Published Objects Dugong Aerial Survey (Cetacean, Dugong, Turtle) Southern Great Barrier Reef, 2005 November fascinator 749407c5a2b04f032aaa7e842880ca3a 2019-03-15T12:55:46Z ["brief", "full", "note", "full", "<p>Sighting for dugong, cetacean and turtle species in the Southern Great Barrier Reef area during the dugong aerial surveys in November 2005.</p>", "<p>Sighting for dugong, cetacean and turtle species in the Southern Great Barrier Reef area during the dugong aerial surveys in November 2005.</p>", "<p>The transitional funding from MTSRF plus supplementary funding from CRC Reef and CRC Torres Strait enabled the first survey of the entire urban coast of Queensland for dugongs to be carried out in November 2005. In addition, a reference block in Torres Strait was surveyed to provide a context for the survey of the urban coast. The results of the 2005 surveys are being presented to Traditional Owners and stakeholders at a series of workshops. The results of the 2005 survey have been analyzed in the context of results of pervious surveys of various parts of this coast since the mid 1980s using comparable techniques. The results of the 20 year time series of surveys suggest that dugong numbers are now stable at the scale of the entire urban coast of Queensland although populations fluctuate at the level of individual survey blocks (usually bays), probably largely due to natural changes in seagrass habitats. The results of the surveys indicate that it will be important to: (1) develop cross-jurisdictional objectives for the management of dugongs at the scale of the entire region, and (2) co-ordinate management at both culturally and ecologically relevant scales.</p>", "<p>The transitional funding from MTSRF plus supplementary funding from CRC Reef and CRC Torres Strait enabled the first survey of the entire urban coast of Queensland for dugongs to be carried out in November 2005. In addition, a reference block in Torres Strait was surveyed to provide a context for the survey of the urban coast. The results of the 2005 surveys are being presented to Traditional Owners and stakeholders at a series of workshops. The results of the 2005 survey have been analyzed in the context of results of pervious surveys of various parts of this coast since the mid 1980s using comparable techniques. The results of the 20 year time series of surveys suggest that dugong numbers are now stable at the scale of the entire urban coast of Queensland although populations fluctuate at the level of individual survey blocks (usually bays), probably largely due to natural changes in seagrass habitats. The results of the surveys indicate that it will be important to: (1) develop cross-jurisdictional objectives for the management of dugongs at the scale of the entire region, and (2) co-ordinate management at both culturally and ecologically relevant scales.</p>", "<p>Please contact Helene Marsh Helene.Marsh@jcu.edu.au for GIS data. Funding for these surveys was obtained from the following government agencies: - Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority (GBRMPA), - Department of Environment and Resource Management (DERM), - Australian Marine Mammal Centre (AMMC), - Torres Strait Regional Authority (TSRA), - Australian Fisheries Management Authority (AFMA), - Marine and Tropical Sciences Research Facility (MTSRF), - National Environmental Research Program (NERP).</p>", "<p>Please contact Helene Marsh Helene.Marsh@jcu.edu.au for GIS data. Funding for these surveys was obtained from the following government agencies: - Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority (GBRMPA), - Department of Environment and Resource Management (DERM), - Australian Marine Mammal Centre (AMMC), - Torres Strait Regional Authority (TSRA), - Australian Fisheries Management Authority (AFMA), - Marine and Tropical Sciences Research Facility (MTSRF), - National Environmental Research Program (NERP).</p>", ""] ["brief", "full", "note", "full", "<p>Sighting for dugong, cetacean and turtle species in the Southern Great Barrier Reef area during the dugong aerial surveys in November 2005.</p>", "<p>Sighting for dugong, cetacean and turtle species in the Southern Great Barrier Reef area during the dugong aerial surveys in November 2005.</p>", "<p>The transitional funding from MTSRF plus supplementary funding from CRC Reef and CRC Torres Strait enabled the first survey of the entire urban coast of Queensland for dugongs to be carried out in November 2005. In addition, a reference block in Torres Strait was surveyed to provide a context for the survey of the urban coast. The results of the 2005 surveys are being presented to Traditional Owners and stakeholders at a series of workshops. The results of the 2005 survey have been analyzed in the context of results of pervious surveys of various parts of this coast since the mid 1980s using comparable techniques. The results of the 20 year time series of surveys suggest that dugong numbers are now stable at the scale of the entire urban coast of Queensland although populations fluctuate at the level of individual survey blocks (usually bays), probably largely due to natural changes in seagrass habitats. The results of the surveys indicate that it will be important to: (1) develop cross-jurisdictional objectives for the management of dugongs at the scale of the entire region, and (2) co-ordinate management at both culturally and ecologically relevant scales.</p>", "<p>The transitional funding from MTSRF plus supplementary funding from CRC Reef and CRC Torres Strait enabled the first survey of the entire urban coast of Queensland for dugongs to be carried out in November 2005. In addition, a reference block in Torres Strait was surveyed to provide a context for the survey of the urban coast. The results of the 2005 surveys are being presented to Traditional Owners and stakeholders at a series of workshops. The results of the 2005 survey have been analyzed in the context of results of pervious surveys of various parts of this coast since the mid 1980s using comparable techniques. The results of the 20 year time series of surveys suggest that dugong numbers are now stable at the scale of the entire urban coast of Queensland although populations fluctuate at the level of individual survey blocks (usually bays), probably largely due to natural changes in seagrass habitats. The results of the surveys indicate that it will be important to: (1) develop cross-jurisdictional objectives for the management of dugongs at the scale of the entire region, and (2) co-ordinate management at both culturally and ecologically relevant scales.</p>", "<p>Please contact Helene Marsh Helene.Marsh@jcu.edu.au for GIS data. Funding for these surveys was obtained from the following government agencies: - Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority (GBRMPA), - Department of Environment and Resource Management (DERM), - Australian Marine Mammal Centre (AMMC), - Torres Strait Regional Authority (TSRA), - Australian Fisheries Management Authority (AFMA), - Marine and Tropical Sciences Research Facility (MTSRF), - National Environmental Research Program (NERP).</p>", "<p>Please contact Helene Marsh Helene.Marsh@jcu.edu.au for GIS data. Funding for these surveys was obtained from the following government agencies: - Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority (GBRMPA), - Department of Environment and Resource Management (DERM), - Australian Marine Mammal Centre (AMMC), - Torres Strait Regional Authority (TSRA), - Australian Fisheries Management Authority (AFMA), - Marine and Tropical Sciences Research Facility (MTSRF), - National Environmental Research Program (NERP).</p>", ""] Dugong Aerial Survey (cetacean, dugong, turtle) Exmouth and Ningaloo Reef, 1994 fascinator cd524516daee0c7551884d31a080129a 2019-03-15T12:58:07Z ["brief", "full", "note", "note", "full", "full", "<p>Sighting for dugongs, cetaceans and marine turtles the in Exmouth and Ningaloo Reef area during the dugong aerials surveys in 1994.</p>", "<p>Sighting for dugongs, cetaceans and marine turtles the in Exmouth and Ningaloo Reef area during the dugong aerials surveys in 1994.</p>", "<p>Strip-transect aerial surveys of Shark Bay, Ningaloo Reef and Exmouth Gulf were conducted during the winters of 1989 and 1994. These surveys were designed primarily to estimate the abundance and distribution of dugongs, although they also allowed sea turtles and dolphins, and, to a lesser extent, whales, manta rays and whale sharks to be surveyed. Shark Bay contains a large population of dugongs that is of international significance. Estimates of approximately 10000 dugongs resulted from both surveys. The density of dugongs is the highest recorded in Australia and the Middle East, where these surveys have been conducted. Exmouth Gulf and Ningaloo Reef are also important dugong habitats, each supporting in the order of 1000 dugongs. The estimated number of turtles in Shark Bay is comparable to the number in Exmouth Gulf plus Ningaloo Reef (7000-9000). The density of turtles in Ningaloo Reef and, to a lesser extent, Exmouth Gulf is exceptionally high compared with most other areas that have been surveyed by the same technique. Shark Bay supports a substantial population of bottlenose dolphins (2000-3000 minimum estimate). Exmouth Gulf and Ningaloo Reef were not significant habitats for dolphins during the winter surveys. Substantial numbers of whales (primarily humpbacks) and manta rays occur in northern and western Shark Bay in winter. Ningaloo Reef is an important area for whale sharks and manta rays in autumn and winter. The Shark Bay Marine Park excludes much of the winter habitats of the large vertebrate fauna of Shark Bay. In 1989 and 1994, more than half of all the dugongs were seen outside the Marine Park (57.4 and 50.7%, respectively). Approximately one-third to one-half of turtles and dolphins were seen outside the Marine Park (in 1989 and 1994 respectively: turtles, 43 and 27%; dolphins, 47 and 32%). Almost all the whales and most of the manta rays were seen outside the Marine Park. Expansion of the Shark Bay Marine Park, to bring it into alignment with the marine section of the Shark Bay World Heritage Area, would facilitate the appropriate management of these populations. This would also simplify the State-Commonwealth collaboration necessary to meet the obligations of World Heritage listing. The coastal waters of Western Australia north of the surveyed area (over 6000 km of coastline) are relatively poorly known and surveys of their marine megafauna are required for wise planning and management.