About

Professor Jonathan Golledge is Head of the Queensland Research Centre for Peripheral Vascular Disease and its pre-clinical arm The Vascular Biology Unit (VBU) at the School of Medicine and Dentistry, James Cook University. Professor Golledge joined JCU in 2002 and established the Vascular Biology Unit with the aim of carrying out research intended to be translated into improved management of aortic aneurysm and other peripheral vascular conditions. We continue to seek high quality students and researchers to join our group. Trained as a vascular specialist, Professor Golledge took 2 years out of specialist training to obtain experience in research techniques as part of a Cambridge MChir (Doctoral equivalent), UK. His research commitment is illustrated by a large number of presentations at International and National meetings and publications in peer-reviewed journals, including a large number in top specialised journals.

Professor Golledge holds a conjoint position between the School of Medicine and Dentistry and Queensland Health, where he works as a vascular surgeon. In addition to providing a high quality clinical service his principal aspiration is to improve management of peripheral vascular diseases. The research impact of this is evidenced by external grant support from the NIH, NHMRC, Queensland Government, NHF and other bodies. Of note in 2010 Professor Golledge led a successful bid to establish a NHMRC funded centre of research excellence for Peripheral Vascular Disease.

Research Disciplines
Socio-Economic Objectives
Honours
Fellowships
  • 2002 - Fellow of the Royal Australasian College of Surgeons
  • 1994 - Fellow of the Royal College of Surgeons of England
Memberships
  • 2012 - Editorial board member, Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis and Vascular Biology
  • 2009 - Member of The Australian and International Stroke Genetics Collaboration
  • 2009 - Member of The Research Committee of the Faculty Medicine, Health and Molecular Sciences
  • 2007 - Member of the Board of Surgical Research of the Royal Australasian College of Surgeons
  • 2002 - Member of the Australian Vascular Biology Society
  • 2002 - Member of the School of Medicine Research Committee, James Cook University
  • 1996 - Member of the European Society of Vascular Surgery
  • 2002 to 2009 - Member of the ethics committee, The Mater Hospital, Townsville
  • 2003 to 2004 - Member of the Biological Sciences selection panel for internal grants, James Cook University
  • 1996 to 2001 - Member of the Vascular Surgical Society of Great Britain and Ireland
Other
  • 2012 - Editorial board Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis and Vascular Biology
  • 2011 - Credentialling Committee The Townsville Hospital
  • 2007 - Editorial board member Atherosclerosis
  • 2003 - Reviewer The Lancet, Circulation, Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis and Vascular Biology, Atherosclerosis, Journal of Vascular Surgery, European Journal of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery, American Journal of Cardiology, American Journal of Pathology
  • 2003 - External reviewer for numerous granting bodies including the National Health and Medical Research Council, National Heart Foundation and other international funding bodies such as the Welcome Trust
  • 2002 - Chairman of the Austalian and New Zealand Society of Vascular Surgery Research Group
  • 2000 - Reviewer Stroke
  • 1997 - Reviewer The Journal of Vascular Surgery and the European Journal of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery
  • 2003 to 2009 - Language Editor European Journal of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery
  • 2002 to 2007 - Chairman of the BMedSci Committee, James Cook University
Publications

These are the most recent publications associated with this author. To see a detailed profile of all publications stored at JCU, visit ResearchOnline@JCU. Hover over Altmetrics badges to see social impact.

Journal Articles
More

ResearchOnline@JCU stores 432+ research outputs authored by Prof Jon Golledge from 2003 onwards.

Current Funding

Current and recent Research Funding to JCU is shown by funding source and project.

