Published Objects Coral metagenome: bacterial associates of corals fascinator a3e8a0c5bbe4ef606012ecd6cb54e92f 2019-03-15T12:57:14Z ["<p>Bacterial 16s rDNA sequencing of different tissues from the coral Acropora granulosa, from the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) BioProject number PRJNA233450. Submitted by James Cook University.</p><p>Data type: Random survey.</p><p>Abstract [Related Publication]: Despite being one of the simplest metazoans, corals harbor some of the most highly diverse and abundant microbial communities. Differentiating core, symbiotic bacteria from this diverse host-associated consortium is essential for characterizing the functional contributions of bacteria but has not been possible yet. Here we characterize the coral core microbiome and demonstrate clear phylogenetic and functional divisions between the micro-scale, niche habitats within the coral host. In doing so, we discover seven distinct bacterial phylotypes that are universal to the core microbiome of coral species, separated by thousands of kilometres of oceans. The two most abundant phylotypes are co-localized specifically with the corals' endosymbiotic algae and symbiont-containing host cells. These bacterial symbioses likely facilitate the success of the dinoflagellate endosymbiosis with corals in diverse environmental regimes.</p><p>The full methodology is available in the Open Access publication from the Related Publications link below.</p><p> </p>", "full", "<p>Bacterial 16s rDNA sequencing of different tissues from the coral Acropora granulosa, from the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) BioProject number PRJNA233450. Submitted by James Cook University.</p><p>Data type: Random survey.</p><p>Abstract [Related Publication]: Despite being one of the simplest metazoans, corals harbor some of the most highly diverse and abundant microbial communities. Differentiating core, symbiotic bacteria from this diverse host-associated consortium is essential for characterizing the functional contributions of bacteria but has not been possible yet. Here we characterize the coral core microbiome and demonstrate clear phylogenetic and functional divisions between the micro-scale, niche habitats within the coral host. In doing so, we discover seven distinct bacterial phylotypes that are universal to the core microbiome of coral species, separated by thousands of kilometres of oceans. The two most abundant phylotypes are co-localized specifically with the corals' endosymbiotic algae and symbiont-containing host cells. These bacterial symbioses likely facilitate the success of the dinoflagellate endosymbiosis with corals in diverse environmental regimes.</p><p>The full methodology is available in the Open Access publication from the Related Publications link below.</p><p> </p>", ""] ["<p>Bacterial 16s rDNA sequencing of different tissues from the coral Acropora granulosa, from the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) BioProject number PRJNA233450. Submitted by James Cook University.</p><p>Data type: Random survey.</p><p>Abstract [Related Publication]: Despite being one of the simplest metazoans, corals harbor some of the most highly diverse and abundant microbial communities. Differentiating core, symbiotic bacteria from this diverse host-associated consortium is essential for characterizing the functional contributions of bacteria but has not been possible yet. Here we characterize the coral core microbiome and demonstrate clear phylogenetic and functional divisions between the micro-scale, niche habitats within the coral host. In doing so, we discover seven distinct bacterial phylotypes that are universal to the core microbiome of coral species, separated by thousands of kilometres of oceans. The two most abundant phylotypes are co-localized specifically with the corals' endosymbiotic algae and symbiont-containing host cells. These bacterial symbioses likely facilitate the success of the dinoflagellate endosymbiosis with corals in diverse environmental regimes.</p><p>The full methodology is available in the Open Access publication from the Related Publications link below.</p><p> </p>", "full", "<p>Bacterial 16s rDNA sequencing of different tissues from the coral Acropora granulosa, from the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) BioProject number PRJNA233450. Submitted by James Cook University.</p><p>Data type: Random survey.</p><p>Abstract [Related Publication]: Despite being one of the simplest metazoans, corals harbor some of the most highly diverse and abundant microbial communities. Differentiating core, symbiotic bacteria from this diverse host-associated consortium is essential for characterizing the functional contributions of bacteria but has not been possible yet. Here we characterize the coral core microbiome and demonstrate clear phylogenetic and functional divisions between the micro-scale, niche habitats within the coral host. In doing so, we discover seven distinct bacterial phylotypes that are universal to the core microbiome of coral species, separated by thousands of kilometres of oceans. The two most abundant phylotypes are co-localized specifically with the corals' endosymbiotic algae and symbiont-containing host cells. These bacterial symbioses likely facilitate the success of the dinoflagellate endosymbiosis with corals in diverse environmental regimes.</p><p>The full methodology is available in the Open Access publication from the Related Publications link below.