</p>", "<p>Strip-transect aerial surveys of Shark Bay, Ningaloo Reef and Exmouth Gulf were conducted during the winters of 1989 and 1994. These surveys were designed primarily to estimate the abundance and distribution of dugongs, although they also allowed sea turtles and dolphins, and, to a lesser extent, whales, manta rays and whale sharks to be surveyed. Shark Bay contains a large population of dugongs that is of international significance. Estimates of approximately 10000 dugongs resulted from both surveys. The density of dugongs is the highest recorded in Australia and the Middle East, where these surveys have been conducted. Exmouth Gulf and Ningaloo Reef are also important dugong habitats, each supporting in the order of 1000 dugongs. The estimated number of turtles in Shark Bay is comparable to the number in Exmouth Gulf plus Ningaloo Reef (7000-9000). The density of turtles in Ningaloo Reef and, to a lesser extent, Exmouth Gulf is exceptionally high compared with most other areas that have been surveyed by the same technique. Shark Bay supports a substantial population of bottlenose dolphins (2000-3000 minimum estimate). Exmouth Gulf and Ningaloo Reef were not significant habitats for dolphins during the winter surveys. Substantial numbers of whales (primarily humpbacks) and manta rays occur in northern and western Shark Bay in winter. Ningaloo Reef is an important area for whale sharks and manta rays in autumn and winter. The Shark Bay Marine Park excludes much of the winter habitats of the large vertebrate fauna of Shark Bay. In 1989 and 1994, more than half of all the dugongs were seen outside the Marine Park (57.4 and 50.7%, respectively). Approximately one-third to one-half of turtles and dolphins were seen outside the Marine Park (in 1989 and 1994 respectively: turtles, 43 and 27%; dolphins, 47 and 32%). Almost all the whales and most of the manta rays were seen outside the Marine Park. Expansion of the Shark Bay Marine Park, to bring it into alignment with the marine section of the Shark Bay World Heritage Area, would facilitate the appropriate management of these populations. This would also simplify the State-Commonwealth collaboration necessary to meet the obligations of World Heritage listing. The coastal waters of Western Australia north of the surveyed area (over 6000 km of coastline) are relatively poorly known and surveys of their marine megafauna are required for wise planning and management.</p>", "<p>Funding for these surveys was obtained from the following government agencies: - Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority (GBRMPA), - Department of Environment and Resource Management (DERM), - Australian Marine Mammal Centre (AMMC), - Torres Strait Regional Authority (TSRA), - Australian Fisheries Management Authority (AFMA), - Marine and Tropical Sciences Research Facility (MTSRF), - National Environmental Research Program (NERP).</p>", "<p>Funding for these surveys was obtained from the following government agencies: - Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority (GBRMPA), - Department of Environment and Resource Management (DERM), - Australian Marine Mammal Centre (AMMC), - Torres Strait Regional Authority (TSRA), - Australian Fisheries Management Authority (AFMA), - Marine and Tropical Sciences Research Facility (MTSRF), - National Environmental Research Program (NERP).</p>", "<p>This dataset consists of transect maps (jpg), additional metadata (pdf) and a report (pdf). Please contact Helene Marsh Helene.Marsh@jcu.edu.au for GIS data.</p>", "<p>This dataset consists of transect maps (jpg), additional metadata (pdf) and a report (pdf). Please contact Helene Marsh Helene.Marsh@jcu.edu.au for GIS data.</p>", ""] ["brief", "full", "note", "note", "full", "full", "<p>Sighting for dugongs, cetaceans and marine turtles the in Exmouth and Ningaloo Reef area during the dugong aerials surveys in 1994.</p>", "<p>Sighting for dugongs, cetaceans and marine turtles the in Exmouth and Ningaloo Reef area during the dugong aerials surveys in 1994.</p>", "<p>Strip-transect aerial surveys of Shark Bay, Ningaloo Reef and Exmouth Gulf were conducted during the winters of 1989 and 1994. These surveys were designed primarily to estimate the abundance and distribution of dugongs, although they also allowed sea turtles and dolphins, and, to a lesser extent, whales, manta rays and whale sharks to be surveyed. Shark Bay contains a large population of dugongs that is of international significance. Estimates of approximately 10000 dugongs resulted from both surveys. The density of dugongs is the highest recorded in Australia and the Middle East, where these surveys have been conducted. Exmouth Gulf and Ningaloo Reef are also important dugong habitats, each supporting in the order of 1000 dugongs. The estimated number of turtles in Shark Bay is comparable to the number in Exmouth Gulf plus Ningaloo Reef (7000-9000). The density of turtles in Ningaloo Reef and, to a lesser extent, Exmouth Gulf is exceptionally high compared with most other areas that have been surveyed by the same technique. Shark Bay supports a substantial population of bottlenose dolphins (2000-3000 minimum estimate). Exmouth Gulf and Ningaloo Reef were not significant habitats for dolphins during the winter surveys. Substantial numbers of whales (primarily humpbacks) and manta rays occur in northern and western Shark Bay in winter. Ningaloo Reef is an important area for whale sharks and manta rays in autumn and winter. The Shark Bay Marine Park excludes much of the winter habitats of the large vertebrate fauna of Shark Bay. In 1989 and 1994, more than half of all the dugongs were seen outside the Marine Park (57.4 and 50.7%, respectively). Approximately one-third to one-half of turtles and dolphins were seen outside the Marine Park (in 1989 and 1994 respectively: turtles, 43 and 27%; dolphins, 47 and 32%). Almost all the whales and most of the manta rays were seen outside the Marine Park. Expansion of the Shark Bay Marine Park, to bring it into alignment with the marine section of the Shark Bay World Heritage Area, would facilitate the appropriate management of these populations. This would also simplify the State-Commonwealth collaboration necessary to meet the obligations of World Heritage listing. The coastal waters of Western Australia north of the surveyed area (over 6000 km of coastline) are relatively poorly known and surveys of their marine megafauna are required for wise planning and management.</p>", "<p>Strip-transect aerial surveys of Shark Bay, Ningaloo Reef and Exmouth Gulf were conducted during the winters of 1989 and 1994. These surveys were designed primarily to estimate the abundance and distribution of dugongs, although they also allowed sea turtles and dolphins, and, to a lesser extent, whales, manta rays and whale sharks to be surveyed. Shark Bay contains a large population of dugongs that is of international significance. Estimates of approximately 10000 dugongs resulted from both surveys. The density of dugongs is the highest recorded in Australia and the Middle East, where these surveys have been conducted. Exmouth Gulf and Ningaloo Reef are also important dugong habitats, each supporting in the order of 1000 dugongs. The estimated number of turtles in Shark Bay is comparable to the number in Exmouth Gulf plus Ningaloo Reef (7000-9000). The density of turtles in Ningaloo Reef and, to a lesser extent, Exmouth Gulf is exceptionally high compared with most other areas that have been surveyed by the same technique. Shark Bay supports a substantial population of bottlenose dolphins (2000-3000 minimum estimate). Exmouth Gulf and Ningaloo Reef were not significant habitats for dolphins during the winter surveys. Substantial numbers of whales (primarily humpbacks) and manta rays occur in northern and western Shark Bay in winter. Ningaloo Reef is an important area for whale sharks and manta rays in autumn and winter. The Shark Bay Marine Park excludes much of the winter habitats of the large vertebrate fauna of Shark Bay. In 1989 and 1994, more than half of all the dugongs were seen outside the Marine Park (57.4 and 50.7%, respectively). Approximately one-third to one-half of turtles and dolphins were seen outside the Marine Park (in 1989 and 1994 respectively: turtles, 43 and 27%; dolphins, 47 and 32%). Almost all the whales and most of the manta rays were seen outside the Marine Park. Expansion of the Shark Bay Marine Park, to bring it into alignment with the marine section of the Shark Bay World Heritage Area, would facilitate the appropriate management of these populations. This would also simplify the State-Commonwealth collaboration necessary to meet the obligations of World Heritage listing. The coastal waters of Western Australia north of the surveyed area (over 6000 km of coastline) are relatively poorly known and surveys of their marine megafauna are required for wise planning and management.</p>", "<p>Funding for these surveys was obtained from the following government agencies: - Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority (GBRMPA), - Department of Environment and Resource Management (DERM), - Australian Marine Mammal Centre (AMMC), - Torres Strait Regional Authority (TSRA), - Australian Fisheries Management Authority (AFMA), - Marine and Tropical Sciences Research Facility (MTSRF), - National Environmental Research Program (NERP).</p>", "<p>Funding for these surveys was obtained from the following government agencies: - Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority (GBRMPA), - Department of Environment and Resource Management (DERM), - Australian Marine Mammal Centre (AMMC), - Torres Strait Regional Authority (TSRA), - Australian Fisheries Management Authority (AFMA), - Marine and Tropical Sciences Research Facility (MTSRF), - National Environmental Research Program (NERP).</p>", "<p>This dataset consists of transect maps (jpg), additional metadata (pdf) and a report (pdf). Please contact Helene Marsh Helene.Marsh@jcu.edu.au for GIS data.</p>", "<p>This dataset consists of transect maps (jpg), additional metadata (pdf) and a report (pdf). Please contact Helene Marsh Helene.Marsh@jcu.edu.au for GIS data.</p>", ""] Dugong Aerial Survey (dugongs, cetaceans) Southern Great Barrier Reef, September 1987 fascinator 1da81a9de1a4884241789ab954428f69 2019-03-15T12:55:56Z ["brief", "note", "full", "<p>Sighting for dugongs in the Southern Great Barrier Reef area during the dugong aerials surveys in September 1987.</p>", "<p>Sighting for dugongs in the Southern Great Barrier Reef area during the dugong aerials surveys in September 1987.</p>", "<p>Please contact Helene Marsh Helene.Marsh@jcu.edu.au for GIS data. Funding for these surveys was obtained from the following government agencies: - Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority (GBRMPA), - Department of Environment and Resource Management (DERM), - Australian Marine Mammal Centre (AMMC), - Torres Strait Regional Authority (TSRA), - Australian Fisheries Management Authority (AFMA), - Marine and Tropical Sciences Research Facility (MTSRF), - National Environmental Research Program (NERP).</p>", "<p>Please contact Helene Marsh Helene.Marsh@jcu.edu.au for GIS data. Funding for these surveys was obtained from the following government agencies: - Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority (GBRMPA), - Department of Environment and Resource Management (DERM), - Australian Marine Mammal Centre (AMMC), - Torres Strait Regional Authority (TSRA), - Australian Fisheries Management Authority (AFMA), - Marine and Tropical Sciences Research Facility (MTSRF), - National Environmental Research Program (NERP).</p>", ""] ["brief", "note", "full", "<p>Sighting for dugongs in the Southern Great Barrier Reef area during the dugong aerials surveys in September 1987.</p>", "<p>Sighting for dugongs in the Southern Great Barrier Reef area during the dugong aerials surveys in September 1987.</p>", "<p>Please contact Helene Marsh Helene.Marsh@jcu.edu.au for GIS data. Funding for these surveys was obtained from the following government agencies: - Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority (GBRMPA), - Department of Environment and Resource Management (DERM), - Australian Marine Mammal Centre (AMMC), - Torres Strait Regional Authority (TSRA), - Australian Fisheries Management Authority (AFMA), - Marine and Tropical Sciences Research Facility (MTSRF), - National Environmental Research Program (NERP).