Townsville Hospital and Health Service - Study Education Research Trust Account (SERTA)

Metformin for treating peripheral artery disease-related walking impairment (MERIT)

Indicative Funding
$50,000 over 3 years
Summary
lBockage of the leg arteries (peripheral artery disease; PAD) leads to severe pain, walking impairment, and a substantial risk of leg amputation and death. Over 20,000 North Queenslanders have blocked leg arteries and the problem is over-represented in rural, remote and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander People. There are currently no effective PAD medications. Multiple lines of evidence suggest that metformin, a cheap and safe medication, promotes formation of new vessels, improves microcirculation and muscle function and limits pain. This placebo-controlled, randomised clinical trial will examine the efficacy of metformin in improving walking ability in patients with blocked leg arteries.
Investigators
Jon Golledge (College of Medicine & Dentistry)
Keywords
Prevention; Complications; Peripheral Arterial Disease; Risk Factors

Heart Foundation - Secondary Prevention Strategic Grant

Peripheral Arterial Disease- a holistic medical management program

Indicative Funding
$1,000,000 over 3 years
Summary
Approximately 200 million people worldwide and 1 million Australians have blockage of their lower limb arteries. Leg artery blockage causes substantial leg pain, walking impairment and reduced health-related quality of life and leads to a high risk of heart attack, stroke, hospital admission, amputation and death. Prior clinical trials have demonstrated that a range of secondary prevention treatments including medications and exercise therapy can substantially improve quality of life and physical performance and reduce the risk of adverse events. Our previous research shows that these treatments are not effectively implemented in Australians that have leg artery blockage. Based on a systematic review of the available evidence and our prior research, we have developed the PAD-medical program. This program consists of personalised treatments sessions delivered via telehealth to monitor control of key risk factors, optimise prescribed medications, supervise an exercise program and provide behaviour support counselling aimed to educate and aid achieving exercise goals and support smoking abstinence. This controlled, randomised clinical trialwill examine the efficacy of PAD-medical in improving control of the key risk factor for adverse events, quality of life and physical performance in people with blocked leg arteries over six months. The trial will also include a health economic assessment. Positive findings fromthis trial will identify a new treatment for a problem that affects 10% of adults. If shown to be effective, an application will be made to the Medical Services Advisory Committee to seek national funding for the program. PAD-medical can be potentially implemented across Australia to any locality withWiFi access, in order to substantially reduce the frequency of adverse events and improve quality of life of the large number of people who have blocked leg arteries.
Investigators
Jon Golledge in collaboration with Belinda Parmenter, Bruce Neale, Clare Arnott, Toby Richards, Gemma Figtree, Richard Norman, Robyn Gallagher, Christopher Askew and Gian Luca Di Tanna (College of Medicine & Dentistry, The University of New South Wales, The University of Western Australia, The University of Sydney, Curtin University of Technology and University of the Sunshine Coast)
Keywords
Peripheral artery disease; Complications; Prevention; Risk factors

National Health & Medical Research Council - Clinical Trials and Cohort Studies

The Metformin Aneurisym Trial (MAT)

Indicative Funding
$4,997,653 over 5 years
Summary
20 million people worldwide and 100,000 Australians have an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). The main complication of AAA, aortic rupture, leads to 200,000 deaths/year worldwide. AAA prevalence and mortality rates in Australasia are 4-fold higher than the world average, so research to improve management is a key priorty. Most AAAs are detected when theya re small, when an effective treatment would prevent the need for surgery. There is currently no effective drug therapy for AA, and 70% of small AAAs grow to a size requiring surgical repair which carries inherent risks of death and major complications. A large amount of observational data from patients and laboratory models suggest that metformin may be an effective drug therapy for AAA. The metformin aneurysm trial (MAT) will be a large-scale, multi-centre randomised trail done as a collaboration between investigators in Australia, New Zealand, Swden and the United Kingdom across 55 sites over a 5 year trial period. Patients with AAA measuring between 39 and 49mmm in diameter will be enrolled over 24 months, assiged at random to 1500mn of metformin extended release (XR) or placebo each day followed for a mean of 3.5 years. The primary outcome will be AAA rupture or repair. The sample size of 1,954 will provide 90% pwer (p=0.05) to detect a 25% or greater reduction in the relative risk of the primary outcome. A positive finding from MAT would identify metformin as the first effective medical treatment for AAA. Since metformin is low cost, safe and available worldwide, the trial will have direct clinical implications for tens of millions of people around the world for whom no preventative therapy is currently available.
Investigators
Jon Golledge, Bruce Neal, Qiang Li, Gregory Jones, Matthew Bown, Anders Wanhainen, Richard Norman, Helen Monaghan, Dylan Morris and Joseph Moxon (College of Medicine & Dentistry, The George Institute for International Health, University of Otago, University of Leicester, University of Uppsala, Curtin University of Technology and Townsville Hospital and Health Services)
Keywords
Clinical Trial; Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm; Metformin