</p><p> </p>", ""] Ecological memory modifies the cumulative impact of recurrent climate extremes fascinator 511d881a826bc080783dc659868dab0b 2019-03-15T12:53:35Z ["<p>This dataset supports the 2018 <em>Nature Climate Change</em> publication by Terry Hughes, James Kerry, Sean Connolly (lead authors) and 10 co-authors, entitled 'Ecological memory modifies the cumulative impact of recurrent climate extremes'. It is comprised of one data file as an Excel .csv in long form:</p><p>(1) 2016-2017 data - gives (in long format) the aerial scores and Degree Heating Weeks for reefs surveyed in 2016 (1135 reefs) and in 2017 (742 reefs)</p>", "brief", "<p>This dataset supports the 2018 <em>Nature Climate Change</em> publication by Terry Hughes, James Kerry, Sean Connolly (lead authors) and 10 co-authors, entitled 'Ecological memory modifies the cumulative impact of recurrent climate extremes'. It is comprised of one data file as an Excel .csv in long form:</p><p>(1) 2016-2017 data - gives (in long format) the aerial scores and Degree Heating Weeks for reefs surveyed in 2016 (1135 reefs) and in 2017 (742 reefs)</p>", "<p>This dataset supports the 2018 <em>Nature Climate Change</em> publication by Terry Hughes, James Kerry, Sean Connolly (lead authors) and 10 co-authors, entitled 'Ecological memory modifies the cumulative impact of recurrent climate extremes'. It is comprised of one data file as an Excel .csv in long form:</p><p>(1) 2016-2017 data - Aerial surveys were conducted in March and April 2016, and in March 2017, to measure the geographic extent and severity of bleaching on the Great Barrier Reef. 1,135 individual reef scores are given for 2016 and 742 for 2017. They fall in to one of five bleaching categories: (0) less than 1% of corals bleached, (1) 1-10%, (2) 10-30%, (3) 30-60%, and (4) more than 60% of corals bleached. The accuracy of the aerial scores was ground-truthed in 2016 by measuring the extent of bleaching underwater on 104 reefs, also during March/April 2016.</p><p>The dataset also contains the Degree Heating Weeks (heat stress metric) from the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) for year-to-date heat stress based on the date a reef was surveyed.</p><p>Finally, each reef was assigned to one of three categories: North, Central or South, denoting is broad latitudinal position on the Great Barrier Reef. This clustering was used in some analyses.</p>", "full", "<p>This dataset supports the 2018 <em>Nature Climate Change</em> publication by Terry Hughes, James Kerry, Sean Connolly (lead authors) and 10 co-authors, entitled 'Ecological memory modifies the cumulative impact of recurrent climate extremes'. It is comprised of one data file as an Excel .csv in long form:</p><p>(1) 2016-2017 data - Aerial surveys were conducted in March and April 2016, and in March 2017, to measure the geographic extent and severity of bleaching on the Great Barrier Reef. 1,135 individual reef scores are given for 2016 and 742 for 2017. They fall in to one of five bleaching categories: (0) less than 1% of corals bleached, (1) 1-10%, (2) 10-30%, (3) 30-60%, and (4) more than 60% of corals bleached. The accuracy of the aerial scores was ground-truthed in 2016 by measuring the extent of bleaching underwater on 104 reefs, also during March/April 2016.</p><p>The dataset also contains the Degree Heating Weeks (heat stress metric) from the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) for year-to-date heat stress based on the date a reef was surveyed.</p><p>Finally, each reef was assigned to one of three categories: North, Central or South, denoting is broad latitudinal position on the Great Barrier Reef. This clustering was used in some analyses.</p>", ""] ["<p>This dataset supports the 2018 <em>Nature Climate Change</em> publication by Terry Hughes, James Kerry, Sean Connolly (lead authors) and 10 co-authors, entitled 'Ecological memory modifies the cumulative impact of recurrent climate extremes'. It is comprised of one data file as an Excel .csv in long form:</p><p>(1) 2016-2017 data - gives (in long format) the aerial scores and Degree Heating Weeks for reefs surveyed in 2016 (1135 reefs) and in 2017 (742 reefs)</p>", "brief", "<p>This dataset supports the 2018 <em>Nature Climate Change</em> publication by Terry Hughes, James Kerry, Sean Connolly (lead authors) and 10 co-authors, entitled 'Ecological memory modifies the cumulative impact of recurrent climate extremes'. It is comprised of one data file as an Excel .csv in long form:</p><p>(1) 2016-2017 data - gives (in long format) the aerial scores and Degree Heating Weeks for reefs surveyed in 2016 (1135 reefs) and in 2017 (742 reefs)</p>", "<p>This dataset supports the 2018 <em>Nature Climate Change</em> publication by Terry Hughes, James Kerry, Sean Connolly (lead authors) and 10 co-authors, entitled 'Ecological memory modifies the cumulative impact of recurrent climate extremes'. It is comprised of one data file as an Excel .csv in long form:</p><p>(1) 2016-2017 data - Aerial surveys were conducted in March and April 2016, and in March 2017, to measure the geographic extent and severity of bleaching on the Great Barrier Reef. 1,135 individual reef scores are given for 2016 and 742 for 2017. They fall in to one of five bleaching categories: (0) less than 1% of corals bleached, (1) 1-10%, (2) 10-30%, (3) 30-60%, and (4) more than 60% of corals bleached. The accuracy of the aerial scores was ground-truthed in 2016 by measuring the extent of bleaching underwater on 104 reefs, also during March/April 2016.</p><p>The dataset also contains the Degree Heating Weeks (heat stress metric) from the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) for year-to-date heat stress based on the date a reef was surveyed.</p><p>Finally, each reef was assigned to one of three categories: North, Central or South, denoting is broad latitudinal position on the Great Barrier Reef. This clustering was used in some analyses.