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Research Disciplines
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Publications

These are the most recent publications associated with this author. To see a detailed profile of all publications stored at JCU, visit ResearchOnline@JCU. Hover over Altmetrics badges to see social impact.

Journal Articles
Current Funding

Current and recent Research Funding to JCU is shown by funding source and project.

Townsville General Hospital - Private Practice Trust Fund

Is helicopter transport safe for divers with decompression illness? A prospective simulation study evaluating intravascular bubble formation in healthy volunteers exposed to vibration versus stillness following a Table 14 (241.3kPa) hyperbaric treatment

Indicative Funding
$22,691
Summary
Diving is a common recreational activity. Unfortunately diving does have risks which include decompression illness (DCI). DCI involves formation of gas bubbles. Treatment usually involves re-pressurisation in special chambers designed to 'squash' the bubbles which can only be done in certain hospitals. Divers may need to be transported urgently by helicopters from the reef to hospital. However, some people believe that the vibration of the helicopter may increase the number of bubbles and make symptoms worse before divers can access treatment. This study will determine if this is true - will bubbles actually be increased by the vibration associated with helicopter flight?
Investigators
Denise Blake, Lawrence Brown, Peter Aitken, Peter Grabau and Owen Kenny in collaboration with David Cooksley, Peter Bisaro, Gregory Huppatz and Corry Van den Broek (College of Science & Engineering, Private Consultant / Practitioner, College of Public Health, Medical & Vet Sciences, Royal Brisbane Hospital, Townsville General Hospital, Emergency Management Australia and Royal Hobart Hospital)
Keywords
Diving; embolism, air; decompression sicklness; air ambulance; hyperbaric oxygenation; ultrasonography, doppler

Emergency Medicine Foundation - Research Grant

Feasibillity of linked data from aeromedical retrieval and transport in Central Queensland

Indicative Funding
$50,000 over 2 years
Summary
Aeromedical retrievals are a vital part of an advanced emergency system. Rural communities rely on the service for equitable access to healthcare. Currently, there is limited understanding of the aeromedical patient journey and outcomes. This first of its kind study seeks to take the next step in patient-centred outcomes research by linking together existing, but independent ED, aeromedical, hospital and deaths databases. The aims of the study are: 1. To develop linked data infrastructure 2. Describe aeromedical patient outcomes 3. Identify steps in the patient journey e.g. trauma, multi-hospital, back transfer and patients that require frequent flights.
Investigators
Richard Franklin, Kristin Edwards, Melissa Edwards, Peter Aitken and Mark Elcock (College of Public Health, Medical & Vet Sciences and Queensland Health)
Keywords
Aeromedical Retrieval; Rural Health; Rockhampton; Air Ambulance; Patient Outcomes; Queensland

Emergency Medicine Foundation - Capacity Building Grant

Capacity Building Grant The Townsville Hospital

Indicative Funding
$210,000 over 3 years
Summary
1)Development of a research culture within the ED which includes research education, develops research outcomes, fosters research support and creates a visible research profile. 2) Development of a research infrastructure and research identify of TTH ED within both TTH and broader health community, that enables a clear point of a contact for collaborative research and impetus for doing so. 3) Development of research outcomes and outputs that establish a 'track record' enabling future funding success to occur ensuring long term success of the program.
Investigators
Jeremy Furyk, Richard Franklin, Peter Aitken, Peter Leggat and Richard Speare in collaboration with Ben Close, Colin Banks, Denise Blake and Carl O'Kane (Townsville General Hospital, College of Public Health and Medical & Vet Sciences)
Keywords
Medicine; Clinical; Emergency Department; Prevention

Far North Queensland Hospital Foundation - Research Grant

Quantifying modifiable public health infrastructure risks and how this can reduce the impact of disasters on people with non-communicable disease.

Indicative Funding
$3,000
Summary
This project will quantify modifiable public health infrastructure risks based on how they can reduce the impact of disasters on people with non-communicable diseases. The findings will inform a framework for reducing the impact of disasters on the health and well-being of people with NCDs.
Investigators
Benjamin Ryan, Richard Franklin, Kerrianne Watt, Erin Smith, Peter Aitken, Peter Leggat and Frederick Burkle (College of Public Health, Medical & Vet Sciences, Edith Cowan University and Harvard University)
Keywords
Chronic Disease; Disasters; floods; cyclonic storms
Supervision

These Higher Degree Research projects are either current or by students who have completed their studies within the past 5 years at JCU. Linked titles show theses available within ResearchOnline@JCU.

Current
  • Resuscitation Strategies for Out of Hospital Cardiac Arrest (OHCA) and Improving Patient Outcomes. (PhD , Secondary Advisor)
  • Addressing the Impact of Disasters on Public Health Infrastructure and Non Communicable Diseases (PhD , Secondary Advisor)
Collaboration

The map shows research collaborations by institution from the past 7 years.
Note: Map points are indicative of the countries or states that institutions are associated with.

  • 5+ collaborations
  • 4 collaborations
  • 3 collaborations
  • 2 collaborations
  • 1 collaboration
  • Indicates the Tropics (Torrid Zone)

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