Queensland Health - Senior Clinical Research Fellowships

Peripheral Arterial Disease

Indicative Funding
$4,250,000 over 12 years
Summary
Developing novel therapies ad management pathways for Peripheral Arterial Disease. Aim 1. to assess the safety and efficacy of novel medications for PAD within carefully designed clinical trials and registries; Aim 2. to utilise clinical risk factors and novel biomarkers to develop models to better predict outcomes for PAD: Aim 3. To develop appropriate guidelines for the evidence-based management of PAD in Australia and assess novel ways to implement them within Queensland.
Investigators
Jonathan Golledge in collaboration with Paul Norman, Timothy Buckenham, Robert Fitridge, Bernard Bourke, Mark Nelson, Reinhold Muller, Anthony Leicht, Frances Quirk, Paula Clancy, Erik Biros, Corey Moran, Lesley Stainkey, Phillip Walker, Craig McLachlan, Yew Toh Wong and Melina Wilson (College of Medicine & Dentistry, The University of Western Australia, Christchurch Hospital, Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Gosford Hospital, Menzies School of Health Research, College of Public Health, Medical & Vet Sciences, College of Healthcare Sciences, Townsville - Mackay Medicare Local, The University of Queensland, University of Technology, Sydney, Southmead Hospital, Bristol and St George's Hospital Medical School)
Keywords
Peripheral Arterial Disease

Tropical Australian Academic Health Centre Limited - Research Seed Grants

(COMFITE) Efficacy, acceptability and adherence with custom-made footwear in people with a history of diabetes-related foot disease.

Indicative Funding
$50,000 over 2 years
Summary
Approximately 8% (n=80,000) of Northern Australians have diabetes of whom about a quarter (n=20,000) will develop foot disease putting them at risk of amputation and death and costing ~$24 million each year. The most common cause of diabetes-related foot complications is excessive pressure on an area of an insensate foot. Footwear designed to limit pressure on the feet has been shown to reduce the risk of foot ulcers. The most appropriate type of footwear is however unknown. This pilot clinical trial examines the efficacy and acceptability of footwear designed to the shape of an individuals? feet using three-dimensional printing.
Investigators
Jon Golledge and Joseph Moxon (College of Medicine & Dentistry)
Keywords
Diabetes Foot Disease; Diabetes; Aboriginal And Torres Strait Health; Podiatry

Townsville Hospital and Health Service - Study Education Research Trust Account (SERTA)

Developing innovative approaches to preventing diabetes-related foot disease

Indicative Funding
$50,000 over 2 years (administered by Townsville Hospital and Health Service)
Summary
This project aims to obtain insight into stakeholders? opinions and priorities regarding appropriate prevention methods for diabetes related foot disease (DFD) and how these are best delivered to effectively prevent it. Ultimately, this intends to achieve an enduring partnership between researchers and key stakeholders to facilitate the co-design of an effective DFD prevention program.
Investigators
Jon Golledge in collaboration with Malindu Fernando, Aaron Drovandi, Rebecca Evans, Kunwargit Sangla, Ruth Connors, Valli Manickam, Victoria White and Peter Lazzarini (College of Medicine & Dentistry, Townsville University Hospital and Metro North Health Service District)
Keywords
Diabetic Foot Disease; Arterial Disease; Diabetes