</p>", "full", "<p>This dataset supports the 2018 <em>Nature Climate Change</em> publication by Terry Hughes, James Kerry, Sean Connolly (lead authors) and 10 co-authors, entitled 'Ecological memory modifies the cumulative impact of recurrent climate extremes'. It is comprised of one data file as an Excel .csv in long form:</p><p>(1) 2016-2017 data - Aerial surveys were conducted in March and April 2016, and in March 2017, to measure the geographic extent and severity of bleaching on the Great Barrier Reef. 1,135 individual reef scores are given for 2016 and 742 for 2017. They fall in to one of five bleaching categories: (0) less than 1% of corals bleached, (1) 1-10%, (2) 10-30%, (3) 30-60%, and (4) more than 60% of corals bleached. The accuracy of the aerial scores was ground-truthed in 2016 by measuring the extent of bleaching underwater on 104 reefs, also during March/April 2016.</p><p>The dataset also contains the Degree Heating Weeks (heat stress metric) from the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) for year-to-date heat stress based on the date a reef was surveyed.</p><p>Finally, each reef was assigned to one of three categories: North, Central or South, denoting is broad latitudinal position on the Great Barrier Reef. This clustering was used in some analyses.</p>", ""] Global warming transforms coral reef assemblages fascinator 4f426f5bc8aa7b0a873882044449598d 2019-03-15T12:57:39Z ["<p><span style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Verdana, sans-serif;">This dataset supports the 2018 <em>Nature</em> publication by Terry Hughes and 15 co-authors, entitled 'Global warming transforms coral reef assemblages'. It is comprised of three separate excel files:</span></p><p><span style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Verdana, sans-serif;">(1) Aerial Survey Data - which gives aerial scores of bleaching severity for 1156 coral reefs on the Great Barrier Reef in March/April 2016.</span></p><p><span style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Verdana, sans-serif;">(2) In Water Survey Data - which gives data for instantaneous and longer-term mortality (March 2016 to November 2016) of corals, and associated heat stress for 63 reefs on the Great Barrier Reef.</span></p><p><span style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Verdana, sans-serif;">(3) Taxonomic Data - which gives benthic cover data for 15 individual taxa at two time points: (a) during the peak of the 2016 mass coral bleaching event (March 2016) and (b) eight months later (November 2016).</span></p>", "brief", "<p><span style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Verdana, sans-serif;">This dataset supports the 2018 <em>Nature</em> publication by Terry Hughes and 15 co-authors, entitled 'Global warming transforms coral reef assemblages'. It is comprised of three separate excel files:</span></p><p><span style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Verdana, sans-serif;">(1) Aerial Survey Data - which gives aerial scores of bleaching severity for 1156 coral reefs on the Great Barrier Reef in March/April 2016.</span></p><p><span style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Verdana, sans-serif;">(2) In Water Survey Data - which gives data for instantaneous and longer-term mortality (March 2016 to November 2016) of corals, and associated heat stress for 63 reefs on the Great Barrier Reef.</span></p><p><span style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Verdana, sans-serif;">(3) Taxonomic Data - which gives benthic cover data for 15 individual taxa at two time points: (a) during the peak of the 2016 mass coral bleaching event (March 2016) and (b) eight months later (November 2016).</span></p>", "<p><span style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Verdana, sans-serif;">This dataset supports the 2018 <em>Nature</em> publication by Terry Hughes and 15 co-authors, entitled 'Global warming transforms coral reef assemblages'. It is comprised of three separate excel files:</span></p><p><strong><span style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Verdana, sans-serif;">(1) Aerial Survey Data</span></strong></p><p><span style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Verdana, sans-serif;">Aerial surveys were conducted in March and April 2016 to measure the geographic extent and severity of bleaching on the Great Barrier Reef. Each of 1,156 individual reefs was scored into one of five bleaching categories: (0) less than 1% of corals bleached, (1) 1-10%, (2) 10-30%, (3) 30-60%, and (4) more than 60% of corals bleached. The accuracy of the aerial scores was ground-truthed by measuring the extent of bleaching underwater on 104 reefs, also during March/April 2016. The aerial surveys were conducted throughout the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park and Torres Strait between Australia and Papua New Guinea, from the coast of Queensland to the outermost reefs, and along the entire Reef from latitudes 9.5-23.5°S.</span></p><p><span style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Verdana, sans-serif;">The aerial bleaching scores were subsequently converted into mortality estimates using a calibration curve based on underwater measurements of coral losses. </span></p><p><span style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Verdana, sans-serif;">The dataset contains the following information:</span></p><p><span style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Verdana, sans-serif;">Reef identification (ReefID, ReefName, Longitude, Latitude)</span></p><p><span style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Verdana, sans-serif;">BleachingCategory (categories described above ranging from 0 – 5)</span></p><p><span style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Verdana, sans-serif;">ChangeCover (%) (the estimate of mortality for a giving bleaching category, described above)</span></p><p><strong><span style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Verdana, sans-serif;">(2) In Water Survey Data </span></strong></p><p><span style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Verdana, sans-serif;">At the same time as the aerial surveys, in-water surveys of 63 reefs were conducted to assess levels of coral cover and initial mortality of different taxa due to heat stress. On each reef, the extent of bleaching and mortality on individual coral colonies was measured at two sites using five 10 x 1 m belt transects placed on the reef crest at a depth of 2 m. Longer-term coral loss was measured at the same 63 reefs in October and November 2016, eight months after the initial in-water surveys. </span></p><p><span style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Verdana, sans-serif;">Heat stress on the Great Barrier Reef in 2016 was quantified at 5 km resolution, using the NOAA Coral Reef Watch version 3 Degree Heating Week (DHW) metric.