Research Data

Phenotypic determinants of survival: a field study

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General
Title
Phenotypic determinants of survival: a field study
Type
Dataset
Date Record Created
2017-09-21
Date Record Modified
2018-01-04
Language
English
Coverage
Date Coverage
2016-10-15 to 2016-11-30
Time Period
(no information)
Geospatial Location
  • Lizard Island, Queensland, Australia
Description
Descriptions
  1. Type: full

    1.      Mortality through predation is often selective, particular at life-history bottlenecks. While many studies have looked at the importance for survival of specific prey characteristics in isolation, few have looked at a broad array of attributes and how they relate to survival in a realistic context.

    2.      Our study measures 18 morphological, performance and behavioural traits of a juvenile damselfish that have been hypothesized as important for prey survival, and examines how they relate to survival in the field immediately after settlement. These attributes included size, relative false eye-spot size, fast-start escape response kinematics, thigmotaxis, laterality, and space use and activity in the field.

    3.      Using conditional inference trees we identify the most important drivers out of a reduced suite of 13 characters on 111 complete replicate fish (Pomacentrus chrysurus). Fast-start response latency, boldness, feeding rates and two measures of activity were found to significantly contribute to survival. Morphological variables and most laboratory measures of performance appeared to contribute little to survival.

    4.      Results suggest selection works on a suite of characters associated with boldness. Bold and active fish are those that will be best able to learn using public information, but because of the relatively naïveté of newly metamorphosed fishes, speed to react to a strike from an unknown predator is of critical importance.

    5.      Findings substantiate the ecomorphological paradigm by suggesting that selection on behaviour modifies the correlations of morphological and performance variables with survival probabilities, since behaviour modifies performance capabilities by making them specific to context.

  2. Type: note

    This dataset is available as a spreadsheet in MS Excel (.xlsx) and Open Document formats (.ods)

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Related Websites
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Related Data
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Technical metadata
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People
Creators
  1. Managed by: Prof Mark McCormick , mark.mccormick@jcu.edu.au , ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies, Marine Biology & Aquaculture
  2. Aggregated by: Miss Bridie Allan , bridie.allan1@jcu.edu.au , ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies, Marine Biology & Aquaculture
Primary Contact
Prof Mark McCormick, mark.mccormick@jcu.edu.au
Supervisors
(no information)
Collaborators
(no information)
Subject
Fields of Research
  1. 060201 - Behavioural Ecology (060201)
  2. 060205 - Marine and Estuarine Ecology (incl. Marine Ichthyology) (060205)
Socio-Economic Objective
  1. 960808 - Marine Flora, Fauna and Biodiversity (960808)
Keywords
  1. predator-prey
  2. morphology
  3. performance
  4. behaviour
  5. survival
  6. ecomorphological paradigm
  7. coral reef fish
  8. ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies
Research Activity
(no information)
Research Themes
Tropical Ecosystems, Conservation and Climate Change
Rights
License
CC BY-NC 4.0: Attribution-Noncommercial 4.0 International
License - Other
(no information)
Access Rights/Conditions
Open access. If the data is not feely accessible via the link provided, please contact the nominated data manager or researchdata@jcu.edu.au for assistance.
Type
open
Rights
(no information)
Data
Data Location
Online Locations
Attachments
  1. Phenotypic_determinants_data.ods (Data File, Public)
  2. Phenotypic_determinants_data.xlsx (Data File, Public)
Stored At
(no information)
Citation
Cite:
McCormick, M.; Allan, B. (2017). Phenotypic determinants of survival: a field study. James Cook University. [Data Files] http://dx.doi.org/10.4225/28/59c47d4b3a5f2
Digital Object Identifier (DOI):
10.4225/28/59c47d4b3a5f2