Townsville Hospital and Health Service - Study Education Research Trust Account (SERTA)

Metformin in the mAnaGement of abdomInal aortiC aneurysm (MAGIC)

Indicative Funding
$50,000 over 2 years
Summary
MAGIC is a randomised trial to test metformin as a therapy for aortic aneurysm.
Investigators
Jon Golledge (College of Medicine & Dentistry)
Keywords
Abdominal Aortic Aneurism; Metformin

Heart Foundation - Vanguard Grant

Metformin for treating peripheral artery disease-related walking impairment (MERIT)

Indicative Funding
$75,000 over 2 years
Summary
Blockage of the lower limb arteries (peripheral artery disease; PAD) leads to severe leg pain, walking impairment, and a substantial risk of leg amputation and death. Approximately 200 million people worldwide and approximately 1 million Australians have blocked leg arteries. This problem has recognised treatment deficiencies in comparison to other common diseases, including the absence of effective medications to increase blood supply to the legs, reduce leg pain, improve walking ability and reduce the risk of major amputation. Multiple lines of evidence suggest that metformin, a cheap and safe medication, promotes formation of new vessels, improves microcirculation and muscle function, and limits pain. In preliminary studies, metformin significantly increased blood supply to the limb of a pre-clinical model of blocked leg arteries. We have also associated metformin prescription with a 4-fold reduction in the rate of major lower limb amputation in patients with blocked arteries. This placebo-controlled, randomised clinical trial will examine the efficacy of metformin in improving walking ability in patients with blocked leg arteries over 6 months. Positive findings from this trial will identify a new treatment for a problem that affects 10-20% of adults aged over 50 years.
Investigators
Jon Golledge, Dylan Morris and Joseph Moxon (College of Medicine & Dentistry and University of Oxford)
Keywords
peripheral artery disease; Clinical Trial; Medication

National Health & Medical Research Council - Practitioner Fellowship

Developing improved management for peripheral artery diseases

Indicative Funding
$569,219 over 5 years
Summary
This fellowship aims to address current deficiencies in the care of PAD patients by: Aim 1: Testing new PAD treatments in patient-relevant pre-clinical models; Aim 2: Examining the efficacy of new treatments in human clinical trials; Aim 3: Discovering novel targets for diagnostic tests, prognostic markers and treatments.
Investigators
Jon Golledge (College of Medicine & Dentistry)
Keywords
Peripheral Arterial Disease; Aortic Aneurysm

National Health & Medical Research Council - Equipment Grant

2019 Equipment Grant - QRCPVD

Indicative Funding
$20,004 over 1 year
Summary
The UHEAL Consortium includes a range of researchers (ranging from established researchers through to HDR students) within JCU (predominantly College of Medicine and Dentistry, AITHM and College of Science and Engineering), in addition to external partners (including Townsville University Hospital, TAIHS, QUT and the A-Star institute). The over-arching aim of UHEAL is to conduct a translational research program aimed at improving the clinical management of patients with chronic wounds. Utilisation of this equipment in patients will facilitate the delivery of UHEAL Consortium clinical objectives, and data generated through the use of this equipment will directly benefit multiple internal and external partners. This money will allow the acquisition of the equipment required to complete our current study concerning Diabetic Foot.
Investigators
Jon Golledge (College of Medicine & Dentistry)
Keywords
Diabetes; Diabetic Foot Ulcer; Peripheral Arterial Disease; Complications; Preventions

Townsville Hospital and Health Service - Study Education Research Trust Account (SERTA)

Peak Wall Stress as a prognostic indicator of abdominal Aortic Aneurysm rupture risk