</span></p><p><span style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Verdana, sans-serif;">The dataset contains the following information:</span></p><p><span style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Verdana, sans-serif;">ReefID</span></p><p><span style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Verdana, sans-serif;">Heat stress (in degree Centigrade weeks, see above description)</span></p><p><span style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Verdana, sans-serif;">InstantMortality (the percentage of colonies that died instantaneously during the mass bleaching event)</span></p><p><span style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Verdana, sans-serif;">PercentBleached (%) (the percentage of colonies that were bleached during the mass bleaching event)</span></p><p><span style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Verdana, sans-serif;">ChangeInCover (the difference between final coral cover and initial coral cover (including recently dead coral), both values were log10-transformed prior to calculating the change in cover)</span></p><p><span style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Verdana, sans-serif;">DeltaMDS (the before-after shift in taxonomic composition for a given reef space based on a non-metric multi-dimensional scaling analysis of coral assemblages, see below for description)</span></p><p><strong><span style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Verdana, sans-serif;">(3) Taxonomic Data</span></strong></p><p><span style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Verdana, sans-serif;">The in-water surveys described above, were conducted at a fine taxonomic resolution. To include all species, the majority of which are too rare to analyse individually, we pooled them into 15 ecologically cohesive groups depending on their morphology, life history, and taxonomy. Three of the 15 are ubiquitous species or species complexes: Pocillopora damicornis, Seriatopora hystrix, and Stylophora pistillata. In each of the multi-species groups, the dominant species or genera on reef crests were: Other Acropora (<em>A. gemmifera, A. humilis, A. loripes, A. nasuta, A. secale, A. tenuis, A. valida</em>); Favids (i.e. species and genera from the formerly recognized Family Faviidae - Cyphastrea, Favia, Favites, Goniastrea, Leptastrea, Montastrea, Platygyra); Mussidae (Lobophyllia, Symphyllia); Isopora (<em>I. palifera, I. cuneata</em>); Other Pocillopora (<em>P. meandrina, P. verrucosa</em>); Other sessile animals (sponges, tunicates, molluscs); Porites (<em>P. annae, P. lobata</em>);  Montipora (<em>M. foliosa, M. grisea, M. hispida, M. montasteriata, M. tuberculosa</em>); Staghorn Acropora (<em>A. florida, A. intermedia, A. microphthalma, A. muricata, A. robusta</em>); Soft Corals (alcyonaceans, zooanthids); and Tabular Acropora (<em>A. cytherea, A. hyacinthus, A. anthocercis</em>).</span></p><p><span style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Verdana, sans-serif;">The coral cover for each of the 15 taxonomic categories has been provided for the initial surveys in March and April 2016 and the later surveys in October and November 2016. These data were used to generate the nMDS analysis discussed above. The shift in composition is measured as the Euclidean distance between the initial and final nMDS values for each location.</span></p><p><span style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Verdana, sans-serif;">The dataset contains the following information:</span></p><p><span style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Verdana, sans-serif;">ReefID as rows</span></p><p><span style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Verdana, sans-serif;">Taxonomic Category (e.g. Isopora) as columns</span></p>", "full", "<p><span style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Verdana, sans-serif;">This dataset supports the 2018 <em>Nature</em> publication by Terry Hughes and 15 co-authors, entitled 'Global warming transforms coral reef assemblages'. It is comprised of three separate excel files:</span></p><p><strong><span style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Verdana, sans-serif;">(1) Aerial Survey Data</span></strong></p><p><span style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Verdana, sans-serif;">Aerial surveys were conducted in March and April 2016 to measure the geographic extent and severity of bleaching on the Great Barrier Reef. Each of 1,156 individual reefs was scored into one of five bleaching categories: (0) less than 1% of corals bleached, (1) 1-10%, (2) 10-30%, (3) 30-60%, and (4) more than 60% of corals bleached. The accuracy of the aerial scores was ground-truthed by measuring the extent of bleaching underwater on 104 reefs, also during March/April 2016. The aerial surveys were conducted throughout the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park and Torres Strait between Australia and Papua New Guinea, from the coast of Queensland to the outermost reefs, and along the entire Reef from latitudes 9.5-23.5°S.