Research Data

Myrmecia sample locations and microsatellite data

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General
Title
Myrmecia sample locations and microsatellite data
Type
Dataset
Date Record Created
2017-03-22
Date Record Modified
2017-11-23
Language
English
Coverage
Date Coverage
(no information)
Time Period
(no information)
Geospatial Location
  • 19.02°S, 146.14°E
  • Paluma, Queensland, Australia
Description
Descriptions
  1. Type: full

    Geographic location and microsatellite data for 20 sampled colonies (23 nests) from Qian Z, Schlüns H, Schlick-Steiner BC, Steiner FM, Robson SKA, Schlüns EA, Crozier RH (2011) Intraspecific support for the polygyny-vs.-polyandry hypothesis in the bulldog ant Myrmecia brevinoda.

    Abstract [Related Publication]: The number of queens per colony and the number of matings per queen are the most important determinants of the genetic structure of ant colonies, and understanding their interrelationship is essential to the study of social evolution. The polygyny-versus-polyandry hypothesis argues that polygyny and polyandry should be negatively associated since both can result in increased intracolonial genetic variability and have costs. However, evidence for this long-debated hypothesis has been lacking at the intraspecific level. Here, we investigated the colony genetic structure in the Australian bulldog ant Myrmecia brevinoda. The numbers of queens per colony varied from 1 to 6. Nestmate queens within polygynous colonies were on average related (rqq = 0.171±0.019), but the overall relatedness between queens and their mates was indistinguishable from zero (rqm = 0.037±0.030). Queens were inferred to mate with 1 to 10 males. A lack of genetic isolation by distance among nests indicated the prevalence of independent colony foundation. In accordance with the polygyny-versus-polyandry hypothesis, the number of queens per colony was significantly negatively associated with the estimated number of matings (Spearman rank correlation R = -0.490, P = 0.028). This study thus provides rare intraspecific evidence for the polygyny-versus-polyandry hypothesis. We suggest that high costs of multiple matings and the strong effect of multiple mating on intracolonial genetic diversity may be essential to the negative association between polygyny and polyandry, and that any attempt to empirically test this hypothesis should place emphasis upon these two key underlying aspects.

    The full methodology is available in the publication shown in the Related Publications link below.

  2. Type: note

    This dataset is available from Dryad in MS Excel (.xls) format. Dryad data package: Qian Z, Schlüns H, Schlick-Steiner BC, Steiner FM, Robson SKA, Schlüns EA, Crozier RH (2011) Data from: Intraspecific support for the polygyny-vs.-polyandry hypothesis in the bulldog ant Myrmecia brevinoda. Dryad Digital Repository. http://dx.doi.org/10.5061/dryad.rk0pq

Related Publications
  1. Qian, Zeng-qiang, Schlüns, Helge, Schlick-Steiner, Birgit C., Steiner, Florian M., Robson, Simon K.A., Schlüns, Ellen A., and Crozier, Ross H. (2011) Intraspecific support for the polygyny-vs.-polyandry hypothesis in the bulldog ant Myrmecia brevinoda. Molecular Ecology, 20 (17). pp. 3681-3691.
Related Websites
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Related Data
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Related Services
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Technical metadata
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People
Creators
  1. Associated with: Prof Simon Robson , simon.robson@jcu.edu.au , Terrestrial Ecosystems & Climate Change (223400), Centre for Tropical Biodiversity and Climate Change
Primary Contact
Prof Simon Robson, simon.robson@jcu.edu.au
Supervisors
(no information)
Collaborators
  1. Zeng-Qiang Qian, James Cook University, QLD, Australia
  2. Helge Schlüns, James Cook University, QLD, Australia and University of Agricultural Sciences and Veterinary Medicine, Romania
  3. Birgit, C. Schlick-Steiner, Unviersity of Innsbruck, Austria
  4. Florian M. Steiner, Unviersity of Innsbruck, Austria
  5. Ellen, A. Schlüns, James Cook University, Australia and and University of Agricultural Sciences and Veterinary Medicine, Romania
  6. Ross H. Crozier, James Cook University, QLD, Australia
Subject
Fields of Research
  1. 060411 - Population, Ecological and Evolutionary Genetics (060411)
  2. 060304 - Ethology and Sociobiology (060304)
Socio-Economic Objective
  1. 970106 - Expanding Knowledge in the Biological Sciences (970106)
Keywords
  1. genetic relatedness
  2. microsatellites
  3. polyandry
  4. polygyny
  5. Myrmecia brevinoda
Research Activity
(no information)
Research Themes
Not aligned to a University theme
Rights
License
(no information)
License - Other
CC 0: Public Domain Dedication 1.0 Universal
Access Rights/Conditions
Open access. If the data is not freely accessible via the link provided, please contact the nominated data manager or researchdata@jcu.edu.au for assistance.
Type
open
Rights
(no information)
Data
Data Location
Online Locations
  1. http://dx.doi.org/10.5061/dryad.rk0pq
Stored At
(no information)
Citation
Cite:
Qian, Z.; Schlüns, H.; Schlick-Steiner, B.; Steiner, F.; Robson, S.; Schlüns, E.; Crozier, R. (2011). Myrmecia sample locations and microsatellite data. James Cook University. [Data Files] 06d19a5d9d0f3151962078c97fb1622f