About

Dr. Jodie Rummer’s background is in marine biology and comparative physiology. She is currently a Professor of Marine Biology at James Cook University and Research Associate at the Australian Research Council (ARC) Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies. But, prior to joining JCU, Jodie’s academic training started in the U.S. (BSc and MSc degrees from the University of West Florida), took her to Canada (PhD from the University of British Columbia), and then to Hong Kong for a short post-doctoral fellowship. Dr. Rummer joined JCU in 2011 as an ARC Super Science Fellow (2011-2014), continued on as an ARC Early Career Discovery Fellow (2015-2017), and was promoted to full Professor on 1 July 2022. Internationally, Dr. Rummer is also on the editorial board for three scientific journals and, in 2020, was invited to the UNESCO Intergovernmental Oceanographic Committee (IOC) advisory panel on global deoxygenation (Global Oxygen Network, GO2NE), which is part of the United Nations Decade of Ocean Science for Sustainable Development program.

Professor Rummer has accolades for her research as well as her capacity to communicate and connect her findings to broad and diverse audiences. She received the highly prestigious UNESCO-L’Oréal Women in Science Fellowship for Australia and New Zealandand the Society for Experimental Biology’s President’s Medal, was named one of Australia’s top 5 scientists under the age of 40 by the Australian Broadcasting Corporation (ABC) and Radio National (RN), presented a TEDx talk (“Athletes of the Great Barrier Reef”), was named one of the Women in Science Ambassadors for the Australian Government Department of Industry, Innovation, & Science, and was awarded Queensland’s Tall Poppy outstanding early career researcher, scientist of the year in 2019.  

Jodie gave the President’s lecture at the New England Aquarium in Boston and was an invited speaker at the Gills Club Symposium “Shark Tales: Women Making Waves” and educational outreach day in 2017. Jodie gave a Planet Talk at WOMADelaide in 2019, which was attended by over 100,000 people, regarding the harmful effects of oil drilling and pollution on marine life, which was featured in short documentary called Wild Waters and covered by the Adelaide Review, the ABC, andSustainable Home Hub. Jodie also spoke at the World Science Festival in Brisbane in 2019 on “Saving what we’ve got: Australia’s wildlife under threat” and “Let’s talk: Sharks”, both sold out events reaching in person and online audiences exceeding 100,000. Dr Rummer spoke at the 2021 Global Biodiversity Festival, is currently a spokesperson for the Climate Media Centre,and also works closely with Citizens of the Great Barrier Reef and the Great Reef Census.

Jodie and her team, through the work of Tom Vierus, produced an 8-minute documentary covering their ongoing (since 2013) shark research in French Polynesia, which debuted at the New York City Wildlife Conservation Film Festival and four other Film Festivals so far (with >25,000 reached on social media) as well as two short videos (check them out here and here). Jodie has also discussed her team’s shark research on National Geographic Wild, Ocean Treks with Jeff Corwin, and on Discovery Canada and Shark Week (see Twitter and Facebook for short clips).

Over the course of her career, Dr. Rummer has researched fish buoyancy, exercise, and is a leading authority on the evolution of oxygen transport and how fish maintain performance during stress. Today, Jodie’s team combines physiology, ecology, and evolution to address issues important to conservation, such as the effects of climate change and other anthropogenic problems on coral reef fishes, sharks, and rays and the potential for adaptation. Jodie has published more than 100 peer-reviewed journal articles and 13 book chapters as well as dozens of editorials, and she has presented her work at more than 100 professional conferences and public events worldwide.

You can find out about Dr. Rummer’s research and her lab at www.jodierummer.com and www.physioshark.org, on Instagram (@RummerLab and @physioshark), Facebook (Physioshark Project), and on Twitter (@physiologyfish) where she communicates scientific findings, highlights fellow scientists’ success stories and achievements, and advocates for issues related to women in science, gender equity, and diversity in STEM. 

