About

Professor Cunneen has an international reputation as a leading criminologist specialising in Indigenous people and the law, juvenile justice, restorative justice, policing, prison issues and human rights.

Chris has participated with a number of Australian Royal Commissions and Inquiries (including the Stolen Generations Inquiry, the Royal Commission into Aboriginal Deaths in Custody and the National Inquiry into Racist Violence), and with the federal Australian Human Rights Commission. He taught criminology at Sydney Law School (1990-2005) where he was appointed as Professor in 2004. He was also the Director of the Institute of Criminology (1999-2005) at the University of Sydney.

Professor Cunneen has held research positions with the Indigenous Law Centre, University of New South Wales (UNSW), and the NSW Bureau of Crime Statistics and Research. Between 2006 and 2010 he was the NewSouth Global Chair in Criminology at UNSW and continues as a Conjoint Professor at UNSW Law Faculty. He is also an Adjunct Professor at the Institute of Criminology, University of Victoria, Wellington, NZ.

Interests
Research
  • criminology
  • social science and law
  • Australian prisons and the growth in imprisonment
  • juvenile justice
  • restorative justice
  • the relationship of Indigenous people to dominant legal systems both in Australia and internationally
  • human rights and social justice.
Research Disciplines
Socio-Economic Objectives
Honours
Memberships
  • The American Society of Criminology
  • The Australian and New Zealand Society of Criminology
  • The Indian Association for Australian Studies
  • Editorial Board, The Australian and New Zealand Journal of Criminology
  • Editorial Board, Current Issues in Criminal Justice
  • Editorial Board, Youth Studies
  • Editorial Board, Crime Media Culture
  • Editorial Board, The Australian Indigenous Law Review
  • Chairperson of the NSW Juvenile Justice Advisory Council (2000-2007)
  • Member of the New South Wales Attorney-Generals’ Taskforce on Sexual Assault in Aboriginal Communities (2002-2006)
Publications

These are the most recent publications associated with this author. To see a detailed profile of all publications stored at JCU, visit ResearchOnline@JCU. Hover over Altmetrics badges to see social impact.

Journal Articles
Books
Book Chapters
Current Funding

Current and recent Research Funding to JCU is shown by funding source and project.

Australian Research Council - Linkage - Projects

National research study of the civil and family law needs of Indigenous people

Indicative Funding
$466,157 over 4 years, in partnership with Legal Aid Queensland ($15,000 over 3 yrs); Legal Aid Western Australia ($30,000 over 3 yrs); the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Legal Service (Qld) Ltd ($15,000 over 2 yrs); the Northern Territory Legal Aid Commission ($30,000 over 3 yrs) and Victoria Legal Aid ($30,000 over 3 yrs)
Summary
This research will benefit Indigenous communities by improving access and equity in legal services. By identifying and addressing the civil and family law needs of Indigenous people, the research will make a key contribution to improving legal and social justice outcomes. Partner organisations in the research will actively implement the findings to the national benefit, creating more appropriate, accessible and better targeted legal services aimed at meeting identified needs. The research will make an important contribution to the Commonwealth's welfare reform and participation agendas, particularly its Access to Justice Framework as better access to legal services can play an important role in alleviating economic and social disadvantage.
Investigators
Chris Cunneen, Melanie Schwartz and Larissa Behrendt (College of Business, Law & Governance, The University of New South Wales and University of Adelaide)
Keywords
access to jutice; Indigenous people and the law; Public Policy Systems Analysis; civil & family law

Australian Research Council - Discovery - Projects

A Comparative Analysis of Youth Punishment in Australia and the UK

Indicative Funding
$429,000 over 3 years
Summary
The punishment of young offenders is a major feature of contemporary criminal justice policy. The Youth Punishment Project compares Australian and UK approaches to juvenile punishment and penal policy. The Project will examine developments in juvenile punishment, with a focus on the reasons behind increases in juvenile detention. The Project will examine countervailing influences in youth punishment including risk aversion, children's rights, restorative justice and retribution approaches. The Project uses an innovative multidisciplinary and comparative approach combining law, criminology and penology. A major outcome of the study will be policy-relevant analysis of differing approaches to juvenile penalty and their outcomes.
Investigators
Chris Cunneen, Eileen Baldry, David Brown, Barry Goldson and Melanie Schwartz (College of Business, Law & Governance, The University of New South Wales and University of Liverpool)
Keywords
Penology; Juvenile Justice; Sentencing
Supervision

Advisory Accreditation: I can be on your Advisory Panel as a Primary or Secondary Advisor.

These Higher Degree Research projects are either current or by students who have completed their studies within the past 5 years at JCU. Linked titles show theses available within ResearchOnline@JCU.

Current
  • A Critical Analysis of the Needs of Female Survivors of Sexual Violence and their Experiences with Transitional Justice - the Case of Rwandan Gacaca. (PhD , Primary Advisor)
  • Hot, Cold, Lukewarm: A comparative Study on the History and Governance of Indigeneous Peoples in Denmark and Australia. (PhD , Primary Advisor)
  • Indigenous Peoples and Consumer Law: The Impact of Culture History and Location. (PhD , Primary Advisor)
  • Access to Justice; Racial Discrimination Law and Indigenous Australians. (PhD , Primary Advisor)
Completed
Data

These are the most recent metadata records associated with this researcher. To see a detailed description of all dataset records, visit the JCU Research Data Catalogue.

Collaboration

The map shows research collaborations by institution from the past 7 years.
Note: Map points are indicative of the countries or states that institutions are associated with.

  • 5+ collaborations
  • 4 collaborations
  • 3 collaborations
  • 2 collaborations
  • 1 collaboration
  • Indicates the Tropics (Torrid Zone)

Connect with me
Share my profile
Share my profile:
jcu.me/chris.cunneen

Email
Phone
Location
  • D3.108, The Cairns Institute (Cairns campus)
Advisory Accreditation
Advisor Mentor
Find me on…
Icon for external homepage Icon for Scopus Author page

Similar to me

  1. Dr Mark David Chong
    College of Arts, Society & Education
  2. A/Prof Glenn Dawes
    College of Arts, Society & Education
  3. Dr Garry Coventry
    College of Arts, Society & Education
  4. Prof Andrew Day
    Indigenous Education & Research Centre
  5. Fiona Allison
    Cairns Institute