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Publications

These are the most recent publications associated with this author. To see a detailed profile of all publications stored at JCU, visit ResearchOnline@JCU. Hover over Altmetrics badges to see social impact.

Journal Articles
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ResearchOnline@JCU stores 79+ research outputs authored by A/Prof John Miles from 2003 onwards.

Current Funding

Current and recent Research Funding to JCU is shown by funding source and project.

NHMRC - Career Development Fellowship

Understanding and modulating the human immune system. RD Wright Biomedical Career Development Fellowship Level 2

Indicative Funding
$476,728 over 4 years
Summary
T cells are central in the surveillance and clearance of infectious challenges and cancer. T cells are also engines behind autoimmunity and graft rejection. Understanding and controlling this powerful immune lineage has the potential to unlock new treatments across hundreds of human diseases. This research aims to draw on powerful new technologies including high-dimensional phenotyping and high throughput sequencing to analyse the T cell compartment in high detail. The overarching goals of the research are a better comprehension of the human T cell compartment and the generation of new tools that can control its form and function.
Investigators
John Miles (Australian Institute of Tropical Health & Medicine)
Keywords
T cells; Immune System; infectious disease; chronic conditions

NHMRC - Project Grant -

Using Methods in Genetic Epidemiology to Elucidate the Relationship Between Viral Infection and Risk of Autoimmune Disease

Indicative Funding
$412,038 over 2 years (administered by University of Queensland)
Summary
The aim of this project is to investigate a possible causal link between six ubiquitous human viruses and the development of four autoimmune diseases. Should our results be consistent with a causal relationship, we expect that approaches aimed at controlling viral infection through vaccination, antiviral drugs or treatment with virus-specific T cell infusions may become effective treatments or preventative strategies against autoimmune diseases in the future.
Investigators
David Evans, John Miles, George Smith and Nicole Warrington (The University of Queensland, Australian Institute of Tropical Health & Medicine and University of Bristol)
Keywords
Virus; Autoimmune Disease

NHMRC - Project Grant -

Defining the molecular and functional features of protective HIV-specific T cells

Indicative Funding
$60,000 (administered by Monash University)
Summary
Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) directly attacks our immune system, impairing our natural defense against infection and disease. HIV has claimed over 39 million lives worldwide since its discovery, and no vaccine is currently available. Despite this, there are some individuals with a particular genetic advantage able to control HIV infection who never get sick. Understanding how these individuals are able to naturally control HIV may lead to novel treatments or potential vaccines against this disease.
Investigators
Stephanie Gras, David M Price and John Miles (Monash University, Cardiff University and Australian Institute of Tropical Health & Medicine)
Keywords
T Cell Immunity; T Cell Receptors; HIV

NHMRC - Project Grant -

The bioactivity and binding partners of Irukandji and Box Jellyfish venom

Indicative Funding
$605,307 over 3 years
Summary
Venom from the Box Jellyfish and Irukandji jellyfish are considered the most lethal known to science yet precious little is known on the nature of these secretions or how they harm humans. This study aims to fully characterise bioactive proteins in jellyfish venom and attempt to block their activity using regulatory-approved and experimental drugs.
Investigators
John Miles, Jason Mulvenna and Irina Vetter (Australian Institute of Tropical Health & Medicine, Queensland Institute of Medical Research and The University of Queensland)
Keywords
Venom; Cytokine production; Inflammation

NHMRC - Project Grant -

A new approach to the design and evaluation of T cell vaccines for cancer and infectious disease

Indicative Funding
$16,250 over 2 years (administered by University of Queensland)
Summary
There is irrefutable evidence that effective cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) are essential for the eradication of cancers and many pathogens for which there are no effective vaccines. Dendritic cells (DC) are rare white blood cells that play a pivotal role in the induction of CTL. We will develop a novel strategy for inducing high quality human CTL by manipulating the key DC subtype responsible for initiating these responses. We originally characterised the human CD141+ DC subtype that are widely considered to be the most clinically relevant human DC subset for inducing CTL and are therefore prime targets for vaccine development. Antibodies (Ab) that engage cell surface receptors expressed on DC can be used as vehicles to carry antigenic cargo directly to DC in vivo. We discovered the novel C-type lectin like receptor, CLEC9A, that is specifically expressed by CD141+ DC. We propose that anti-CLEC9A Ab can be used to deliver antigen (Ag) directly to CD141+ DC in vivo and exploited as a new vaccine platform. We have already demonstrated proofof-concept of this approach in mouse models and now aim to translate this platform to humans.
Investigators
Kristin Radford, Mireille Lahoud, David M Price and John Miles (The University of Queensland, Monash University, Cardiff University and Australian Institute of Tropical Health & Medicine)
Keywords
Vaccine design; Cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) evaluation; Immunotherapy

NHMRC - Project Grant -

Following the T cell repertoire over the human life course

Indicative Funding
$61,537
Summary
T cells are critical to human health being our second and last line against infectious disease and cancer. However, we know very little about how this important immune compartment operates on a top-down scale. This project will use new technology to resolve this immune compartment to high detail. We will then use this new method to track the T cell compartment from early life and across years of adult life to see how this vital immune compartment evolves along the human life course.
Investigators
John Miles and Scott Burrows (Australian Institute of Tropical Health & Medicine and Queensland Institute of Medical Research)
Keywords
T Cell Immunity; T Cell Receptors; T Cell development
Supervision

Advisory Accreditation: I can be on your Advisory Panel as a Primary or Secondary Advisor.

These Higher Degree Research projects are either current or by students who have completed their studies within the past 5 years at JCU. Linked titles show theses available within ResearchOnline@JCU.

Current
  • Deconstructing the Immunopathogenesis of Pathogenic Lung Infections (PhD , Primary Advisor)
  • First aid of tropical jellyfish stings (Masters , Advsor Mentor)
  • High-Throughput and High-Definition Breakdown of Human T Cell Repertoires in Health and Disease (PhD , Primary Advisor)
Collaboration

The map shows research collaborations by institution from the past 7 years.
Note: Map points are indicative of the countries or states that institutions are associated with.

  • 5+ collaborations
  • 4 collaborations
  • 3 collaborations
  • 2 collaborations
  • 1 collaboration
  • Indicates the Tropics (Torrid Zone)

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