Teaching
  • AQ3007: Aquatic Animal Ecophysiology (Level 3; TSV)
  • BS2460: Fundamentals of Ecology (Level 2; TSV)
  • MB1110: Introductory Marine Science (Level 1; TSV)
  • MB2080: Invertebrate Biology (Level 2; TSV)
  • MB3050: Biological Oceanography (Level 3; TSV)
  • MB3200: Marine Conservation Biology (Level 3; TSV)
  • MB5055: Biological Oceanography (Level 5; TSV)
Interests
Research
  • Ecological, Evolutionary, and Conservation Physiology in Fish • The physiology, performance indicators of stress, and acclimation strategies of fish • Environmental adaptations related to O2, CO2 exchange, acid-base balance, and ion regulation • Evolution of life history tactics, distribution patterns, and biogeography
  • Hyperbaric, thermal, O2, CO2, pH, water balance, & ionregulation performance assays • Blood sampling, surgical techniques, O2 & pH micro-sensing fiber-optic technology • Evolutionary reconstructions of physiological traits and phylogenetic comparisons
Experience
  • 2015 to present - Academic Editor, Conservation Physiology
  • 2014 to present - Senior Research Fellow (Assistant Professor, Research), ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studie (James Cook University, AUSTRALIA)
  • 2014 to present - Academic Editor, PLoS One
  • 2015 to 2017 - ARC Discovery Fellow (DECRA), ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef StudiesARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies (James Cook University, AUSTRALIA)
  • 2011 to 2014 - ARC Super Science Research Fellow, ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef StudiesARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies (James Cook University, AUSTRALIA)
  • 2010 to 2011 - Post-doctoral Research Fellow, Department of Biology and Chemistry (City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon, HONG KONG)
  • 2008 to 2010 - Editorial Commentary Journalist, Journal of Experimental Biology
  • 2007 to 2010 - Aquatic Facilities Curator, Department of Zoology (University of British Columbia)
  • 2004 to 2010 - PhD candidate, Department of Zoology (University of British Columbia)
  • 2004 to 2006 - Research Assistant, AquaNet (Canada Network Centre of Excellence in Aquaculture, Vancouver, B.C. CANADA)
  • 2003 to 2006 - Teaching Assistant, Department of Zoology (University of British Columbia)
  • 2002 to 2003 - Research & Volunteer Coordinator, Operation Wallacea
Research Disciplines
Socio-Economic Objectives
Honours
Awards
  • 2019 - Queensland's Tall Poppy Young Scientist of the Year
  • 2016 to 2017 - Australia’s Top 5 Scientists under 40, Radio National, Australian Broadcasting Corporation and University of New South Wales
  • 2016 - Catch a Rising Star, for Women in Science Queensland National Science Week
  • 2016 - Society for Experimental Biology President’s Medal – Communication and Diversity in Science
  • 2015 - Rising Star in Queensland Science (Queensland Government)
  • 2015 - George A. Bartholomew distinguished young investigator in comparative physiology, biochemistry, and functional and integrative biology, USA
  • 2008 - • Society for Experimental Biology Young Scientist of the Year, 2nd runner up
Fellowships
  • 2015 to 2017 - Australian Research Council Discovery Fellowship (early career, DECRA), for research “Physiological performance of reef fishes under ocean acidification”.
  • 2015 to 2016 - Lizard Island Reef Research Foundation Fellow, AUSTRALIA
  • 2015 to 2016 - L’Oréal – UNESCO for Women in Science – AUSTRALIA & NEW ZEALAND, winner
  • 2014 to 2015 - Institut des Récifs Coralliens du Pacifique / Institute for Pacific Coral Reefs Research Fellow, Moorea, FRENCH POLYNESIA
  • 2011 to 2014 - ARC Super Science Fellowship
Publications

These are the most recent publications associated with this author. To see a detailed profile of all publications stored at JCU, visit ResearchOnline@JCU. Hover over Altmetrics badges to see social impact.

Journal Articles
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ResearchOnline@JCU stores 129+ research outputs authored by Prof Jodie Rummer from 2001 onwards.

Current Funding

Current and recent Research Funding to JCU is shown by funding source and project.

Save Our Seas Foundation - Grant

Using epaulette sharks as an indicator species to predict elasmobranch reproductive changes from climate change

Indicative Funding
$4,295 over 1 year
Summary
Defining life history characteristics of elasmobranchs over centuries of research has been pivotal data to understand underlying biology as well as facilitating proper management and conservation. Within life history characteristics, reproductive biology and endocrinology is a generally lacking field for the majority of elasmobranchs where approximately 46% of this taxonomic group are poorly understood in this area. Our study aims to use a well understood model species to predict how climate change-mediated ocean warming will shift reproductive timing and success in the future. These reproductive models are crucial for implementing recovery of elasmobranchs worldwide in our rapidly changing environment.
Investigators
Carolyn Wheeler and Jodie Rummer in collaboration with John Mandelman (ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies and New England Aquarium)
Keywords
Climate Change; Reproductive Physiology; Elasmobranchs; Ocean warming

Australian Museum - Lizard Island Doctoral Fellowship

Mechanisms for underpinning maintained or enhanced performance of coral reef fishes under future climate change conditions.

Indicative Funding
$16,545 over 3 years
Summary
The partial pressure of carbon dioxide in the oceans is increasing at unprecedented rate. This is expected to have negative impacts on marine organisms. However, some studies have found enhanced aerobic scope of fishes. No study has identified the mechanisms underpinning maintained or enhanced performance of fishes during predicted future conditions. This basic mechanistic knowledge could help informing how fish communities will perform and survive in future climate change conditions and their adaptive capacity.
Investigators
Kelly Hannan, Jodie Rummer and Philip Munday (ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies)
Keywords
Climate Change; Performance; Reef Fish; Ocean Acidification; Oxygen Consumption

Australian Society for Fish Biology - Michael Hall Student Innovation Award

A novel approach to investigate reproduction in a model shark species threatened by ocean warming.

