Research Data

Data from: Widespread hybridisation and bi-directional introgression in sympatric species of coral reef fish

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General
Title
Data from: Widespread hybridisation and bi-directional introgression in sympatric species of coral reef fish
Type
Dataset
Date Record Created
2017-11-08
Date Record Modified
2018-01-03
Language
English
Coverage
Date Coverage
(no information)
Time Period
(no information)
Geospatial Location
  • Keppel Islands, Great Barrier Reef, Queensland, Australia (23°10′S, 150°57′E)
  • Percy Islands, Great Barrier Reef, Queensland, Australia (21°42′S, 150°18′E)
  • Capricorn Bunker reefs, Great Barrier Reef, Queensland, Australia(23°25′S, 151°46′E)
Description
Descriptions
  1. Type: brief

    Data consists of 2 files:

    (1) 25 microsatellite loci for 2991 Plectropomus spp. collected from the southern Great Barrier Reef, Australia

    (2) 2271 SNP loci from 80 Plectropomus spp. including identified hybrids collected from the southern Great Barrier Reef, Australia

    Abstract [Related Publication]: Coral reefs are highly diverse ecosystems, where numerous closely related species often coexist. How new species arise and are maintained in these high geneflow environments have been long-standing conundrums. Hybridization and patterns of introgression between sympatric species provide a unique insight into the mechanisms of speciation and the maintenance of species boundaries. In this study, we investigate the extent of hybridization between two closely related species of coral reef fish: the common coral trout (Plectropomus leopardus) and the bar-cheek coral trout (Plectropomus maculatus). Using a complementary set of 25 microsatellite loci, we distinguish pure genotype classes from first- and later-generation hybrids, identifying 124 interspecific hybrids from a collection of 2,991 coral trout sampled in inshore and mid-shelf reefs of the southern Great Barrier Reef. Hybrids were ubiquitous among reefs, fertile and spanned multiple generations suggesting both ecological and evolutionary processes are acting to maintain species barriers. We elaborate on these finding to investigate the extent of genomic introgression and admixture from 2,271 SNP loci recovered from a ddRAD library of pure and hybrid individuals. An analysis of genomic clines on recovered loci indicates that 261 SNP loci deviate from a model of neutral introgression, of which 132 indicate a pattern of introgression consistent with selection favouring both hybrid and parental genotypes. Our findings indicate genome-wide, bidirectional introgression between two sympatric species of coral reef fishes and provide further support to a growing body of evidence for the role of hybridization in the evolution of coral reef fishes.

    The full methodology is available in the publication shown in the Related Publications link below.

     

  2. Type: note

    This dataset is available from Dryad in plain text (.txt) format. Dryad data package: Harrison H, Berumen M, Saenz-Agudelo P, Salas E, Williamson D, Jones G (2017) Data from: Widespread hybridisation and bi-directional introgression in sympatric species of coral reef fish. Dryad Digital Repository. https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.v861k

Related Publications
  1. Harrison, Hugo B., Berumen, Michael L., Saenz-Agudelo, Pablo, Salas, Eva, Williamson, David H. and Jones, Geoffrey P. (2017) Widespread hybridization and bidirectional introgression in sympatric species of coral reef fish. Molecular Ecology, 26(2). pp. 5692-5704.
Related Websites
(no information)
Related Data
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Related Services
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Technical metadata
(no information)
People
Creators
  1. Managed by: Dr Hugo Harrison , hugo.harrison@jcu.edu.au , ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies
  2. Associated with: Dr David Williamson , david.williamson@jcu.edu.au , ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies, Marine Biology & Aquaculture
  3. Associated with: Prof Geoffrey Jones , geoffrey.jones@jcu.edu.au , ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies, Zoology and Ecology
Primary Contact
Dr Hugo Harrison, hugo.harrison@jcu.edu.au
Supervisors
(no information)
Collaborators
  1. Michael L. Berumen, Red Sea Research Center, King Abdullah University of Science and Technology, Thuwal, Saudi Arabia
  2. Pablo Saenz-Agudelo, Instituto de Ciencias Ambientales y Evolutivas, Universidad Austral de Chile, Valdivia, Chile
  3. Eva Salas, Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of California Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA, USA
Subject
Fields of Research
  1. 060411 - Population, Ecological and Evolutionary Genetics (060411)
Socio-Economic Objective
(no information)
Keywords
  1. ecological genetics
  2. fish
  3. hybridization
  4. natural selection and contemporary evolution
  5. population ecology
  6. Plectropomus leopardus
  7. Plectropomus maculatus
  8. ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies
Research Activity
(no information)
Research Themes
Tropical Ecosystems, Conservation and Climate Change
Rights
License
(no information)
License - Other
CC 0: Public Domain Dedication 1.0 Universal
Access Rights/Conditions
Open access. If the data is not freely accessible via the link provided, please contact the nominated data manager or researchdata@jcu.edu.au for assistance.
Type
open
Rights
(no information)
Data
Data Location
Online Locations
  1. https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.v861k
Stored At
(no information)
Citation
Cite:
Harrison, H.; Berumen, M.; Saenz-Agudelo, P.; Williamson, D.; Jones, G. (2017). Data from: Widespread hybridisation and bi-directional introgression in sympatric species of coral reef fish. James Cook University. (dataset). 4e1e5388c08a5cb8c5845b9792636b9b