Research Data

Disrupted learning: habitat degradation impairs crucial antipredator responses in naïve prey

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General
Title
Disrupted learning: habitat degradation impairs crucial antipredator responses in naïve prey
Type
Dataset
Date Record Created
2015-07-13
Date Record Modified
2018-01-18
Language
English
Coverage
Date Coverage
2014-11-16 to 2014-12-10
Time Period
(no information)
Geospatial Location
  • 14deg41'S, 145deg27'E
Description
Descriptions
  1. Type: brief

    This dataset contains data from two field experiments that examine the influence of the degradation of coral reefs on the ability of juvenile reef fishes to learn about the identity of predators

  2. Type: full

    Habitat degradation is a global problem and one of the main causes of biodiversity loss. Though widespread, the mechanisms that underlie faunal changes are poorly understood. In tropical marine systems corals play a crucial role in forming habitat, but coral cover on many reefs is declining sharply. Coral degradation affects the olfactory cues that provide reliable information on the presence and intensity of threat. Here we show for the first time that the ability of a habitat generalist to learn predators using an efficient and widespread method of predator learning is compromised in degraded coral habitats. Results indicate that chemical alarm cues are no longer indicative of a local threat for the habitat generalist (the damselfish, Pomacentrus amboinensis), and these cues can no longer be used to learn the identity of novel predators in degraded habitats. In contrast, a rubble specialist and congeneric (P. coelestis) responded to olfactory threat cues regardless of background environment. Understanding how some species can cope with or acclimate to the detrimental impacts of habitat degradation on risk assessment abilities will be crucial to defining the scope of resilience in threatened communities.

Related Publications
  1. McCormick, Mark I., and Lönnstedt, Oona M. (2016) Disrupted learning: habitat degradation impairs crucial antipredator responses in naive prey. Proceedings of the Royal Society of London Series B, Biological Sciences, 283. pp. 1-8.
Related Websites
(no information)
Related Data
(no information)
Related Services
(no information)
Technical metadata
(no information)
People
Creators
  1. Managed by: Prof Mark McCormick , mark.mccormick@jcu.edu.au , Discipline of Marine Biology (6621)
  2. Associated with: Ms Oona Lonnstedt , Discipline of Marine Biology (6621)
Primary Contact
Prof Mark McCormick, mark.mccormick@jcu.edu.au
Supervisors
(no information)
Collaborators
(no information)
Subject
Fields of Research
  1. 060201 - Behavioural Ecology (060201)
  2. 060205 - Marine and Estuarine Ecology (incl. Marine Ichthyology) (060205)
Socio-Economic Objective
  1. 960808 - Marine Flora, Fauna and Biodiversity (960808)
  2. 960307 - Effects of Climate Change and Variability on Australia (excl. Social Impacts) (960307)
Keywords
  1. coral reef fishes
  2. habitat degradation
  3. damselfish
  4. predator-prey dynamics
  5. learning
  6. alarm cue
  7. ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies
Research Activity
(no information)
Research Themes
Tropical Ecosystems, Conservation and Climate Change
Tropical Health, Medicine and Biosecurity
Rights
License
CC BY-NC-SA: Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 AU
License - Other
(no information)
Access Rights/Conditions
Open access. If the data is not freely accessible via the link provided, please contact the nominated data manager or researchdata@jcu.edu.au for assistance.
Type
open
Rights
(no information)
Data
Data Location
Online Locations
Attachments
  1. Habitat_degradation_hinders_predator_learning_Data_Repository_v2.xlsx (Data File, Public)
  2. Habitat_degradation_hinders_predator_learning_Data_Repository_v2.ods (Data File, Public)
Stored At
Room222, building 28 James Cook University, Townsville, Queensland, Australia
Citation
Cite:
McCormick, Mark. (2015). Disrupted learning: habitat degradation impairs crucial antipredator responses in naïve prey. James Cook University. [Data files] http://dx.doi.org/10.4225/28/55A45055A0C12
Digital Object Identifier (DOI):
10.4225/28/55A45055A0C12