrew Day and Gregory Martin (Indigenous Education & Research Centre, University of Technology and Sydney)
Keywords
Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander; Indigenous; Learners; Learning
Supervision

These Higher Degree Research projects are either current or by students who have completed their studies within the past 5 years at JCU. Linked titles show theses available within ResearchOnline@JCU.

Current
  • Understanding and Developing Appropriate Service Responses for Aboriginal Youth Involved in the Juvenile Justice System (PhD , Primary Advisor)
Collaboration

The map shows research collaborations by institution from the past 7 years.
Note: Map points are indicative of the countries or states that institutions are associated with.

  • 5+ collaborations
  • 4 collaborations
  • 3 collaborations
  • 2 collaborations
  • 1 collaboration
  • Indicates the Tropics (Torrid Zone)

Connect with me
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Email
Phone
Location
  • 33.107, SIAS Media Centre (Townsville campus)

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