</span></p><p><span style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Verdana, sans-serif;">The aerial bleaching scores were subsequently converted into mortality estimates using a calibration curve based on underwater measurements of coral losses. </span></p><p><span style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Verdana, sans-serif;">The dataset contains the following information:</span></p><p><span style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Verdana, sans-serif;">Reef identification (ReefID, ReefName, Longitude, Latitude)</span></p><p><span style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Verdana, sans-serif;">BleachingCategory (categories described above ranging from 0 – 5)</span></p><p><span style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Verdana, sans-serif;">ChangeCover (%) (the estimate of mortality for a giving bleaching category, described above)</span></p><p><strong><span style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Verdana, sans-serif;">(2) In Water Survey Data </span></strong></p><p><span style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Verdana, sans-serif;">At the same time as the aerial surveys, in-water surveys of 63 reefs were conducted to assess levels of coral cover and initial mortality of different taxa due to heat stress. On each reef, the extent of bleaching and mortality on individual coral colonies was measured at two sites using five 10 x 1 m belt transects placed on the reef crest at a depth of 2 m. Longer-term coral loss was measured at the same 63 reefs in October and November 2016, eight months after the initial in-water surveys. </span></p><p><span style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Verdana, sans-serif;">Heat stress on the Great Barrier Reef in 2016 was quantified at 5 km resolution, using the NOAA Coral Reef Watch version 3 Degree Heating Week (DHW) metric.</span></p><p><span style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Verdana, sans-serif;">The dataset contains the following information:</span></p><p><span style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Verdana, sans-serif;">ReefID</span></p><p><span style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Verdana, sans-serif;">Heat stress (in degree Centigrade weeks, see above description)</span></p><p><span style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Verdana, sans-serif;">InstantMortality (the percentage of colonies that died instantaneously during the mass bleaching event)</span></p><p><span style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Verdana, sans-serif;">PercentBleached (%) (the percentage of colonies that were bleached during the mass bleaching event)</span></p><p><span style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Verdana, sans-serif;">ChangeInCover (the difference between final coral cover and initial coral cover (including recently dead coral), both values were log10-transformed prior to calculating the change in cover)</span></p><p><span style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Verdana, sans-serif;">DeltaMDS (the before-after shift in taxonomic composition for a given reef space based on a non-metric multi-dimensional scaling analysis of coral assemblages, see below for description)</span></p><p><strong><span style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Verdana, sans-serif;">(3) Taxonomic Data</span></strong></p><p><span style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Verdana, sans-serif;">The in-water surveys described above, were conducted at a fine taxonomic resolution. To include all species, the majority of which are too rare to analyse individually, we pooled them into 15 ecologically cohesive groups depending on their morphology, life history, and taxonomy. Three of the 15 are ubiquitous species or species complexes: Pocillopora damicornis, Seriatopora hystrix, and Stylophora pistillata. In each of the multi-species groups, the dominant species or genera on reef crests were: Other Acropora (<em>A. gemmifera, A. humilis, A. loripes, A. nasuta, A. secale, A. tenuis, A. valida</em>); Favids (i.e. species and genera from the formerly recognized Family Faviidae - Cyphastrea, Favia, Favites, Goniastrea, Leptastrea, Montastrea, Platygyra); Mussidae (Lobophyllia, Symphyllia); Isopora (<em>I. palifera, I. cuneata</em>); Other Pocillopora (<em>P. meandrina, P. verrucosa</em>); Other sessile animals (sponges, tunicates, molluscs); Porites (<em>P. annae, P. lobata</em>);  Montipora (<em>M. foliosa, M. grisea, M. hispida, M. montasteriata, M. tuberculosa</em>); Staghorn Acropora (<em>A. florida, A. intermedia, A. microphthalma, A. muricata, A. robusta</em>); Soft Corals (alcyonaceans, zooanthids); and Tabular Acropora (<em>A. cytherea, A. hyacinthus, A. anthocercis</em>).</span></p><p><span style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Verdana, sans-serif;">The coral cover for each of the 15 taxonomic categories has been provided for the initial surveys in March and April 2016 and the later surveys in October and November 2016. These data were used to generate the nMDS analysis discussed above. The shift in composition is measured as the Euclidean distance between the initial and final nMDS values for each location.