Research Data

Dataset describing detection or RRV and WNV in mosquito excreta

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General
Title
Dataset describing detection or RRV and WNV in mosquito excreta
Type
Dataset
Date Record Created
2019-08-16
Date Record Modified
2019-08-23
Language
English
Coverage
Date Coverage
2017 to 2018
Time Period
(no information)
Geospatial Location
Description
Descriptions
  1. Type: brief

    Mosquito excreta was collected from mosquitoes infected with arboviruses and tested for the presence of viral RNA by RT-rtPCR.

  2. Type: full

    Abstract [Related Publication]: Emerging and re-emerging arthropod-borne viruses (arboviruses) cause human and animal disease globally. Field and laboratory investigation of mosquito-borne arboviruses requires analysis of mosquito samples, either individually, in pools, or a body component, or secretion such as saliva. We assessed the applicability of mosquito excreta as a sample type that could be utilized during studies of Ross River and West Nile viruses, which could be applied to the study of other arboviruses. Mosquitoes were fed separate blood meals spiked with Ross River virus and West Nile virus. Excreta was collected daily by swabbing the bottom of containers containing batches and individual mosquitoes at different time points. The samples were analyzed by real-time RT-PCR or cell culture enzyme immunoassay. Viral RNA in excreta from batches of mosquitoes was detected continuously from day 2 to day 15 post feeding. Viral RNA was detected in excreta from at least one individual mosquito at all timepoints, with 64% and 27% of samples positive for RRV and WNV, respectively. Excretion of viral RNA was correlated with viral dissemination in the mosquito. The proportion of positive excreta samples was higher than the proportion of positive saliva samples, suggesting that excreta offers an attractive sample for analysis and could be used as an indicator of potential transmission. Importantly, only low levels of infectious virus were detected by cell culture, suggesting a relatively low risk to personnel handling mosquito excreta. Mosquito excreta is easily collected and provides a simple and efficient method for assessing viral dissemination, with applications ranging from vector competence experiments to complementing sugar-based arbovirus surveillance in the field, or potentially as a sample system for virus discovery.

    The dataset consists of a 6 worksheets and includes a description of the parameters for each of the 5 experiments listed below and the data for each experiment:

    • Description (parameters)
    • RRV-groups
    • WNV-groups
    • RRV-individuals
    • WNV-individuals Viability of viral RNA in mosquito excreta

    The full methodology is available in the Open Access publication from the Related Publications link below.

  3. Type: note

    This dataset is available as a spreadsheet saved in both MS Excel (.xlsx) and Open Document (.ods) formats.

Related Publications
  1. Ramirez Lopez, Ana L., Hall-Mendelin, Sonja, Doggett, Stephen L., Hewitson, Glen R., Mcmahon, Jamie L., Ritchie, Scott A., and van den Hurk, Andrew F. (2018) Mosquito excreta: a sample type with many potential applications for the investigation of Ross River virus and West Nile virus ecology. PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases, 12 (8). e0006771.
    Open Access
Related Websites
(no information)
Related Data
(no information)
Related Services
(no information)
Technical metadata
(no information)
People
Creators
  1. Associated with: Miss Ana Ramirez Lopez , ana.ramirez1@my.jcu.edu.au , College of Public Health, Medical & Vet Sciences, Australian Institute of Tropical Health & Medicine
Primary Contact
Ms Ana Ramirez Lopez, ana.ramirez1@my.jcu.edu.au
Supervisors
  1. Prof Scott Ritchie , scott.ritchie@jcu.edu.au
Collaborators
  1. Sonja Hall-Mendelin, Public Health Virology, Forensic and Scientific Services, Department of Health, Queensland, Australia
  2. Stephen L. Doggett, Department of Medical Entomology, NSW Health Pathology-ICPMR, Westmead Hospital, Westmead, New South Wales, Australia
  3. Glen R. Hewitson, Public Health Virology, Forensic and Scientific Services, Department of Health, Queensland, Australia
  4. Jamie L. McMahon, Public Health Virology, Forensic and Scientific Services, Department of Health, Queensland, Australia
  5. Andrew F. van den Hurk, Public Health Virology, Forensic and Scientific Services, Department of Health, Queensland, Australia
Subject
Fields of Research
  1. 069999 - Biological Sciences not elsewhere classified (069999)
  2. 119999 - Medical and Health Sciences not elsewhere classified (119999)
Socio-Economic Objective
  1. 929999 - Health not elsewhere classified (929999)
Keywords
  1. mosquito
  2. excreta
  3. Ross River virus
  4. West Nile virus
  5. arbovirus
Research Activity
(no information)
Research Themes
Tropical Health, Medicine and Biosecurity
Rights
License
CC BY-NC-ND: Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivatives 3.0 AU
License - Other
(no information)
Access Rights/Conditions
Open access. If the data is not freely accessible via the link provided, please contact the nominated data manager or researchdata@jcu.edu.au for assistance.
Type
open
Rights
(no information)
Data
Data Location
Online Locations
Attachments
  1. Data_arbovirus_mosquito_excreta_.xlsx (Data File, Public)
  2. Data_arbovirus_mosquito_excreta.ods (Data File, Public)
Stored At
(no information)
Citation
Cite:
Ramirez Lopez, A. (2019): Dataset describing detection or RRV and WNV in mosquito excreta. James Cook University. (dataset). http://dx.doi.org/10.25903/5d5f31376caa4
Digital Object Identifier (DOI):
10.25903/5d5f31376caa4