</p>", "<p>Please contact Helene Marsh Helene.Marsh@jcu.edu.au for GIS data. Funding for these surveys was obtained from the following government agencies: - Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority (GBRMPA), - Department of Environment and Resource Management (DERM), - Australian Marine Mammal Centre (AMMC), - Torres Strait Regional Authority (TSRA), - Australian Fisheries Management Authority (AFMA), - Marine and Tropical Sciences Research Facility (MTSRF), - National Environmental Research Program (NERP).</p>", ""] Dugong Aerial Survey Database fascinator 70987a255de5bba750bd671901009ac3 2020-03-02T04:14:36Z ["<p>This dugong aerial survey database has been compiled as part of a project funded by the Australian Marine Mammal Centre (AMMC). It is MySQL based and currently contains data from 54 aerial surveys for dugongs in nine regions along the Australian coast since 1984 including: Shark Bay (WA), Exmouth (WA), Pilbara (WA), Gulf of Carpentaria (NT/QLD), Torres Strait, Northern Great Barrier Reef (QLD), Southern Great Barrier Reef (QLD), Hervey Bay (QLD), and Moreton Bay (QLD). The database has been made accessible to the general community via an open access online data hub based at James Cook University via https://dugongs.tropicaldatahub.org/. The database facilitates future collaborations and accommodates efficient incorporation of new research findings. Information on dugong distribution, habitat use and relative abundance are easily accessible to managers and other stakeholders for their long-term use.</p>", "<p>This dugong aerial survey database has been compiled as part of a project funded by the Australian Marine Mammal Centre (AMMC). It is MySQL based and currently contains data from 54 aerial surveys for dugongs in nine regions along the Australian coast since 1984 including: Shark Bay (WA), Exmouth (WA), Pilbara (WA), Gulf of Carpentaria (NT/QLD), Torres Strait, Northern Great Barrier Reef (QLD), Southern Great Barrier Reef (QLD), Hervey Bay (QLD), and Moreton Bay (QLD). The database has been made accessible to the general community via an open access online data hub based at James Cook University via https://dugongs.tropicaldatahub.org/. The database facilitates future collaborations and accommodates efficient incorporation of new research findings. Information on dugong distribution, habitat use and relative abundance are easily accessible to managers and other stakeholders for their long-term use.</p>", "brief", ""] ["<p>This dugong aerial survey database has been compiled as part of a project funded by the Australian Marine Mammal Centre (AMMC). It is MySQL based and currently contains data from 54 aerial surveys for dugongs in nine regions along the Australian coast since 1984 including: Shark Bay (WA), Exmouth (WA), Pilbara (WA), Gulf of Carpentaria (NT/QLD), Torres Strait, Northern Great Barrier Reef (QLD), Southern Great Barrier Reef (QLD), Hervey Bay (QLD), and Moreton Bay (QLD). The database has been made accessible to the general community via an open access online data hub based at James Cook University via https://dugongs.tropicaldatahub.org/. The database facilitates future collaborations and accommodates efficient incorporation of new research findings. Information on dugong distribution, habitat use and relative abundance are easily accessible to managers and other stakeholders for their long-term use.</p>", "<p>This dugong aerial survey database has been compiled as part of a project funded by the Australian Marine Mammal Centre (AMMC). It is MySQL based and currently contains data from 54 aerial surveys for dugongs in nine regions along the Australian coast since 1984 including: Shark Bay (WA), Exmouth (WA), Pilbara (WA), Gulf of Carpentaria (NT/QLD), Torres Strait, Northern Great Barrier Reef (QLD), Southern Great Barrier Reef (QLD), Hervey Bay (QLD), and Moreton Bay (QLD). The database has been made accessible to the general community via an open access online data hub based at James Cook University via https://dugongs.tropicaldatahub.org/. The database facilitates future collaborations and accommodates efficient incorporation of new research findings. Information on dugong distribution, habitat use and relative abundance are easily accessible to managers and other stakeholders for their long-term use.</p>", "brief", ""] Dugong aerial survey (cetacean, dugong and turtle) Northern Great Barrier Reef, 1984 November fascinator 2838aed17a01a994a47cc8580fdd6099 2019-03-15T12:54:31Z ["brief", "full", "note", "full", "<p>Sighting for dugongs, cetaceans and turtles in the Northern Great Barrier Reef area during the dugong aerials surveys in November 1984.</p>", "<p>Sighting for dugongs, cetaceans and turtles in the Northern Great Barrier Reef area during the dugong aerials surveys in November 1984.</p>", "<p>In November 1984, the waters of the Great Barrier Reef lagoon between Cape Bedford and Cape Melville were surveyed for dugongs. The inshore waters less than 21.5 km from the coast were surveyed at an intensity of about 13%, the offshore waters at an intensity of 4.7%. The survey returned a minimum estimate of 1105 ± 232 (S.E) dugongs for the area based on total counts. It is not possible to convert this minimum estimate into an absolute population estimate for the region because the number of dugongs sighted under aerial survey conditions has not been calibrated. However, preliminary experimental work indicates that even trained observers miss a significant proportion of dugongs visible on the transect line. In view of the large proportion of dugongs that are likely to be invisible below the water surface, it is obvious that these figures must considerably underestimate the number of dugongs actually present. Dugongs (including calves) were sighted up to 55 km from the coast, and using surfaces sightings as an index relative abundance, it was estimated that more that 60% of dugongs were more than 20 km from the coast at the time of the survey. 13% of the dugongs sighted were calves. A number of factors which could improve the accuracy and precision of dugong surveys have been examined. It was estimated that a minimum of 4906 ± 741 turtles were in the area at the time of the survey. No courting turtles were seen. Incidental sightings of rays, sea snakes, sharks, seagrass beds, Trichodesmium, and coral spawn have also been reported.</p>", "<p>In November 1984, the waters of the Great Barrier Reef lagoon between Cape Bedford and Cape Melville were surveyed for dugongs. The inshore waters less than 21.5 km from the coast were surveyed at an intensity of about 13%, the offshore waters at an intensity of 4.7%. The survey returned a minimum estimate of 1105 ± 232 (S.E) dugongs for the area based on total counts. It is not possible to convert this minimum estimate into an absolute population estimate for the region because the number of dugongs sighted under aerial survey conditions has not been calibrated. However, preliminary experimental work indicates that even trained observers miss a significant proportion of dugongs visible on the transect line. In view of the large proportion of dugongs that are likely to be invisible below the water surface, it is obvious that these figures must considerably underestimate the number of dugongs actually present. Dugongs (including calves) were sighted up to 55 km from the coast, and using surfaces sightings as an index relative abundance, it was estimated that more that 60% of dugongs were more than 20 km from the coast at the time of the survey. 13% of the dugongs sighted were calves. A number of factors which could improve the accuracy and precision of dugong surveys have been examined. It was estimated that a minimum of 4906 ± 741 turtles were in the area at the time of the survey. No courting turtles were seen. Incidental sightings of rays, sea snakes, sharks, seagrass beds, Trichodesmium, and coral spawn have also been reported.</p>", "<p>Funding for these surveys was obtained from the following government agencies: - Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority (GBRMPA), - Department of Environment and Resource Management (DERM), - Australian Marine Mammal Centre (AMMC), - Torres Strait Regional Authority (TSRA), - Australian Fisheries Management Authority (AFMA), - Marine and Tropical Sciences Research Facility (MTSRF), - National Environmental Research Program (NERP). GIS data can be obtained by contacting Helene Marsh Helene.Marsh@jcu.edu.au</p>", "<p>Funding for these surveys was obtained from the following government agencies: - Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority (GBRMPA), - Department of Environment and Resource Management (DERM), - Australian Marine Mammal Centre (AMMC), - Torres Strait Regional Authority (TSRA), - Australian Fisheries Management Authority (AFMA), - Marine and Tropical Sciences Research Facility (MTSRF), - National Environmental Research Program (NERP). GIS data can be obtained by contacting Helene Marsh Helene.Marsh@jcu.edu.au</p>", ""] ["brief", "full", "note", "full", "<p>Sighting for dugongs, cetaceans and turtles in the Northern Great Barrier Reef area during the dugong aerials surveys in November 1984.</p>", "<p>Sighting for dugongs, cetaceans and turtles in the Northern Great Barrier Reef area during the dugong aerials surveys in November 1984.</p>", "<p>In November 1984, the waters of the Great Barrier Reef lagoon between Cape Bedford and Cape Melville were surveyed for dugongs. The inshore waters less than 21.5 km from the coast were surveyed at an intensity of about 13%, the offshore waters at an intensity of 4.7%. The survey returned a minimum estimate of 1105 ± 232 (S.E) dugongs for the area based on total counts. It is not possible to convert this minimum estimate into an absolute population estimate for the region because the number of dugongs sighted under aerial survey conditions has not been calibrated. However, preliminary experimental work indicates that even trained observers miss a significant proportion of dugongs visible on the transect line. In view of the large proportion of dugongs that are likely to be invisible below the water surface, it is obvious that these figures must considerably underestimate the number of dugongs actually present. Dugongs (including calves) were sighted up to 55 km from the coast, and using surfaces sightings as an index relative abundance, it was estimated that more that 60% of dugongs were more than 20 km from the coast at the time of the survey. 13% of the dugongs sighted were calves. A number of factors which could improve the accuracy and precision of dugong surveys have been examined. It was estimated that a minimum of 4906 ± 741 turtles were in the area at the time of the survey. No courting turtles were seen. Incidental sightings of rays, sea snakes, sharks, seagrass beds, Trichodesmium, and coral spawn have also been reported.