Research Data

Data from: Ocean acidification alters predator behaviour and reduces predation rate

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General
Title
Data from: Ocean acidification alters predator behaviour and reduces predation rate
Type
Dataset
Date Record Created
2017-11-08
Date Record Modified
2018-01-02
Language
English
Coverage
Date Coverage
(no information)
Time Period
(no information)
Geospatial Location
  • Lizard Island, Great Barrier Reef, Queensland, Australia
Description
Descriptions
  1. Type: brief

    Data sheets include: distance moved, direction, side, time spent buried, time to bury, self-righting, distance predator-prey, prey survival, mass, water chemistry, total alkalinity for groups A and B in elevated and control CO2 treatments and morphometrics.

    Abstract [Related Publication]: Ocean acidification poses a range of threats to marine invertebrates; however, the emerging and likely widespread effects of rising carbon dioxide (CO2) levels on marine invertebrate behaviour are still little understood. Here, we show that ocean acidification alters and impairs key ecological behaviours of the predatory cone snail Conus marmoreus. Projected near-future seawater CO2 levels (975 µatm) increased activity in this coral reef molluscivore more than threefold (from less than 4 to more than 12 mm min−1) and decreased the time spent buried to less than one-third when compared with the present-day control conditions (390 µatm). Despite increasing activity, elevated CO2 reduced predation rate during predator–prey interactions with control-treated humpbacked conch, Gibberulus gibberulus gibbosus; 60% of control predators successfully captured and consumed their prey, compared with only 10% of elevated CO2 predators. The alteration of key ecological behaviours of predatory invertebrates by near-future ocean acidification could have potentially far-reaching implications for predator–prey interactions and trophic dynamics in marine ecosystems. Combined evidence that the behaviours of both species in this predator–prey relationship are altered by elevated CO2 suggests food web interactions and ecosystem structure will become increasingly difficult to predict as ocean acidification advances over coming decades.

    The full methodology is available in the publication shown in the Related Publications link below.

     

  2. Type: note

    This dataset is available from Dryad in MS Excel (.xlsx) format. Dryad data package: Watson S, Fields JB, Munday PL (2017) Data from: Ocean acidification alters predator behaviour and reduces predation rate. Dryad Digital Repository. https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.jc77j

Related Publications
  1. Watson, Sue-Ann, Fields, Jennifer B., and Munday, Philip L. (2017) Ocean acidification alters predator behaviour and reduces predation rate. Biology Letters, 13. pp. 1-5.
  2. Watson, Sue-Ann, Fields, Jennifer B., and Munday, Philip L. (2017) Ocean acidification alters predator behaviour and reduces predation rate. Biology Letters, 13. pp. 1-5.
    Green Open Access (Accepted) Version
Related Websites
(no information)
Related Data
(no information)
Related Services
(no information)
Technical metadata
(no information)
People
Creators
  1. Managed by: Dr Sue-Ann Watson , sueann.watson@jcu.edu.au , ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies, Geoscience
  2. Associated with: Prof Philip Munday , philip.munday@jcu.edu.au , ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies, Zoology and Ecology
Primary Contact
Dr Sue-Ann Watson, sueann.watson@jcu.edu.au
Supervisors
(no information)
Collaborators
  1. Jennifer B. Fields, Pitzer College, Claremont, CA, USA
Subject
Fields of Research
  1. 060201 - Behavioural Ecology (060201)
  2. 060205 - Marine and Estuarine Ecology (incl. Marine Ichthyology) (060205)
  3. 050101 - Ecological Impacts of Climate Change (050101)
Socio-Economic Objective
  1. 960399 - Climate and Climate Change not elsewhere classified (960399)
  2. 970106 - Expanding Knowledge in the Biological Sciences (970106)
  3. 970105 - Expanding Knowledge in the Environmental Sciences (970105)
Keywords
  1. trophic interaction
  2. gastropod
  3. Conus marmoreus
  4. Gibberulus gibberulus gibbosus
  5. ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies
  6. predator-prey
  7. carbon dioxide
  8. invertebrate
  9. molluscs
  10. coral reef
  11. cone snail
  12. jumping snail
  13. ocean acidification
Research Activity
(no information)
Research Themes
Tropical Ecosystems, Conservation and Climate Change
Rights
License
(no information)
License - Other
CC 0: Public Domain Dedication 1.0 Universal
Access Rights/Conditions
Open access. If the data is not freely accessible via the link provided, please contact the nominated data manager or researchdata@jcu.edu.au for assistance.
Type
open
Rights
(no information)
Data
Data Location
Online Locations
  1. https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.jc77j
Stored At
(no information)
Citation
Cite:
Watson, S.; Fields, J.; Munday, P. (2016). Data from: Ocean acidification alters predator behaviour and reduces predation rate. James Cook University. (dataset). 7227c5f6aa0eadd644da7fa4a1ed981c