Research Data

Dataset examining host feeding parameters of Anopheles farauti in Haleta village, Solomon Islands

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General
Title
Dataset examining host feeding parameters of Anopheles farauti in Haleta village, Solomon Islands
Type
Dataset
Date Record Created
2016-02-08
Date Record Modified
2017-11-29
Language
English
Coverage
Date Coverage
2011-11-23 to 2014-02-21
Time Period
(no information)
Geospatial Location
  • Nggela Sule Island, Solomon Islands
  • Haleta, Solomon Islands
Description
Descriptions
  1. Type: full

    Background: The proportion of blood meals that mosquitoes take from a host species is a function of the interplay of extrinsic (abundance and location of potential hosts) and intrinsic (innate preference) factors. A mark-release-recapture experiment addressed whether host preference in a population of Anopheles farauti was uniform or if there were anthropophilic and zoophilic subpopulations. The corresponding fitness associated with selecting different hosts for blood meals was compared by measuring fecundity.

    Methods: The attractiveness of humans for blood meals by An. farauti in the Solomon Islands was compared to pigs using tent traps. Host fidelity was assessed by mark-release-recapture experiments in which different colour dusts were linked to the host to which the mosquito was first attracted. Outdoor resting An. farauti were captured on barrier screens and the human blood index (HBI) as well as the feeding index were calculated. The fecundity of individual An. farauti after feeding on either humans or pigs was assessed from blood-fed mosquitoes held in individual oviposition chambers.

    Results: Anopheles farauti were more attracted to humans than pigs at a ratio of 1.31:1.00. The mark-release-recapture experiment found evidence for An. farauti being a single population regarding host preference. The HBI of outdoor resting An. farauti was 0.93 and the feeding index was 1.29. Anopheles farauti that fed on a human host laid more eggs but had a longer oviposition time compared to An. farauti that had blood fed on a pig.

    Conclusions: One of the strongest drivers for host species preference was the relative abundance of the different host species. Here, An. farauti have a slight preference for humans over pigs as blood meal sources. However, the limited availability of alternative hosts relative to humans in the Solomon Islands ensures a very high proportion of blood meals are obtained from humans, and thus, the transmission potential of malaria by An. farauti is high.

  2. Type: note

    This dataset consists of a description of data archiving and data dictionaries in PDF format and a spreadsheet in MS Excel (.xlsx) and Open Document (.ods) formats

Related Publications
  1. Russell, Tanya L., Beebe, Nigel W., Bugoro, Hugo, Apairamo, Allan, Cooper, Robert D., Collins, Frank H., Lobo, Neil F., and Burkot, Thomas R. (2016) Determinants of host feeding success by Anopheles farauti. Malaria Journal, 15 (152). pp. 1-9.
    Open Access
Related Websites
(no information)
Related Data
(no information)
Related Services
(no information)
Technical metadata
(no information)
People
Creators
  1. Aggregated by: Dr Tanya Russell , tanya.russell@jcu.edu.au , Queensland Tropical Health Alliance (6204)
  2. Aggregated by: Prof Thomas Burkot , tom.burkot@jcu.edu.au , Queensland Tropical Health Alliance (6204), Centre for Biosecurity in Tropical Infectious Diseases
Primary Contact
Dr Tanya Russell, tanya.russell@jcu.edu.au
Supervisors
(no information)
Collaborators
  1. Dr Nigel W Beebe, University of Queensland, School of Biological Sciences, St. Lucia, QLD 4068, Australia
  2. Dr Hugo Bugoro, National Vector Borne Disease Control Programme, Ministry of Health, Honiara, Solomon Islands
  3. Mr Allan Apairamo, National Vector Borne Disease Control Programme, Ministry of Health, Honiara, Solomon Islands
  4. Lt Col Robert D Cooper, Australian Army Malaria Institute, Gallipoli Barracks, Enoggera, 4052, Australia
  5. Prof Frank H. Collins, Eck Institute for Global Health, Department of Biological Sciences, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN, 46556, USA
  6. Dr Neil F Lobo, Eck Institute for Global Health, Department of Biological Sciences, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN, 46556, USA
Subject
Fields of Research
  1. 060207 - Population Ecology (060207)
  2. 111799 - Public Health and Health Services not elsewhere classified (111799)
Socio-Economic Objective
  1. 960405 - Control of Pests, Diseases and Exotic Species at Regional or Larger Scales (960405)
  2. 920499 - Public Health (excl. Specific Population Health) not elsewhere classified (920499)
Keywords
  1. host fidelity
  2. mark-release-recapture
  3. human blood index (HBI)
  4. barrier screens
  5. outdoor resting
  6. fecundity
  7. Anopheles farauti
  8. Solomon Islands
Research Activity
(no information)
Research Themes
Tropical Health, Medicine and Biosecurity
Rights
License
CC BY: Attribution 3.0 AU
License - Other
(no information)
Access Rights/Conditions
Open access. If the data is not freely accessible via the link provided, please contact the nominated data manager or researchdata@jcu.edu.au for assistance.
Type
open
Rights
(no information)
Data
Data Location
Online Locations
Attachments
  1. Description_of_data_archiving_for_analysis_host_feeding.pdf (Supporting Material, Public)
  2. Dataset_Host_Choice_and_HBI.xlsx (Data File, Public)
  3. Dataset_Host_Choice_and_HBI.ods (Data File, Public)
Stored At
(no information)
Citation
Cite:
Russell, T.; Beebe, N.; Bugoro, H.; Apairamo, A.; Cooper, R.; Collins, F.; Lobo, N.; Burkot, T. (2016). Dataset examining host feeding parameters of Anopheles farauti in Haleta village, Solomon Islands. James Cook University. (dataset). http://dx.doi.org/10.4225/28/56BD6DF7C9CB8
Digital Object Identifier (DOI):
10.4225/28/56BD6DF7C9CB8