</p>", "<p>In November 1984, the waters of the Great Barrier Reef lagoon between Cape Bedford and Cape Melville were surveyed for dugongs. The inshore waters less than 21.5 km from the coast were surveyed at an intensity of about 13%, the offshore waters at an intensity of 4.7%. The survey returned a minimum estimate of 1105 ± 232 (S.E) dugongs for the area based on total counts. It is not possible to convert this minimum estimate into an absolute population estimate for the region because the number of dugongs sighted under aerial survey conditions has not been calibrated. However, preliminary experimental work indicates that even trained observers miss a significant proportion of dugongs visible on the transect line. In view of the large proportion of dugongs that are likely to be invisible below the water surface, it is obvious that these figures must considerably underestimate the number of dugongs actually present. Dugongs (including calves) were sighted up to 55 km from the coast, and using surfaces sightings as an index relative abundance, it was estimated that more that 60% of dugongs were more than 20 km from the coast at the time of the survey. 13% of the dugongs sighted were calves. A number of factors which could improve the accuracy and precision of dugong surveys have been examined. It was estimated that a minimum of 4906 ± 741 turtles were in the area at the time of the survey. No courting turtles were seen. Incidental sightings of rays, sea snakes, sharks, seagrass beds, Trichodesmium, and coral spawn have also been reported.</p>", "<p>Funding for these surveys was obtained from the following government agencies: - Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority (GBRMPA), - Department of Environment and Resource Management (DERM), - Australian Marine Mammal Centre (AMMC), - Torres Strait Regional Authority (TSRA), - Australian Fisheries Management Authority (AFMA), - Marine and Tropical Sciences Research Facility (MTSRF), - National Environmental Research Program (NERP). GIS data can be obtained by contacting Helene Marsh Helene.Marsh@jcu.edu.au</p>", "<p>Funding for these surveys was obtained from the following government agencies: - Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority (GBRMPA), - Department of Environment and Resource Management (DERM), - Australian Marine Mammal Centre (AMMC), - Torres Strait Regional Authority (TSRA), - Australian Fisheries Management Authority (AFMA), - Marine and Tropical Sciences Research Facility (MTSRF), - National Environmental Research Program (NERP). GIS data can be obtained by contacting Helene Marsh Helene.Marsh@jcu.edu.au</p>", ""] Dugong aerial survey (cetacean, dugong and turtle) Northern Great Barrier Reef, 1985 April to November fascinator a460965e76fb6a8c01cbbe58f3ca0fd9 2019-03-15T12:56:49Z ["brief", "note", "full", "<p>Sighting for dugong, cetacean and turtle species in the Northern Great Barrier Reef area during the dugong aerials surveys in April 1985.</p>", "<p>Sighting for dugong, cetacean and turtle species in the Northern Great Barrier Reef area during the dugong aerials surveys in April 1985.</p>", "<p>GIS data can be obtained by contacting Helene Marsh Helene.Marsh@jcu.edu.au Funding for these surveys was obtained from the following government agencies: - Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority (GBRMPA), - Department of Environment and Resource Management (DERM), - Australian Marine Mammal Centre (AMMC), - Torres Strait Regional Authority (TSRA), - Australian Fisheries Management Authority (AFMA), - Marine and Tropical Sciences Research Facility (MTSRF), - National Environmental Research Program (NERP).</p>", "<p>GIS data can be obtained by contacting Helene Marsh Helene.Marsh@jcu.edu.au Funding for these surveys was obtained from the following government agencies: - Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority (GBRMPA), - Department of Environment and Resource Management (DERM), - Australian Marine Mammal Centre (AMMC), - Torres Strait Regional Authority (TSRA), - Australian Fisheries Management Authority (AFMA), - Marine and Tropical Sciences Research Facility (MTSRF), - National Environmental Research Program (NERP).</p>", ""] ["brief", "note", "full", "<p>Sighting for dugong, cetacean and turtle species in the Northern Great Barrier Reef area during the dugong aerials surveys in April 1985.</p>", "<p>Sighting for dugong, cetacean and turtle species in the Northern Great Barrier Reef area during the dugong aerials surveys in April 1985.</p>", "<p>GIS data can be obtained by contacting Helene Marsh Helene.Marsh@jcu.edu.au Funding for these surveys was obtained from the following government agencies: - Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority (GBRMPA), - Department of Environment and Resource Management (DERM), - Australian Marine Mammal Centre (AMMC), - Torres Strait Regional Authority (TSRA), - Australian Fisheries Management Authority (AFMA), - Marine and Tropical Sciences Research Facility (MTSRF), - National Environmental Research Program (NERP).</p>", "<p>GIS data can be obtained by contacting Helene Marsh Helene.Marsh@jcu.edu.au Funding for these surveys was obtained from the following government agencies: - Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority (GBRMPA), - Department of Environment and Resource Management (DERM), - Australian Marine Mammal Centre (AMMC), - Torres Strait Regional Authority (TSRA), - Australian Fisheries Management Authority (AFMA), - Marine and Tropical Sciences Research Facility (MTSRF), - National Environmental Research Program (NERP).</p>", ""] Dugong aerial survey (cetacean, dugong and turtle) Northern Great Barrier Reef, 1990 November to December fascinator 2928c88285f2066c92aa80ca3ebe7d84 2019-03-15T12:58:16Z ["brief", "full", "note", "full", "<p>Sighting for dugongs, cetaceans and turtles in the Northern Great Barrier Reef area during the dugong aerials surveys between November and December 1990.</p>", "<p>Sighting for dugongs, cetaceans and turtles in the Northern Great Barrier Reef area during the dugong aerials surveys between November and December 1990.</p>", "<p>In November-December 1990, dugongs, sea turtles and cetaceans were counted from the air at an overall sampling intensity of 9% over a total area of 31288 km2 in the Great Barrier Reef region north of Cooktown. This survey was a repetition of the surveys conducted in 1984 and 1985. The population estimates for dugongs and sea turtles were corrected for perception bias (the proportion of animals visible in the transect which are missed by observers), and standardised for availability bias (the proportion of animals that are invisible due to water turbidity) with survey and species-specific correction factors. The estimates for cetaceans were corrected for perception bias only. The minimum population estimate for dugongs for the survey area in November-December 1990 (10471± s.e. 1578 dugongs), was not significantly different from the estimate for the same region in November 1985 using the same aerial survey technique (8110 ± s.e. 1073). The results of the two surveys for each survey block were remarkably consistent suggesting that the dugong population in the region is stable. However, the technique is not capable of detecting local declines in abundance unless they were considerable. Most of the turtles sighted during this survey were probably large green turtles. The population estimate for the northern Great Barrier Reef region in November-December 1990 was 45644 ± s.e. 3501 turtles compared with 32187 ± 2532 for the same region in November 1985. This difference between surveys was not significant when sighting conditions were taken into account. However, the agreement between the 1985 and 1990 surveys was not nearly as good for turtles as for dugongs, probably due to: (1) the sensitivity of turtle sightings to small changes in sighting conditions which cannot be completely removed in the analyses and (2) the tendency of turtles to migrate to breed coincident with the timing of the surveys. All the cetaceans sighted were dolphins. Most of the animals appeared to be bottlenose dolphins, Tursiops truncates, or Indo-Pacific humpback dolphins, Sousa chinensis. The population estimates for November-December 1990 sum to 4875 ± s.e. 500 dolphins for the whole region compared with 6609 ± 667 in November 1985. The difference in dolphin distribution was significantly different between the two surveys.</p>", "<p>In November-December 1990, dugongs, sea turtles and cetaceans were counted from the air at an overall sampling intensity of 9% over a total area of 31288 km2 in the Great Barrier Reef region north of Cooktown. This survey was a repetition of the surveys conducted in 1984 and 1985. The population estimates for dugongs and sea turtles were corrected for perception bias (the proportion of animals visible in the transect which are missed by observers), and standardised for availability bias (the proportion of animals that are invisible due to water turbidity) with survey and species-specific correction factors. The estimates for cetaceans were corrected for perception bias only. The minimum population estimate for dugongs for the survey area in November-December 1990 (10471± s.e. 1578 dugongs), was not significantly different from the estimate for the same region in November 1985 using the same aerial survey technique (8110 ± s.e. 1073). The results of the two surveys for each survey block were remarkably consistent suggesting that the dugong population in the region is stable. However, the technique is not capable of detecting local declines in abundance unless they were considerable. Most of the turtles sighted during this survey were probably large green turtles. The population estimate for the northern Great Barrier Reef region in November-December 1990 was 45644 ± s.e. 3501 turtles compared with 32187 ± 2532 for the same region in November 1985. This difference between surveys was not significant when sighting conditions were taken into account. However, the agreement between the 1985 and 1990 surveys was not nearly as good for turtles as for dugongs, probably due to: (1) the sensitivity of turtle sightings to small changes in sighting conditions which cannot be completely removed in the analyses and (2) the tendency of turtles to migrate to breed coincident with the timing of the surveys. All the cetaceans sighted were dolphins. Most of the animals appeared to be bottlenose dolphins, Tursiops truncates, or Indo-Pacific humpback dolphins, Sousa chinensis. The population estimates for November-December 1990 sum to 4875 ± s.e. 500 dolphins for the whole region compared with 6609 ± 667 in November 1985. The difference in dolphin distribution was significantly different between the two surveys.</p>", "<p>Contact Helene Marsh Helene.Marsh@jcu.edu.au for access to GIS data. Funding for these surveys was obtained from the following government agencies: - Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority (GBRMPA), - Department of Environment and Resource Management (DERM), - Australian Marine Mammal Centre (AMMC), - Torres Strait Regional Authority (TSRA), - Australian Fisheries Management Authority (AFMA), - Marine and Tropical Sciences Research Facility (MTSRF), - National Environmental Research Program (NERP).</p>", "<p>Contact Helene Marsh Helene.Marsh@jcu.edu.au for access to GIS data. Funding for these surveys was obtained from the following government agencies: - Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority (GBRMPA), - Department of Environment and Resource Management (DERM), - Australian Marine Mammal Centre (AMMC), - Torres Strait Regional Authority (TSRA), - Australian Fisheries Management Authority (AFMA), - Marine and Tropical Sciences Research Facility (MTSRF), - National Environmental Research Program (NERP).