</span></p><p><span style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Verdana, sans-serif;">The dataset contains the following information:</span></p><p><span style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Verdana, sans-serif;">ReefID as rows</span></p><p><span style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Verdana, sans-serif;">Taxonomic Category (e.g. Isopora) as columns</span></p>", "<p class="MsoNormal"><span lang="EN-US" style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Verdana, sans-serif;">This dataset is available as 3 spreadsheets in MS Excel (.xlsx) and Open Document formats (.ods) </span></p><p> </p><p class="MsoNormal"><span lang="EN-US" style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Verdana, sans-serif;"> </span></p>", "note", "<p class="MsoNormal"><span lang="EN-US" style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Verdana, sans-serif;">This dataset is available as 3 spreadsheets in MS Excel (.xlsx) and Open Document formats (.ods) </span></p><p> </p><p class="MsoNormal"><span lang="EN-US" style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Verdana, sans-serif;"> </span></p>", ""] ["<p><span style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Verdana, sans-serif;">This dataset supports the 2018 <em>Nature</em> publication by Terry Hughes and 15 co-authors, entitled 'Global warming transforms coral reef assemblages'. It is comprised of three separate excel files:</span></p><p><span style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Verdana, sans-serif;">(1) Aerial Survey Data - which gives aerial scores of bleaching severity for 1156 coral reefs on the Great Barrier Reef in March/April 2016.</span></p><p><span style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Verdana, sans-serif;">(2) In Water Survey Data - which gives data for instantaneous and longer-term mortality (March 2016 to November 2016) of corals, and associated heat stress for 63 reefs on the Great Barrier Reef.</span></p><p><span style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Verdana, sans-serif;">(3) Taxonomic Data - which gives benthic cover data for 15 individual taxa at two time points: (a) during the peak of the 2016 mass coral bleaching event (March 2016) and (b) eight months later (November 2016).</span></p>", "brief", "<p><span style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Verdana, sans-serif;">This dataset supports the 2018 <em>Nature</em> publication by Terry Hughes and 15 co-authors, entitled 'Global warming transforms coral reef assemblages'. It is comprised of three separate excel files:</span></p><p><span style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Verdana, sans-serif;">(1) Aerial Survey Data - which gives aerial scores of bleaching severity for 1156 coral reefs on the Great Barrier Reef in March/April 2016.</span></p><p><span style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Verdana, sans-serif;">(2) In Water Survey Data - which gives data for instantaneous and longer-term mortality (March 2016 to November 2016) of corals, and associated heat stress for 63 reefs on the Great Barrier Reef.</span></p><p><span style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Verdana, sans-serif;">(3) Taxonomic Data - which gives benthic cover data for 15 individual taxa at two time points: (a) during the peak of the 2016 mass coral bleaching event (March 2016) and (b) eight months later (November 2016).</span></p>", "<p><span style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Verdana, sans-serif;">This dataset supports the 2018 <em>Nature</em> publication by Terry Hughes and 15 co-authors, entitled 'Global warming transforms coral reef assemblages'. It is comprised of three separate excel files:</span></p><p><strong><span style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Verdana, sans-serif;">(1) Aerial Survey Data</span></strong></p><p><span style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Verdana, sans-serif;">Aerial surveys were conducted in March and April 2016 to measure the geographic extent and severity of bleaching on the Great Barrier Reef. Each of 1,156 individual reefs was scored into one of five bleaching categories: (0) less than 1% of corals bleached, (1) 1-10%, (2) 10-30%, (3) 30-60%, and (4) more than 60% of corals bleached. The accuracy of the aerial scores was ground-truthed by measuring the extent of bleaching underwater on 104 reefs, also during March/April 2016. The aerial surveys were conducted throughout the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park and Torres Strait between Australia and Papua New Guinea, from the coast of Queensland to the outermost reefs, and along the entire Reef from latitudes 9.5-23.5°S.</span></p><p><span style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Verdana, sans-serif;">The aerial bleaching scores were subsequently converted into mortality estimates using a calibration curve based on underwater measurements of coral losses. </span></p><p><span style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Verdana, sans-serif;">The dataset contains the following information:</span></p><p><span style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Verdana, sans-serif;">Reef identification (ReefID, ReefName, Longitude, Latitude)</span></p><p><span style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Verdana, sans-serif;">BleachingCategory (categories described above ranging from 0 – 5)</span></p><p><span style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Verdana, sans-serif;">ChangeCover (%) (the estimate of mortality for a giving bleaching category, described above)</span></p><p><strong><span style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Verdana, sans-serif;">(2) In Water Survey Data </span></strong></p><p><span style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Verdana, sans-serif;">At the same time as the aerial surveys, in-water surveys of 63 reefs were conducted to assess levels of coral cover and initial mortality of different taxa due to heat stress. On each reef, the extent of bleaching and mortality on individual coral colonies was measured at two sites using five 10 x 1 m belt transects placed on the reef crest at a depth of 2 m. Longer-term coral loss was measured at the same 63 reefs in October and November 2016, eight months after the initial in-water surveys. </span></p><p><span style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Verdana, sans-serif;">Heat stress on the Great Barrier Reef in 2016 was quantified at 5 km resolution, using the NOAA Coral Reef Watch version 3 Degree Heating Week (DHW) metric.