Indicative Funding
$50,000 over 3 years
Summary
Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA) affects 20 million people worldwide and 100,000 people in Australia. Annually, AAA rupture leads to 200,000 deaths worldwide and 2000 deaths in Australia. In clinical practice, maximum AAA diameter is the preferred surrogate measure for disease progression and rupture risk, and is used to guide surgical intervention. Approximately 10% of AAAs will rupture before they reach the current threshold for repair, whereas 60% of large AAAs remain stable during their lifetime, suggesting that diameter alone is an imperfect tool to decide which AAAs require surgical intervention. The specific aims of the project are Aim 1: To investigate if PWS is greater in patients with ruptured compared to intact AAAs matched for diameter; Aim 2: To evaluate the impact of a common anti-hypertensive medication {Telmisartan) on PWS and rupture risk in patients with small AAAs.
Investigators
Tejas Singh, Jon Golledge and Joseph Moxon in collaboration with Thomas Gasser (College of Medicine & Dentistry and Royal Institute of Technology)
Keywords
Metformin; Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm; Ruptures

Townsville Hospital and Health Service - Study Education Research Trust Account (SERTA)

Assessment of the efficacy of a novel treatment for Peripheral Artery Disease (PAD)

Indicative Funding
$50,000 over 3 years
Summary
Blockage of leg arteries (peripheral artery disease - PAD) leads to severe exertional leg pain (intermittent claudication), impaired walking ability, reduced health-related quality of life, and high risk of amputation and death. Multiple lines of evidence suggest that metformin, a cheap and safe medication, promotes formation of new vessels, improves microcirculation and muscle function,s and limits pain.
Investigators
Jon Golledge, Joseph Moxon, Tejas Singh, Rachel Wong, Kunwargit Sangla and Veronica White (College of Medicine & Dentistry and Townsville Hospital and Health Services)
Keywords
Metformin; peripheral artery disease; Intermittent Claudication
Supervision

Advisory Accreditation: I can be on your Advisory Panel as a Primary or Secondary Advisor.

These Higher Degree Research projects are either current or by students who have completed their studies within the past 5 years at JCU. Linked titles show theses available within ResearchOnline@JCU.

Current
  • Measuring Person-Centred Healthcare (PhD , Advisor Mentor)
  • Peak Wall Stress as a Prognostic Indicator of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Rupture Risk (PhD , Primary Advisor/AM/Adv)
  • Diabetic foot disease and prevention of its complications (PhD , Primary Advisor/AM/Adv)
  • Assessment and Intervention of Dietary Patterns in Patients with Peripheral Arterial Disease and Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (PhD , Primary Advisor/AM/Adv)
  • Development and Implementation of Plasma Polymer Thin Films for Enhanced Biocompatibility in Medical Implants (PhD , Secondary Advisor)
  • Identification of Mediators Important in Determining Carotid Plaque Instability (PhD , Secondary Advisor)
Completed
Data

These are the most recent metadata records associated with this researcher. To see a detailed description of all dataset records, visit Research Data Australia.

Collaboration

The map shows research collaborations by institution from the past 7 years.
Note: Map points are indicative of the countries or states that institutions are associated with.

  • 5+ collaborations
  • 4 collaborations
  • 3 collaborations
  • 2 collaborations
  • 1 collaboration
  • Indicates the Tropics (Torrid Zone)

Connect with me
Share my profile
Share my profile:
jcu.me/jonathan.golledge

Email
Phone
Location
Advisory Accreditation
Advisor Mentor
Find me on…
Icon for NLA Trove People record Icon for Scopus Author page

Similar to me

  1. Dr Tejas Singh
    College of Medicine & Dentistry
  2. Dr Joseph Moxon
    College of Medicine & Dentistry
  3. Dr Smriti Murali Krishna
    College of Medicine & Dentistry
  4. Dr Corey Moran
    College of Medicine & Dentistry
  5. Dr Theophilus Emeto
    College of Public Health, Medical & Vet Sciences