</p>", ""] ["brief", "full", "note", "full", "<p>Sighting for dugongs, cetaceans and turtles in the Northern Great Barrier Reef area during the dugong aerials surveys between November and December 1990.</p>", "<p>Sighting for dugongs, cetaceans and turtles in the Northern Great Barrier Reef area during the dugong aerials surveys between November and December 1990.</p>", "<p>In November-December 1990, dugongs, sea turtles and cetaceans were counted from the air at an overall sampling intensity of 9% over a total area of 31288 km2 in the Great Barrier Reef region north of Cooktown. This survey was a repetition of the surveys conducted in 1984 and 1985. The population estimates for dugongs and sea turtles were corrected for perception bias (the proportion of animals visible in the transect which are missed by observers), and standardised for availability bias (the proportion of animals that are invisible due to water turbidity) with survey and species-specific correction factors. The estimates for cetaceans were corrected for perception bias only. The minimum population estimate for dugongs for the survey area in November-December 1990 (10471± s.e. 1578 dugongs), was not significantly different from the estimate for the same region in November 1985 using the same aerial survey technique (8110 ± s.e. 1073). The results of the two surveys for each survey block were remarkably consistent suggesting that the dugong population in the region is stable. However, the technique is not capable of detecting local declines in abundance unless they were considerable. Most of the turtles sighted during this survey were probably large green turtles. The population estimate for the northern Great Barrier Reef region in November-December 1990 was 45644 ± s.e. 3501 turtles compared with 32187 ± 2532 for the same region in November 1985. This difference between surveys was not significant when sighting conditions were taken into account. However, the agreement between the 1985 and 1990 surveys was not nearly as good for turtles as for dugongs, probably due to: (1) the sensitivity of turtle sightings to small changes in sighting conditions which cannot be completely removed in the analyses and (2) the tendency of turtles to migrate to breed coincident with the timing of the surveys. All the cetaceans sighted were dolphins. Most of the animals appeared to be bottlenose dolphins, Tursiops truncates, or Indo-Pacific humpback dolphins, Sousa chinensis. The population estimates for November-December 1990 sum to 4875 ± s.e. 500 dolphins for the whole region compared with 6609 ± 667 in November 1985. The difference in dolphin distribution was significantly different between the two surveys.</p>", "<p>In November-December 1990, dugongs, sea turtles and cetaceans were counted from the air at an overall sampling intensity of 9% over a total area of 31288 km2 in the Great Barrier Reef region north of Cooktown. This survey was a repetition of the surveys conducted in 1984 and 1985. The population estimates for dugongs and sea turtles were corrected for perception bias (the proportion of animals visible in the transect which are missed by observers), and standardised for availability bias (the proportion of animals that are invisible due to water turbidity) with survey and species-specific correction factors. The estimates for cetaceans were corrected for perception bias only. The minimum population estimate for dugongs for the survey area in November-December 1990 (10471± s.e. 1578 dugongs), was not significantly different from the estimate for the same region in November 1985 using the same aerial survey technique (8110 ± s.e. 1073). The results of the two surveys for each survey block were remarkably consistent suggesting that the dugong population in the region is stable. However, the technique is not capable of detecting local declines in abundance unless they were considerable. Most of the turtles sighted during this survey were probably large green turtles. The population estimate for the northern Great Barrier Reef region in November-December 1990 was 45644 ± s.e. 3501 turtles compared with 32187 ± 2532 for the same region in November 1985. This difference between surveys was not significant when sighting conditions were taken into account. However, the agreement between the 1985 and 1990 surveys was not nearly as good for turtles as for dugongs, probably due to: (1) the sensitivity of turtle sightings to small changes in sighting conditions which cannot be completely removed in the analyses and (2) the tendency of turtles to migrate to breed coincident with the timing of the surveys. All the cetaceans sighted were dolphins. Most of the animals appeared to be bottlenose dolphins, Tursiops truncates, or Indo-Pacific humpback dolphins, Sousa chinensis. The population estimates for November-December 1990 sum to 4875 ± s.e. 500 dolphins for the whole region compared with 6609 ± 667 in November 1985. The difference in dolphin distribution was significantly different between the two surveys.</p>", "<p>Contact Helene Marsh Helene.Marsh@jcu.edu.au for access to GIS data. Funding for these surveys was obtained from the following government agencies: - Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority (GBRMPA), - Department of Environment and Resource Management (DERM), - Australian Marine Mammal Centre (AMMC), - Torres Strait Regional Authority (TSRA), - Australian Fisheries Management Authority (AFMA), - Marine and Tropical Sciences Research Facility (MTSRF), - National Environmental Research Program (NERP).</p>", "<p>Contact Helene Marsh Helene.Marsh@jcu.edu.au for access to GIS data. Funding for these surveys was obtained from the following government agencies: - Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority (GBRMPA), - Department of Environment and Resource Management (DERM), - Australian Marine Mammal Centre (AMMC), - Torres Strait Regional Authority (TSRA), - Australian Fisheries Management Authority (AFMA), - Marine and Tropical Sciences Research Facility (MTSRF), - National Environmental Research Program (NERP).</p>", ""] Dugong aerial survey (cetacean, dugong, turtle) Exmouth and Ningaloo Reef, 1989 fascinator 2c72516b161d067242291947428b6f51 2019-03-15T12:54:56Z ["brief", "full", "note", "note", "full", "full", "<p>Sighting for dugongs, cetacean and marine turtle in Exmouth and Ningaloo Reef area during the dugong aerials surveys in 1989.</p>", "<p>Sighting for dugongs, cetacean and marine turtle in Exmouth and Ningaloo Reef area during the dugong aerials surveys in 1989.</p>", "<p>Strip-transect aerial surveys of Shark Bay, Ningaloo Reef and Exmouth Gulf were conducted during the winters of 1989 and 1994. These surveys were designed primarily to estimate the abundance and distribution of dugongs, although they also allowed sea turtles and dolphins, and, to a lesser extent, whales, manta rays and whale sharks to be surveyed. Shark Bay contains a large population of dugongs that is of international significance. Estimates of approximately 10000 dugongs resulted from both surveys. The density of dugongs is the highest recorded in Australia and the Middle East, where these surveys have been conducted. Exmouth Gulf and Ningaloo Reef are also important dugong habitats, each supporting in the order of 1000 dugongs. The estimated number of turtles in Shark Bay is comparable to the number in Exmouth Gulf plus Ningaloo Reef (7000-9000). The density of turtles in Ningaloo Reef and, to a lesser extent, Exmouth Gulf is exceptionally high compared with most other areas that have been surveyed by the same technique. Shark Bay supports a substantial population of bottlenose dolphins (2000-3000 minimum estimate). Exmouth Gulf and Ningaloo Reef were not significant habitats for dolphins during the winter surveys. Substantial numbers of whales (primarily humpbacks) and manta rays occur in northern and western Shark Bay in winter. Ningaloo Reef is an important area for whale sharks and manta rays in autumn and winter. The Shark Bay Marine Park excludes much of the winter habitats of the large vertebrate fauna of Shark Bay. In 1989 and 1994, more than half of all the dugongs were seen outside the Marine Park (57.4 and 50.7%, respectively). Approximately one-third to one-half of turtles and dolphins were seen outside the Marine Park (in 1989 and 1994 respectively: turtles, 43 and 27%; dolphins, 47 and 32%). Almost all the whales and most of the manta rays were seen outside the Marine Park. Expansion of the Shark Bay Marine Park, to bring it into alignment with the marine section of the Shark Bay World Heritage Area, would facilitate the appropriate management of these populations. This would also simplify the State-Commonwealth collaboration necessary to meet the obligations of World Heritage listing. The coastal waters of Western Australia north of the surveyed area (over 6000 km of coastline) are relatively poorly known and surveys of their marine megafauna are required for wise planning and management.</p>", "<p>Strip-transect aerial surveys of Shark Bay, Ningaloo Reef and Exmouth Gulf were conducted during the winters of 1989 and 1994. These surveys were designed primarily to estimate the abundance and distribution of dugongs, although they also allowed sea turtles and dolphins, and, to a lesser extent, whales, manta rays and whale sharks to be surveyed. Shark Bay contains a large population of dugongs that is of international significance. Estimates of approximately 10000 dugongs resulted from both surveys. The density of dugongs is the highest recorded in Australia and the Middle East, where these surveys have been conducted. Exmouth Gulf and Ningaloo Reef are also important dugong habitats, each supporting in the order of 1000 dugongs. The estimated number of turtles in Shark Bay is comparable to the number in Exmouth Gulf plus Ningaloo Reef (7000-9000). The density of turtles in Ningaloo Reef and, to a lesser extent, Exmouth Gulf is exceptionally high compared with most other areas that have been surveyed by the same technique. Shark Bay supports a substantial population of bottlenose dolphins (2000-3000 minimum estimate). Exmouth Gulf and Ningaloo Reef were not significant habitats for dolphins during the winter surveys. Substantial numbers of whales (primarily humpbacks) and manta rays occur in northern and western Shark Bay in winter. Ningaloo Reef is an important area for whale sharks and manta rays in autumn and winter. The Shark Bay Marine Park excludes much of the winter habitats of the large vertebrate fauna of Shark Bay. In 1989 and 1994, more than half of all the dugongs were seen outside the Marine Park (57.4 and 50.7%, respectively). Approximately one-third to one-half of turtles and dolphins were seen outside the Marine Park (in 1989 and 1994 respectively: turtles, 43 and 27%; dolphins, 47 and 32%). Almost all the whales and most of the manta rays were seen outside the Marine Park. Expansion of the Shark Bay Marine Park, to bring it into alignment with the marine section of the Shark Bay World Heritage Area, would facilitate the appropriate management of these populations. This would also simplify the State-Commonwealth collaboration necessary to meet the obligations of World Heritage listing. The coastal waters of Western Australia north of the surveyed area (over 6000 km of coastline) are relatively poorly known and surveys of their marine megafauna are required for wise planning and management.