About

 

Jeremy Furyk is an Emergency Physician at The Townsville Hospital and an Adjunct Associate Professor at James Cook University (JCU).   He graduated from medical school at Monash University in 1996, completed Australasian College of Emergency Medicine (ACEM) Training in 2005, and is a member of the ACEM Clinical Trials Group.  He completed a Masters of Public Health and Tropical Medicine through JCU, and a Masters of Science in Clinical Trials, through London University.  He is passionate about evidence based medicine, research and developing world medicine.  He has diverse clinical and research interests but more recently is focussing on paediatric emergency research with the Paediatric Research in Emergency Departments International Collaborative (PREDICT).   

 

Socio-Economic Objectives
Honours
Awards
  • 2014 - Best paper by a Fellow, ACEM ASM
Fellowships
  • 2005 - Fellow of the Australasian College for Emergency Medicine
  • 2008 to 2009 - Noel Stevenson Fellowship - The Queensland Emergency Medicine research Foundation
Memberships
  • 2008 - Fellow of the Australasian College of Tropical Medicine
Publications

These are the most recent publications associated with this author. To see a detailed profile of all publications stored at JCU, visit ResearchOnline@JCU. Hover over Altmetrics badges to see social impact.

Journal Articles
More

ResearchOnline@JCU stores 24+ research outputs authored by Dr Jeremy Furyk from 2009 onwards.

Current Funding

Current and recent Research Funding to JCU is shown by funding source and project.

Emergency Medicine Foundation - Project Grant

Status Epilepticus Australasian Registry for Children

Indicative Funding
$69,992 over 2 years
Summary
Study design- A prospective observational cohort study of children 4 weeks to 16 years of age, who have CSE managed at a PREDICT emergency department. Objectives - To describe characteristics of a cohort of children in Australia and New Zealand in terms of incidence, aetiology and outcome. To explore pre-hospital and emergency department care variability in management and associations between predictor variables and outcomes.
Investigators
Jeremy Furyk in collaboration with Stuart Dalziel, Franz Babl, Ed Oakley and Kerrianne Watt (College of Public Health, Medical & Vet Sciences, Royal Auckland Childrens Hospital and Royal Childrens Hospital)
Keywords
Convulsive Status Epilepticus; Paediatric; Registered Nurses; Emergency Department

Emergency Medicine Foundation - Project Grant

Tranexamic acid for the treatment of gastrointestinal bleeding: an international randomised, double blind placebo controlled trial

Indicative Funding
$185,788 over 2 years
Summary
Gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding is a common emergency with a substantial mortality rate. Bleeding from the upper gastrointestinal system is caused by ulcers, stomach inflammation and oesophageal varices and carries a fatality rate of up to 10%. Lower GI bleeding has a variety of causes and a case fatality of about 15%. Between 10% and 25% of patients will have a repeat bleed after their first episode, and these people are four times more likely to die than people without repeated bleeding.
Investigators
Luke Lawton and Jeremy Furyk in collaboration with Ogilvie Thom, Glenn Ryan, Frances Kinnear, Gerben Keijzers, Douglas Morel and Catharine Grobler (College of Medicine & Dentistry, Nambour Hospital, Princess Alexandra Hospital, The Prince Charles Hospital, Gold Coast Hospital, Redcliffe Hospital and Queen Elizabeth Hospital)
Keywords
Gastrointestinal bleeding; Mortality; tranexamic acid; Emergency Department

Emergency Medicine Foundation - Project Grant

ConSEPT: Convulsive Status Epilepticus Paediatric Trial

Indicative Funding
$147,820 over 4 years
Summary
Convulsive Status Epilepticus (CSE) is a true medical emergency and we are trying to find out what is the best drug to use in this situation. We know that if attempts are not made to stop the seizure a child would be at risk of having severe brain damage or dying. First line drugs are used on 2 occasions to try to stop the seizure; if these are unsuccessful second line drugs (Phenytoin or Levetiracetam) are given. Phenytoin is usually what is given in this situation, but has some worrying side effects and it has to be given slowly over 20 minutes. Doctors think Levetiracetam may be better because it has less side effects, can be given faster over 5 minutes, and may give better results. We want to compare the two drugs. This study will be a world first and have a profound impact on the management of CSE in children in New Zealand, Australia and worldwide, in tier confirming the current second line medication used or recommending a new second line medication.
Investigators
Jeremy Furyk in collaboration with Lisa Lucas, Shane George and Natalie Phillips (College of Medicine & Dentistry and Townsville Hospital and Health Services)
Keywords
Convulsive Status Epilipticus; Phenytoin; Levetiracetam; Emergency Department

Emergency Medicine Foundation - Research Grant

MIST:Magnesium in the Acute Management of Irukandji Syndrome

Indicative Funding
$105,282 over 2 years
Summary
The efficacy of magnesium sulphate on the relief of pain in patients with Irukandji syndrome: A Multicentre, A pre-hospital and Emergency Departrment Randomised Controlled Trial.
Investigators
Jeremy Furyk, Clinton Gibbs and Mark Little in collaboration with Jamie Seymour, Kelvin Robertson, Ben Butson, Luke Wheatley, John Rathbone and Steve Rashford (College of Medicine & Dentistry, Townsville Hospital and Health Services, Cairns Base Hospital, College of Science & Engineering and Queensland Ambulance Service)
Keywords
Irukandji Syndrome; Pain; Magnesium; Emergency Department
Collaboration

The map shows research collaborations by institution from the past 7 years.
Note: Map points are indicative of the countries or states that institutions are associated with.

  • 5+ collaborations
  • 4 collaborations
  • 3 collaborations
  • 2 collaborations
  • 1 collaboration
  • Indicates the Tropics (Torrid Zone)

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