</span></p><p><span style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Verdana, sans-serif;">The dataset contains the following information:</span></p><p><span style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Verdana, sans-serif;">ReefID</span></p><p><span style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Verdana, sans-serif;">Heat stress (in degree Centigrade weeks, see above description)</span></p><p><span style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Verdana, sans-serif;">InstantMortality (the percentage of colonies that died instantaneously during the mass bleaching event)</span></p><p><span style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Verdana, sans-serif;">PercentBleached (%) (the percentage of colonies that were bleached during the mass bleaching event)</span></p><p><span style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Verdana, sans-serif;">ChangeInCover (the difference between final coral cover and initial coral cover (including recently dead coral), both values were log10-transformed prior to calculating the change in cover)</span></p><p><span style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Verdana, sans-serif;">DeltaMDS (the before-after shift in taxonomic composition for a given reef space based on a non-metric multi-dimensional scaling analysis of coral assemblages, see below for description)</span></p><p><strong><span style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Verdana, sans-serif;">(3) Taxonomic Data</span></strong></p><p><span style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Verdana, sans-serif;">The in-water surveys described above, were conducted at a fine taxonomic resolution. To include all species, the majority of which are too rare to analyse individually, we pooled them into 15 ecologically cohesive groups depending on their morphology, life history, and taxonomy. Three of the 15 are ubiquitous species or species complexes: Pocillopora damicornis, Seriatopora hystrix, and Stylophora pistillata. In each of the multi-species groups, the dominant species or genera on reef crests were: Other Acropora (<em>A. gemmifera, A. humilis, A. loripes, A. nasuta, A. secale, A. tenuis, A. valida</em>); Favids (i.e. species and genera from the formerly recognized Family Faviidae - Cyphastrea, Favia, Favites, Goniastrea, Leptastrea, Montastrea, Platygyra); Mussidae (Lobophyllia, Symphyllia); Isopora (<em>I. palifera, I. cuneata</em>); Other Pocillopora (<em>P. meandrina, P. verrucosa</em>); Other sessile animals (sponges, tunicates, molluscs); Porites (<em>P. annae, P. lobata</em>);  Montipora (<em>M. foliosa, M. grisea, M. hispida, M. montasteriata, M. tuberculosa</em>); Staghorn Acropora (<em>A. florida, A. intermedia, A. microphthalma, A. muricata, A. robusta</em>); Soft Corals (alcyonaceans, zooanthids); and Tabular Acropora (<em>A. cytherea, A. hyacinthus, A. anthocercis</em>).</span></p><p><span style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Verdana, sans-serif;">The coral cover for each of the 15 taxonomic categories has been provided for the initial surveys in March and April 2016 and the later surveys in October and November 2016. These data were used to generate the nMDS analysis discussed above. The shift in composition is measured as the Euclidean distance between the initial and final nMDS values for each location.</span></p><p><span style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Verdana, sans-serif;">The dataset contains the following information:</span></p><p><span style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Verdana, sans-serif;">ReefID as rows</span></p><p><span style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Verdana, sans-serif;">Taxonomic Category (e.g. Isopora) as columns</span></p>", "full", "<p><span style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Verdana, sans-serif;">This dataset supports the 2018 <em>Nature</em> publication by Terry Hughes and 15 co-authors, entitled 'Global warming transforms coral reef assemblages'. It is comprised of three separate excel files:</span></p><p><strong><span style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Verdana, sans-serif;">(1) Aerial Survey Data</span></strong></p><p><span style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Verdana, sans-serif;">Aerial surveys were conducted in March and April 2016 to measure the geographic extent and severity of bleaching on the Great Barrier Reef. Each of 1,156 individual reefs was scored into one of five bleaching categories: (0) less than 1% of corals bleached, (1) 1-10%, (2) 10-30%, (3) 30-60%, and (4) more than 60% of corals bleached. The accuracy of the aerial scores was ground-truthed by measuring the extent of bleaching underwater on 104 reefs, also during March/April 2016. The aerial surveys were conducted throughout the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park and Torres Strait between Australia and Papua New Guinea, from the coast of Queensland to the outermost reefs, and along the entire Reef from latitudes 9.5-23.5°S.