</p>", "<p>Funding for these surveys was obtained from the following government agencies: - Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority (GBRMPA), - Department of Environment and Resource Management (DERM), - Australian Marine Mammal Centre (AMMC), - Torres Strait Regional Authority (TSRA), - Australian Fisheries Management Authority (AFMA), - Marine and Tropical Sciences Research Facility (MTSRF), - National Environmental Research Program (NERP).</p>", "<p>Funding for these surveys was obtained from the following government agencies: - Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority (GBRMPA), - Department of Environment and Resource Management (DERM), - Australian Marine Mammal Centre (AMMC), - Torres Strait Regional Authority (TSRA), - Australian Fisheries Management Authority (AFMA), - Marine and Tropical Sciences Research Facility (MTSRF), - National Environmental Research Program (NERP).</p>", "<p>This dataset consists of transect maps (jpg), additional metadata (pdf) and a report (pdf). Please contact Helene Marsh Helene.Marsh@jcu.edu.au for GIS data.</p>", "<p>This dataset consists of transect maps (jpg), additional metadata (pdf) and a report (pdf). Please contact Helene Marsh Helene.Marsh@jcu.edu.au for GIS data.</p>", ""] ["brief", "full", "note", "note", "full", "full", "<p>Sighting for dugongs, cetacean and marine turtle in Exmouth and Ningaloo Reef area during the dugong aerials surveys in 1989.</p>", "<p>Sighting for dugongs, cetacean and marine turtle in Exmouth and Ningaloo Reef area during the dugong aerials surveys in 1989.</p>", "<p>Strip-transect aerial surveys of Shark Bay, Ningaloo Reef and Exmouth Gulf were conducted during the winters of 1989 and 1994. These surveys were designed primarily to estimate the abundance and distribution of dugongs, although they also allowed sea turtles and dolphins, and, to a lesser extent, whales, manta rays and whale sharks to be surveyed. Shark Bay contains a large population of dugongs that is of international significance. Estimates of approximately 10000 dugongs resulted from both surveys. The density of dugongs is the highest recorded in Australia and the Middle East, where these surveys have been conducted. Exmouth Gulf and Ningaloo Reef are also important dugong habitats, each supporting in the order of 1000 dugongs. The estimated number of turtles in Shark Bay is comparable to the number in Exmouth Gulf plus Ningaloo Reef (7000-9000). The density of turtles in Ningaloo Reef and, to a lesser extent, Exmouth Gulf is exceptionally high compared with most other areas that have been surveyed by the same technique. Shark Bay supports a substantial population of bottlenose dolphins (2000-3000 minimum estimate). Exmouth Gulf and Ningaloo Reef were not significant habitats for dolphins during the winter surveys. Substantial numbers of whales (primarily humpbacks) and manta rays occur in northern and western Shark Bay in winter. Ningaloo Reef is an important area for whale sharks and manta rays in autumn and winter. The Shark Bay Marine Park excludes much of the winter habitats of the large vertebrate fauna of Shark Bay. In 1989 and 1994, more than half of all the dugongs were seen outside the Marine Park (57.4 and 50.7%, respectively). Approximately one-third to one-half of turtles and dolphins were seen outside the Marine Park (in 1989 and 1994 respectively: turtles, 43 and 27%; dolphins, 47 and 32%). Almost all the whales and most of the manta rays were seen outside the Marine Park. Expansion of the Shark Bay Marine Park, to bring it into alignment with the marine section of the Shark Bay World Heritage Area, would facilitate the appropriate management of these populations. This would also simplify the State-Commonwealth collaboration necessary to meet the obligations of World Heritage listing. The coastal waters of Western Australia north of the surveyed area (over 6000 km of coastline) are relatively poorly known and surveys of their marine megafauna are required for wise planning and management.</p>", "<p>Strip-transect aerial surveys of Shark Bay, Ningaloo Reef and Exmouth Gulf were conducted during the winters of 1989 and 1994. These surveys were designed primarily to estimate the abundance and distribution of dugongs, although they also allowed sea turtles and dolphins, and, to a lesser extent, whales, manta rays and whale sharks to be surveyed. Shark Bay contains a large population of dugongs that is of international significance. Estimates of approximately 10000 dugongs resulted from both surveys. The density of dugongs is the highest recorded in Australia and the Middle East, where these surveys have been conducted. Exmouth Gulf and Ningaloo Reef are also important dugong habitats, each supporting in the order of 1000 dugongs. The estimated number of turtles in Shark Bay is comparable to the number in Exmouth Gulf plus Ningaloo Reef (7000-9000). The density of turtles in Ningaloo Reef and, to a lesser extent, Exmouth Gulf is exceptionally high compared with most other areas that have been surveyed by the same technique. Shark Bay supports a substantial population of bottlenose dolphins (2000-3000 minimum estimate). Exmouth Gulf and Ningaloo Reef were not significant habitats for dolphins during the winter surveys. Substantial numbers of whales (primarily humpbacks) and manta rays occur in northern and western Shark Bay in winter. Ningaloo Reef is an important area for whale sharks and manta rays in autumn and winter. The Shark Bay Marine Park excludes much of the winter habitats of the large vertebrate fauna of Shark Bay. In 1989 and 1994, more than half of all the dugongs were seen outside the Marine Park (57.4 and 50.7%, respectively). Approximately one-third to one-half of turtles and dolphins were seen outside the Marine Park (in 1989 and 1994 respectively: turtles, 43 and 27%; dolphins, 47 and 32%). Almost all the whales and most of the manta rays were seen outside the Marine Park. Expansion of the Shark Bay Marine Park, to bring it into alignment with the marine section of the Shark Bay World Heritage Area, would facilitate the appropriate management of these populations. This would also simplify the State-Commonwealth collaboration necessary to meet the obligations of World Heritage listing. The coastal waters of Western Australia north of the surveyed area (over 6000 km of coastline) are relatively poorly known and surveys of their marine megafauna are required for wise planning and management.</p>", "<p>Funding for these surveys was obtained from the following government agencies: - Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority (GBRMPA), - Department of Environment and Resource Management (DERM), - Australian Marine Mammal Centre (AMMC), - Torres Strait Regional Authority (TSRA), - Australian Fisheries Management Authority (AFMA), - Marine and Tropical Sciences Research Facility (MTSRF), - National Environmental Research Program (NERP).</p>", "<p>Funding for these surveys was obtained from the following government agencies: - Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority (GBRMPA), - Department of Environment and Resource Management (DERM), - Australian Marine Mammal Centre (AMMC), - Torres Strait Regional Authority (TSRA), - Australian Fisheries Management Authority (AFMA), - Marine and Tropical Sciences Research Facility (MTSRF), - National Environmental Research Program (NERP).</p>", "<p>This dataset consists of transect maps (jpg), additional metadata (pdf) and a report (pdf). Please contact Helene Marsh Helene.Marsh@jcu.edu.au for GIS data.</p>", "<p>This dataset consists of transect maps (jpg), additional metadata (pdf) and a report (pdf). Please contact Helene Marsh Helene.Marsh@jcu.edu.au for GIS data.</p>", ""] Dugong aerial survey (cetacean, dugong, turtle) Exmouth and Ningaloo Reef, 2000 fascinator 23f3c09e240cc363833c6c89434afebb 2019-03-15T12:57:51Z ["brief", "full", "note", "note", "full", "full", "<p>Sightings for dugongs, cetaceans and marine turtles in the Exmouth and Ningaloo Reef area during the dugong aerial surveys in 2000.</p>", "<p>Sightings for dugongs, cetaceans and marine turtles in the Exmouth and Ningaloo Reef area during the dugong aerial surveys in 2000.</p>", "<p>Strip-transect aerial surveys of Shark Bay, Ningaloo Reef and Exmouth Gulf were conducted during the winters of 1989 and 1994. These surveys were designed primarily to estimate the abundance and distribution of dugongs, although they also allowed sea turtles and dolphins, and, to a lesser extent, whales, manta rays and whale sharks to be surveyed. Shark Bay contains a large population of dugongs that is of international significance. Estimates of approximately 10000 dugongs resulted from both surveys. The density of dugongs is the highest recorded in Australia and the Middle East, where these surveys have been conducted. Exmouth Gulf and Ningaloo Reef are also important dugong habitats, each supporting in the order of 1000 dugongs. The estimated number of turtles in Shark Bay is comparable to the number in Exmouth Gulf plus Ningaloo Reef (7000-9000). The density of turtles in Ningaloo Reef and, to a lesser extent, Exmouth Gulf is exceptionally high compared with most other areas that have been surveyed by the same technique. Shark Bay supports a substantial population of bottlenose dolphins (2000-3000 minimum estimate). Exmouth Gulf and Ningaloo Reef were not significant habitats for dolphins during the winter surveys. Substantial numbers of whales (primarily humpbacks) and manta rays occur in northern and western Shark Bay in winter. Ningaloo Reef is an important area for whale sharks and manta rays in autumn and winter. The Shark Bay Marine Park excludes much of the winter habitats of the large vertebrate fauna of Shark Bay. In 1989 and 1994, more than half of all the dugongs were seen outside the Marine Park (57.4 and 50.7%, respectively). Approximately one-third to one-half of turtles and dolphins were seen outside the Marine Park (in 1989 and 1994 respectively: turtles, 43 and 27%; dolphins, 47 and 32%). Almost all the whales and most of the manta rays were seen outside the Marine Park. Expansion of the Shark Bay Marine Park, to bring it into alignment with the marine section of the Shark Bay World Heritage Area, would facilitate the appropriate management of these populations. This would also simplify the State-Commonwealth collaboration necessary to meet the obligations of World Heritage listing. The coastal waters of Western Australia north of the surveyed area (over 6000 km of coastline) are relatively poorly known and surveys of their marine megafauna are required for wise planning and management.