Research Data

Forest contraction in north equatorial Southeast Asia (Malaysia, Sarawak, Palawan, Borneo and the Philippines) during the Last Glacial Period from stable carbon isotope data

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General
Title
Forest contraction in north equatorial Southeast Asia (Malaysia, Sarawak, Palawan, Borneo and the Philippines) during the Last Glacial Period from stable carbon isotope data
Type
Dataset
Date Record Created
2012-05-29
Date Record Modified
2012-12-13
Language
English
Coverage
Date Coverage
2009-01-01 to 2010-12-01
Time Period
(no information)
Geospatial Location
  • Peninsular Malaysia, Palawan, Sarawak, Northern Borneo, Philippines, Southeast Asia.
Description
Descriptions
  1. Brief: Using stable carbon isotope compositions of ancient cave guano profiles, we show that there was a substantial forest contraction during the Last Glacial Period on both peninsular Malaysia and Palawan, while rainforest was maintained in northern Borneo.
  2. Full: Insular Southeast Asia is rich in Karst terranes that house large populations of insectivorous bats and swiftlets. Although some cave sites are roosts to relatively large populations of fruit bats, we limited our selection to those with insectivorous colonies. Extraction of insect cuticles from the guano sediment, pH, and C:N ratios confirmed that insectivorous populations remained dominant throughout each record. We located four sites with LGM sediment deposition within ~10° north of the equator. Along a transect from west to east are deposits in Batu cave (3°13'N, 101°42'E) near Kuala Lumpur in peninsular Malaysia; Niah cave (3°49'N, 113°46'E) in Sarawak, northern Borneo, and two sites in Palawan, Philippines, Gangub cave (8°31'N, 117°33'E) in the south and Makangit cave (10°28'N, 119°27'E) in the north. Age control is provided by radiocarbon dates on insect cuticles (1)taken from discrete intervals through each guano sequence, one charcoal sample from the Batu deposit, and three solvent-extracted bulk guano samples. Radiocarbon dates were calibrated to calendar years using the IntCal09 calibration curve (2) implemented using OXCAL 4.1 (3) (Tables 1, 2). References: (1) Wurster CM, Bird MI, Bull ID, Bryant C, Ascough P (2009) A protocol for radiocarbon dating tropical subfossil cave guano. Radiocarbon 51:977–986. (2) Reimer PJ, et al. (2009) IntCal09 and Marine09 radiocarbon age calibration curves 0–50,000 years cal BP. Radiocarbon 51:1111–1150. (3) Ramsey CB (2009) Bayesian analysis of radiocarbon dates. Radiocarbon 51:337–360.
  3. Note: Dataset consists of 2 tables in open document format and csv.
  4. Note: Coinvestigators: Charlotte Bryant. Natural Environment Research Council, Radiocarbon Laboratory, East Kilbride G75 OQF, United Kingdom. Jennifer A. J. Dungait. Organic Geochemistry Unit, Bristol Biogeochemistry Research Centre, School of Chemistry, University of Bristol, Cantock’s Close, Bristol BS8 1TS, United Kingdom. Victor Paz. Archaeological Studies Program, University of the Philippines, Diliman, Quezon City 1101, Philippines. Related JCU Research Themes: Tropical Ecosystems, Conservation and Climate Change Peoples and Societies in the Tropics
Related Publications
  1. Wurster, Christopher M., Bird, Michael I., Bull, Ian D., Creed, Frances, Bryant, Charlotte, Dungait, Jennifer A.J., and Paz, Victor (2010) Forest contraction in north equatorial Southeast Asia during the Last Glacial Period. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 107 (35). pp. 15508-15511. ISSN 1091-6490
Related Websites
  1. Wurster, Christopher (2011) Deep in the dung. Australasian Science, March . pp. 17-20. ISSN 1442-679X
Related Data
(no information)
Related Services
(no information)
Technical metadata
(no information)
People
Creators
  1. Aggregated by: Prof Michael Bird , School of Earth & Environmental Sciences
  2. Managed by: Dr Chris Wurster , School of Earth & Environmental Sciences
Primary Contact
Dr Chris Wurster, christopher.wurster@jcu.edu.au
Supervisors
(no information)
Collaborators
  1. Ian D. Bull. Organic Geochemistry Unit, Bristol Biogeochemistry Research Centre, School of Chemistry, University of Bristol, Cantock’s Close, Bristol BS8 1TS, United Kingdom.
  2. Frances Creed. Organic Geochemistry Unit, Bristol Biogeochemistry Research Centre, School of Chemistry, University of Bristol, Cantock’s Close, Bristol BS8 1TS, United Kingdom.
  3. Charlotte Bryant. Natural Environment Research Council, Radiocarbon Laboratory, East Kilbride G75 OQF, United Kingdom.
  4. Jennifer A. J. Dungait. Organic Geochemistry Unit, Bristol Biogeochemistry Research Centre, School of Chemistry, University of Bristol, Cantock’s Close, Bristol BS8 1TS, United Kingdom.
  5. Victor Paz. Archaeological Studies Program, University of the Philippines, Diliman, Quezon City 1101, Philippines.
Subject
Fields of Research
  1. 040606 - Quaternary Environments (040606) (040606)
  2. 210103 - Archaeology of Asia, Africa and the Americas (210103) (210103)
Socio-Economic Objective
  1. 970106 - Expanding Knowledge in the Biological Sciences (970106) (970106)
Keywords
  1. Biogeography
  2. Paleoecology
  3. Stable isotopes
  4. sundaland
  5. refugia
Research Activity
(no information)
Research Themes
Tropical Ecosystems, Conservation and Climate Change
People and Societies in the Tropics
Rights
Access Rights/Conditions
Open Access . If the data is not available via the provided link, please contact an associated party (preferrably the Manager as specified) for access.
Rights
(no information)
License
(no information)
License - Other
(no information)
Data
Data Location
Online Locations
Attachments
  1. Forest contraction in north equatorial Southeast Asia Tables 1 to 3.zip (Data File, Public)
Stored At
School of Earth and Environmental Science, James Cook University, PO Box 6811, Cairns, Qld 4870, AUSTRALIA, Phone Main Office: +61 7 4042 1211, Fax General: +61 7 4042 1284
Citation
Cite:
Wurster, Chris.; Bird, Michael.; Bull, Ian.; Creed, Frances.; Bryant, Charlotte.; Dungait, Jennifer.; Paz, Victor. (2012). Forest contraction in north equatorial Southeast Asia (Malaysia, Sarawak, Palawan, Borneo and the Philippines) during the Last Glacial Period from stable carbon isotope data. James Cook University. [Data files] jcu.edu.au/tdh/collection/a6669738-a2d4-4f7f-9dc4-b0829015c126