</span></p><p><span style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Verdana, sans-serif;">The aerial bleaching scores were subsequently converted into mortality estimates using a calibration curve based on underwater measurements of coral losses. </span></p><p><span style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Verdana, sans-serif;">The dataset contains the following information:</span></p><p><span style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Verdana, sans-serif;">Reef identification (ReefID, ReefName, Longitude, Latitude)</span></p><p><span style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Verdana, sans-serif;">BleachingCategory (categories described above ranging from 0 – 5)</span></p><p><span style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Verdana, sans-serif;">ChangeCover (%) (the estimate of mortality for a giving bleaching category, described above)</span></p><p><strong><span style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Verdana, sans-serif;">(2) In Water Survey Data </span></strong></p><p><span style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Verdana, sans-serif;">At the same time as the aerial surveys, in-water surveys of 63 reefs were conducted to assess levels of coral cover and initial mortality of different taxa due to heat stress. On each reef, the extent of bleaching and mortality on individual coral colonies was measured at two sites using five 10 x 1 m belt transects placed on the reef crest at a depth of 2 m. Longer-term coral loss was measured at the same 63 reefs in October and November 2016, eight months after the initial in-water surveys. </span></p><p><span style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Verdana, sans-serif;">Heat stress on the Great Barrier Reef in 2016 was quantified at 5 km resolution, using the NOAA Coral Reef Watch version 3 Degree Heating Week (DHW) metric.</span></p><p><span style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Verdana, sans-serif;">The dataset contains the following information:</span></p><p><span style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Verdana, sans-serif;">ReefID</span></p><p><span style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Verdana, sans-serif;">Heat stress (in degree Centigrade weeks, see above description)</span></p><p><span style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Verdana, sans-serif;">InstantMortality (the percentage of colonies that died instantaneously during the mass bleaching event)</span></p><p><span style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Verdana, sans-serif;">PercentBleached (%) (the percentage of colonies that were bleached during the mass bleaching event)</span></p><p><span style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Verdana, sans-serif;">ChangeInCover (the difference between final coral cover and initial coral cover (including recently dead coral), both values were log10-transformed prior to calculating the change in cover)</span></p><p><span style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Verdana, sans-serif;">DeltaMDS (the before-after shift in taxonomic composition for a given reef space based on a non-metric multi-dimensional scaling analysis of coral assemblages, see below for description)</span></p><p><strong><span style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Verdana, sans-serif;">(3) Taxonomic Data</span></strong></p><p><span style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Verdana, sans-serif;">The in-water surveys described above, were conducted at a fine taxonomic resolution. To include all species, the majority of which are too rare to analyse individually, we pooled them into 15 ecologically cohesive groups depending on their morphology, life history, and taxonomy. Three of the 15 are ubiquitous species or species complexes: Pocillopora damicornis, Seriatopora hystrix, and Stylophora pistillata. In each of the multi-species groups, the dominant species or genera on reef crests were: Other Acropora (<em>A. gemmifera, A. humilis, A. loripes, A. nasuta, A. secale, A. tenuis, A. valida</em>); Favids (i.e. species and genera from the formerly recognized Family Faviidae - Cyphastrea, Favia, Favites, Goniastrea, Leptastrea, Montastrea, Platygyra); Mussidae (Lobophyllia, Symphyllia); Isopora (<em>I. palifera, I. cuneata</em>); Other Pocillopora (<em>P. meandrina, P. verrucosa</em>); Other sessile animals (sponges, tunicates, molluscs); Porites (<em>P. annae, P. lobata</em>);  Montipora (<em>M. foliosa, M. grisea, M. hispida, M. montasteriata, M. tuberculosa</em>); Staghorn Acropora (<em>A. florida, A. intermedia, A. microphthalma, A. muricata, A. robusta</em>); Soft Corals (alcyonaceans, zooanthids); and Tabular Acropora (<em>A. cytherea, A. hyacinthus, A. anthocercis</em>).</span></p><p><span style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Verdana, sans-serif;">The coral cover for each of the 15 taxonomic categories has been provided for the initial surveys in March and April 2016 and the later surveys in October and November 2016. These data were used to generate the nMDS analysis discussed above. The shift in composition is measured as the Euclidean distance between the initial and final nMDS values for each location.</span></p><p><span style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Verdana, sans-serif;">The dataset contains the following information:</span></p><p><span style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Verdana, sans-serif;">ReefID as rows</span></p><p><span style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Verdana, sans-serif;">Taxonomic Category (e.g. Isopora) as columns</span></p>", "<p class="MsoNormal"><span lang="EN-US" style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Verdana, sans-serif;">This dataset is available as 3 spreadsheets in MS Excel (.xlsx) and Open Document formats (.ods) </span></p><p> </p><p class="MsoNormal"><span lang="EN-US" style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Verdana, sans-serif;"> </span></p>", "note", "<p class="MsoNormal"><span lang="EN-US" style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Verdana, sans-serif;">This dataset is available as 3 spreadsheets in MS Excel (.xlsx) and Open Document formats (.ods) </span></p><p> </p><p class="MsoNormal"><span lang="EN-US" style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Verdana, sans-serif;"> </span></p>", ""]