</p>", "<p>Strip-transect aerial surveys of Shark Bay, Ningaloo Reef and Exmouth Gulf were conducted during the winters of 1989 and 1994. These surveys were designed primarily to estimate the abundance and distribution of dugongs, although they also allowed sea turtles and dolphins, and, to a lesser extent, whales, manta rays and whale sharks to be surveyed. Shark Bay contains a large population of dugongs that is of international significance. Estimates of approximately 10000 dugongs resulted from both surveys. The density of dugongs is the highest recorded in Australia and the Middle East, where these surveys have been conducted. Exmouth Gulf and Ningaloo Reef are also important dugong habitats, each supporting in the order of 1000 dugongs. The estimated number of turtles in Shark Bay is comparable to the number in Exmouth Gulf plus Ningaloo Reef (7000-9000). The density of turtles in Ningaloo Reef and, to a lesser extent, Exmouth Gulf is exceptionally high compared with most other areas that have been surveyed by the same technique. Shark Bay supports a substantial population of bottlenose dolphins (2000-3000 minimum estimate). Exmouth Gulf and Ningaloo Reef were not significant habitats for dolphins during the winter surveys. Substantial numbers of whales (primarily humpbacks) and manta rays occur in northern and western Shark Bay in winter. Ningaloo Reef is an important area for whale sharks and manta rays in autumn and winter. The Shark Bay Marine Park excludes much of the winter habitats of the large vertebrate fauna of Shark Bay. In 1989 and 1994, more than half of all the dugongs were seen outside the Marine Park (57.4 and 50.7%, respectively). Approximately one-third to one-half of turtles and dolphins were seen outside the Marine Park (in 1989 and 1994 respectively: turtles, 43 and 27%; dolphins, 47 and 32%). Almost all the whales and most of the manta rays were seen outside the Marine Park. Expansion of the Shark Bay Marine Park, to bring it into alignment with the marine section of the Shark Bay World Heritage Area, would facilitate the appropriate management of these populations. This would also simplify the State-Commonwealth collaboration necessary to meet the obligations of World Heritage listing. The coastal waters of Western Australia north of the surveyed area (over 6000 km of coastline) are relatively poorly known and surveys of their marine megafauna are required for wise planning and management.</p>", "<p>Funding for these surveys was obtained from the following government agencies: - Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority (GBRMPA), - Department of Environment and Resource Management (DERM), - Australian Marine Mammal Centre (AMMC), - Torres Strait Regional Authority (TSRA), - Australian Fisheries Management Authority (AFMA), - Marine and Tropical Sciences Research Facility (MTSRF), - National Environmental Research Program (NERP).</p>", "<p>Funding for these surveys was obtained from the following government agencies: - Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority (GBRMPA), - Department of Environment and Resource Management (DERM), - Australian Marine Mammal Centre (AMMC), - Torres Strait Regional Authority (TSRA), - Australian Fisheries Management Authority (AFMA), - Marine and Tropical Sciences Research Facility (MTSRF), - National Environmental Research Program (NERP).</p>", "<p>This dataset consists of transect maps (jpg) and additional metadata (pdf). Please contact Helene Marsh Helene.Marsh@jcu.edu.au for GIS data.</p>", "<p>This dataset consists of transect maps (jpg) and additional metadata (pdf). Please contact Helene Marsh Helene.Marsh@jcu.edu.au for GIS data.</p>", ""] ["brief", "full", "note", "note", "full", "full", "<p>Sightings for dugongs, cetaceans and marine turtles in the Exmouth and Ningaloo Reef area during the dugong aerial surveys in 2000.</p>", "<p>Sightings for dugongs, cetaceans and marine turtles in the Exmouth and Ningaloo Reef area during the dugong aerial surveys in 2000.</p>", "<p>Strip-transect aerial surveys of Shark Bay, Ningaloo Reef and Exmouth Gulf were conducted during the winters of 1989 and 1994. These surveys were designed primarily to estimate the abundance and distribution of dugongs, although they also allowed sea turtles and dolphins, and, to a lesser extent, whales, manta rays and whale sharks to be surveyed. Shark Bay contains a large population of dugongs that is of international significance. Estimates of approximately 10000 dugongs resulted from both surveys. The density of dugongs is the highest recorded in Australia and the Middle East, where these surveys have been conducted. Exmouth Gulf and Ningaloo Reef are also important dugong habitats, each supporting in the order of 1000 dugongs. The estimated number of turtles in Shark Bay is comparable to the number in Exmouth Gulf plus Ningaloo Reef (7000-9000). The density of turtles in Ningaloo Reef and, to a lesser extent, Exmouth Gulf is exceptionally high compared with most other areas that have been surveyed by the same technique. Shark Bay supports a substantial population of bottlenose dolphins (2000-3000 minimum estimate). Exmouth Gulf and Ningaloo Reef were not significant habitats for dolphins during the winter surveys. Substantial numbers of whales (primarily humpbacks) and manta rays occur in northern and western Shark Bay in winter. Ningaloo Reef is an important area for whale sharks and manta rays in autumn and winter. The Shark Bay Marine Park excludes much of the winter habitats of the large vertebrate fauna of Shark Bay. In 1989 and 1994, more than half of all the dugongs were seen outside the Marine Park (57.4 and 50.7%, respectively). Approximately one-third to one-half of turtles and dolphins were seen outside the Marine Park (in 1989 and 1994 respectively: turtles, 43 and 27%; dolphins, 47 and 32%). Almost all the whales and most of the manta rays were seen outside the Marine Park. Expansion of the Shark Bay Marine Park, to bring it into alignment with the marine section of the Shark Bay World Heritage Area, would facilitate the appropriate management of these populations. This would also simplify the State-Commonwealth collaboration necessary to meet the obligations of World Heritage listing. The coastal waters of Western Australia north of the surveyed area (over 6000 km of coastline) are relatively poorly known and surveys of their marine megafauna are required for wise planning and management.</p>", "<p>Strip-transect aerial surveys of Shark Bay, Ningaloo Reef and Exmouth Gulf were conducted during the winters of 1989 and 1994. These surveys were designed primarily to estimate the abundance and distribution of dugongs, although they also allowed sea turtles and dolphins, and, to a lesser extent, whales, manta rays and whale sharks to be surveyed. Shark Bay contains a large population of dugongs that is of international significance. Estimates of approximately 10000 dugongs resulted from both surveys. The density of dugongs is the highest recorded in Australia and the Middle East, where these surveys have been conducted. Exmouth Gulf and Ningaloo Reef are also important dugong habitats, each supporting in the order of 1000 dugongs. The estimated number of turtles in Shark Bay is comparable to the number in Exmouth Gulf plus Ningaloo Reef (7000-9000). The density of turtles in Ningaloo Reef and, to a lesser extent, Exmouth Gulf is exceptionally high compared with most other areas that have been surveyed by the same technique. Shark Bay supports a substantial population of bottlenose dolphins (2000-3000 minimum estimate). Exmouth Gulf and Ningaloo Reef were not significant habitats for dolphins during the winter surveys. Substantial numbers of whales (primarily humpbacks) and manta rays occur in northern and western Shark Bay in winter. Ningaloo Reef is an important area for whale sharks and manta rays in autumn and winter. The Shark Bay Marine Park excludes much of the winter habitats of the large vertebrate fauna of Shark Bay. In 1989 and 1994, more than half of all the dugongs were seen outside the Marine Park (57.4 and 50.7%, respectively). Approximately one-third to one-half of turtles and dolphins were seen outside the Marine Park (in 1989 and 1994 respectively: turtles, 43 and 27%; dolphins, 47 and 32%). Almost all the whales and most of the manta rays were seen outside the Marine Park. Expansion of the Shark Bay Marine Park, to bring it into alignment with the marine section of the Shark Bay World Heritage Area, would facilitate the appropriate management of these populations. This would also simplify the State-Commonwealth collaboration necessary to meet the obligations of World Heritage listing. The coastal waters of Western Australia north of the surveyed area (over 6000 km of coastline) are relatively poorly known and surveys of their marine megafauna are required for wise planning and management.</p>", "<p>Funding for these surveys was obtained from the following government agencies: - Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority (GBRMPA), - Department of Environment and Resource Management (DERM), - Australian Marine Mammal Centre (AMMC), - Torres Strait Regional Authority (TSRA), - Australian Fisheries Management Authority (AFMA), - Marine and Tropical Sciences Research Facility (MTSRF), - National Environmental Research Program (NERP).</p>", "<p>Funding for these surveys was obtained from the following government agencies: - Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority (GBRMPA), - Department of Environment and Resource Management (DERM), - Australian Marine Mammal Centre (AMMC), - Torres Strait Regional Authority (TSRA), - Australian Fisheries Management Authority (AFMA), - Marine and Tropical Sciences Research Facility (MTSRF), - National Environmental Research Program (NERP).</p>", "<p>This dataset consists of transect maps (jpg) and additional metadata (pdf). Please contact Helene Marsh Helene.Marsh@jcu.edu.au for GIS data.</p>", "<p>This dataset consists of transect maps (jpg) and additional metadata (pdf). Please contact Helene Marsh Helene.Marsh@jcu.edu.au for GIS data.</p>", ""] Dugong aerial survey (cetacean, dugong, turtle) Pilbara, 2000 fascinator 73c11c33f5b2d5d7646914008235aea9 2019-03-15T12:57:19Z ["brief", "note", "note", "full", "full", "<p>Sightings for dugongs, cetaceans and turtles in the Pilbara area during the dugong aerial surveys in 2000.</p>", "<p>Sightings for dugongs, cetaceans and turtles in the Pilbara area during the dugong aerial surveys in 2000.</p>", "<p>Funding for these surveys was obtained from the following government agencies: - Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority (GBRMPA), - Department of Environment and Resource Management (DERM), - Australian Marine Mammal Centre (AMMC), - Torres Strait Regional Authority (TSRA), - Australian Fisheries Management Authority (AFMA), - Marine and Tropical Sciences Research Facility (MTSRF), - National Environmental Research Program (NERP).</p>", "<p>Funding for these surveys was obtained from the following government agencies: - Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority (GBRMPA), - Department of Environment and Resource Management (DERM), - Australian Marine Mammal Centre (AMMC), - Torres Strait Regional Authority (TSRA), - Australian Fisheries Management Authority (AFMA), - Marine and Tropical Sciences Research Facility (MTSRF), - National Environmental Research Program (NERP).</p>", "<p>This dataset consists of transect maps (jpg) and additional metadata (pdf). Please contact Helene Marsh Helene.Marsh@jcu.edu.au for GIS data.</p>", "<p>This dataset consists of transect maps (jpg) and additional metadata (pdf). Please contact Helene Marsh Helene.Marsh@jcu.edu.au for GIS data.</p>", ""] ["brief", "note", "note", "full", "full", "<p>Sightings for dugongs, cetaceans and turtles in the Pilbara area during the dugong aerial surveys in 2000.</p>", "<p>Sightings for dugongs, cetaceans and turtles in the Pilbara area during the dugong aerial surveys in 2000.