Indicative Funding
$1,000 over 1 year (administered by Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studie)
Summary
Defining life history characteristics of elasmobranchs over centuries of research has been pivotal data to understand underlying biology as well as facilitating proper management and conservation. Within life history characteristics, reproductive biology and endocrinology is a generally lacking field for the majority of elasmobranchs where approximately 46% of this taxonomic group are poorly understood in this area. Our study aims to use a well understood model species to predict how climate change-mediated ocean warming will shift reproductive timing and success in the future. These reproductive models are crucial for implementing recovery of elasmobranchs worldwide in our rapidly changing environment.
Investigators
Carolyn Wheeler and Jodie Rummer in collaboration with John Mandelman (ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies and New England Aquarium)
Keywords
Climate Change; Reproductive physiology; Elasmobranchs; Ocean warming

SeaWorld Research and Rescue Foundation Inc - Research Grant

Mechanisms underpinning maintained or enhanced performance of coral reef fishes under future climate change conditions

Indicative Funding
$22,203 over 2 years
Summary
The partial pressure of carbon dioxide in the oceans is increasing at unprecedented rates. This is expected to have negative impacts on marine organisms. However, some studies have found enhanced aerobic scope of fishes. No study has identified the mechanisms underpinning maintained or enhanced performance of fishes during predicted future conditions. This basic mechanistic knowledge could help inform how fish communities will perform and survive in future climate change conditions and their adaptive capacity. Aims: - Determine the mechanisms of maintained/enhanced oxygen transport in fishes; - Examine oxygen uptake of fishes employing different activity periods under end-of-century pCO2 and temperature conditions.
Investigators
Jodie Rummer and Kelly Hannan (ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies)
Keywords
Climate Change; Ocean Acidification; Performance; Oxygen Consumption; reef fish

King Abdullah University of Science and Technology - Competitive Research Grant

Genomic evidence for adaptation of marine fishes to ocean acidification

Indicative Funding
$536,574 over 3 years (administered by King Abudullah University of Science and Technology)
Summary
Ocean acidification is predicted to have far-reaching impacts on marine biodiversity, especially in vulnerable ecosystems such as coral reefs. Whether marine animals can adapt to the decreasing pH is uncertain and the likely molecular mechanisms responsible for such adaptation are unknown. Recent studies show that ecologically important behaviours of marine fishes can be impaired by CO2 levels projected to occur in the ocean before the end of this century. However, in a unique multi-generational experiment with a common coral reef fish, we have demonstrated that such individuals are more tolerant to high CO2 than others and that this tolerance is heritable. In this study we will use Next-Generation Sequencing to sequence the brain's genomes and transcriptomes from parents and their offspring to test for genetic adaptation in CO2 tolerance.
Investigators
V Orlando, Philip Munday, Michael Berumen and Jodie Rummer (King Abdullah University of Science and Technology and ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies)
Keywords
Ocean Acidification; Coral Reef Fish; Adaptation; Genome
Supervision

Advisory Accreditation: I can be on your Advisory Panel as a Primary or Secondary Advisor.

These Higher Degree Research projects are either current or by students who have completed their studies within the past 5 years at JCU. Linked titles show theses available within ResearchOnline@JCU.

Current
  • Acclimation and Adaptation Mechanisms in the Epaulette Shark (Hemiscyllium ocellatum) Underpinning Metabolic and Locomotive Performance in Response to Ocean Warming (PhD , Primary Advisor/AM/Adv)
  • Impacts of ocean Deoxygenation and Hypoxia on the Physiology of Obligate Ram-ventilating Elasmobranchs (PhD , Primary Advisor/AM/Adv)
  • Exploring Fine Scale Temporal Patterns of Shark Populations in the GBR. (Masters , Primary Advisor/AM/Adv)
  • Quantifying Life History Energetics of an Oviparous Elasmobranch subject to future Warming Waters (PhD , Primary Advisor)
Completed
Data

These are the most recent metadata records associated with this researcher. To see a detailed description of all dataset records, visit Research Data Australia.

Collaboration

The map shows research collaborations by institution from the past 7 years.
Note: Map points are indicative of the countries or states that institutions are associated with.

  • 5+ collaborations
  • 4 collaborations
  • 3 collaborations
  • 2 collaborations
  • 1 collaboration
  • Indicates the Tropics (Torrid Zone)

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Location
  • 19.128, Kevin Stark Research Building (Townsville campus)
  • 19.118, Kevin Stark Research Building (Townsville campus)
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