</p>", "<p>Funding for these surveys was obtained from the following government agencies: - Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority (GBRMPA), - Department of Environment and Resource Management (DERM), - Australian Marine Mammal Centre (AMMC), - Torres Strait Regional Authority (TSRA), - Australian Fisheries Management Authority (AFMA), - Marine and Tropical Sciences Research Facility (MTSRF), - National Environmental Research Program (NERP).</p>", "<p>Funding for these surveys was obtained from the following government agencies: - Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority (GBRMPA), - Department of Environment and Resource Management (DERM), - Australian Marine Mammal Centre (AMMC), - Torres Strait Regional Authority (TSRA), - Australian Fisheries Management Authority (AFMA), - Marine and Tropical Sciences Research Facility (MTSRF), - National Environmental Research Program (NERP).</p>", "<p>This dataset consists of transect maps (jpg) and additional metadata (pdf). Please contact Helene Marsh Helene.Marsh@jcu.edu.au for GIS data.</p>", "<p>This dataset consists of transect maps (jpg) and additional metadata (pdf). Please contact Helene Marsh Helene.Marsh@jcu.edu.au for GIS data.</p>", ""] Dugong aerial survey (cetacean, dugong, turtle) Shark Bay, July 1989 fascinator fe69cfe7349a49200eb3debcae9b5a53 2019-03-15T12:57:44Z ["brief", "full", "note", "note", "full", "full", "<p>Sightings for dugongs, cetacean and turtle species in Shark Bay area during the dugong aerial surveys in July 1989.</p>", "<p>Sightings for dugongs, cetacean and turtle species in Shark Bay area during the dugong aerial surveys in July 1989.</p>", "<p>Strip-transect aerial surveys of Shark Bay, Ningaloo Reef and Exmouth Gulf were conducted during the winters of 1989 and 1994. These surveys were designed primarily to estimate the abundance and distribution of dugongs, although they also allowed sea turtles and dolphins, and, to a lesser extent, whales, manta rays and whale sharks to be surveyed. Shark Bay contains a large population of dugongs that is of international significance. Estimates of approximately 10000 dugongs resulted from both surveys. The density of dugongs is the highest recorded in Australia and the Middle East, where these surveys have been conducted. Exmouth Gulf and Ningaloo Reef are also important dugong habitats, each supporting in the order of 1000 dugongs. The estimated number of turtles in Shark Bay is comparable to the number in Exmouth Gulf plus Ningaloo Reef (7000-9000). The density of turtles in Ningaloo Reef and, to a lesser extent, Exmouth Gulf is exceptionally high compared with most other areas that have been surveyed by the same technique. Shark Bay supports a substantial population of bottlenose dolphins (2000-3000 minimum estimate). Exmouth Gulf and Ningaloo Reef were not significant habitats for dolphins during the winter surveys. Substantial numbers of whales (primarily humpbacks) and manta rays occur in northern and western Shark Bay in winter. Ningaloo Reef is an important area for whale sharks and manta rays in autumn and winter. The Shark Bay Marine Park excludes much of the winter habitats of the large vertebrate fauna of Shark Bay. In 1989 and 1994, more than half of all the dugongs were seen outside the Marine Park (57.4 and 50.7%, respectively). Approximately one-third to one-half of turtles and dolphins were seen outside the Marine Park (in 1989 and 1994 respectively: turtles, 43 and 27%; dolphins, 47 and 32%). Almost all the whales and most of the manta rays were seen outside the Marine Park. Expansion of the Shark Bay Marine Park, to bring it into alignment with the marine section of the Shark Bay World Heritage Area, would facilitate the appropriate management of these populations. This would also simplify the State-Commonwealth collaboration necessary to meet the obligations of World Heritage listing. The coastal waters of Western Australia north of the surveyed area (over 6000 km of coastline) are relatively poorly known and surveys of their marine megafauna are required for wise planning and management.</p>", "<p>Strip-transect aerial surveys of Shark Bay, Ningaloo Reef and Exmouth Gulf were conducted during the winters of 1989 and 1994. These surveys were designed primarily to estimate the abundance and distribution of dugongs, although they also allowed sea turtles and dolphins, and, to a lesser extent, whales, manta rays and whale sharks to be surveyed. Shark Bay contains a large population of dugongs that is of international significance. Estimates of approximately 10000 dugongs resulted from both surveys. The density of dugongs is the highest recorded in Australia and the Middle East, where these surveys have been conducted. Exmouth Gulf and Ningaloo Reef are also important dugong habitats, each supporting in the order of 1000 dugongs. The estimated number of turtles in Shark Bay is comparable to the number in Exmouth Gulf plus Ningaloo Reef (7000-9000). The density of turtles in Ningaloo Reef and, to a lesser extent, Exmouth Gulf is exceptionally high compared with most other areas that have been surveyed by the same technique. Shark Bay supports a substantial population of bottlenose dolphins (2000-3000 minimum estimate). Exmouth Gulf and Ningaloo Reef were not significant habitats for dolphins during the winter surveys. Substantial numbers of whales (primarily humpbacks) and manta rays occur in northern and western Shark Bay in winter. Ningaloo Reef is an important area for whale sharks and manta rays in autumn and winter. The Shark Bay Marine Park excludes much of the winter habitats of the large vertebrate fauna of Shark Bay. In 1989 and 1994, more than half of all the dugongs were seen outside the Marine Park (57.4 and 50.7%, respectively). Approximately one-third to one-half of turtles and dolphins were seen outside the Marine Park (in 1989 and 1994 respectively: turtles, 43 and 27%; dolphins, 47 and 32%). Almost all the whales and most of the manta rays were seen outside the Marine Park. Expansion of the Shark Bay Marine Park, to bring it into alignment with the marine section of the Shark Bay World Heritage Area, would facilitate the appropriate management of these populations. This would also simplify the State-Commonwealth collaboration necessary to meet the obligations of World Heritage listing. The coastal waters of Western Australia north of the surveyed area (over 6000 km of coastline) are relatively poorly known and surveys of their marine megafauna are required for wise planning and management.</p>", "<p>Funding for these surveys was obtained from the following government agencies: - Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority (GBRMPA), - Department of Environment and Resource Management (DERM), - Australian Marine Mammal Centre (AMMC), - Torres Strait Regional Authority (TSRA), - Australian Fisheries Management Authority (AFMA), - Marine and Tropical Sciences Research Facility (MTSRF), - National Environmental Research Program (NERP).</p>", "<p>Funding for these surveys was obtained from the following government agencies: - Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority (GBRMPA), - Department of Environment and Resource Management (DERM), - Australian Marine Mammal Centre (AMMC), - Torres Strait Regional Authority (TSRA), - Australian Fisheries Management Authority (AFMA), - Marine and Tropical Sciences Research Facility (MTSRF), - National Environmental Research Program (NERP).</p>", "<p>This dataset consists of transect maps (jpg) and additional metadata (pdf) for the July 1989 survey. Please contact Helene Marsh Helene.Marsh@jcu.edu.au for GIS data. Additionally, the report (pdf) covering both the 1989 and 1994 surveys is included. </p>", "<p>This dataset consists of transect maps (jpg) and additional metadata (pdf) for the July 1989 survey. Please contact Helene Marsh Helene.Marsh@jcu.edu.au for GIS data. Additionally, the report (pdf) covering both the 1989 and 1994 surveys is included. </p>", ""] ["brief", "full", "note", "note", "full", "full", "<p>Sightings for dugongs, cetacean and turtle species in Shark Bay area during the dugong aerial surveys in July 1989.</p>", "<p>Sightings for dugongs, cetacean and turtle species in Shark Bay area during the dugong aerial surveys in July 1989.</p>", "<p>Strip-transect aerial surveys of Shark Bay, Ningaloo Reef and Exmouth Gulf were conducted during the winters of 1989 and 1994. These surveys were designed primarily to estimate the abundance and distribution of dugongs, although they also allowed sea turtles and dolphins, and, to a lesser extent, whales, manta rays and whale sharks to be surveyed. Shark Bay contains a large population of dugongs that is of international significance. Estimates of approximately 10000 dugongs resulted from both surveys. The density of dugongs is the highest recorded in Australia and the Middle East, where these surveys have been conducted. Exmouth Gulf and Ningaloo Reef are also important dugong habitats, each supporting in the order of 1000 dugongs. The estimated number of turtles in Shark Bay is comparable to the number in Exmouth Gulf plus Ningaloo Reef (7000-9000). The density of turtles in Ningaloo Reef and, to a lesser extent, Exmouth Gulf is exceptionally high compared with most other areas that have been surveyed by the same technique. Shark Bay supports a substantial population of bottlenose dolphins (2000-3000 minimum estimate). Exmouth Gulf and Ningaloo Reef were not significant habitats for dolphins during the winter surveys. Substantial numbers of whales (primarily humpbacks) and manta rays occur in northern and western Shark Bay in winter. Ningaloo Reef is an important area for whale sharks and manta rays in autumn and winter. The Shark Bay Marine Park excludes much of the winter habitats of the large vertebrate fauna of Shark Bay. In 1989 and 1994, more than half of all the dugongs were seen outside the Marine Park (57.4 and 50.7%, respectively). Approximately one-third to one-half of turtles and dolphins were seen outside the Marine Park (in 1989 and 1994 respectively: turtles, 43 and 27%; dolphins, 47 and 32%). Almost all the whales and most of the manta rays were seen outside the Marine Park. Expansion of the Shark Bay Marine Park, to bring it into alignment with the marine section of the Shark Bay World Heritage Area, would facilitate the appropriate management of these populations. This would also simplify the State-Commonwealth collaboration necessary to meet the obligations of World Heritage listing. The coastal waters of Western Australia north of the surveyed area (over 6000 km of coastline) are relatively poorly known and surveys of their marine megafauna are required for wise planning and management.</p>", "<p>Strip-transect aerial surveys of Shark Bay, Ningaloo Reef and Exmouth Gulf were conducted during the winters of 1989 and 1994. These surveys were designed primarily to estimate the abundance and distribution of dugongs, although they also allowed sea turtles and dolphins, and, to a lesser extent, whales, manta rays and whale sharks to be surveyed. Shark Bay contains a large population of dugongs that is of international significance. Estimates of approximately 10000 dugongs resulted from both surveys. The density of dugongs is the highest recorded in Australia and the Middle East, where these surveys have been conducted. Exmouth Gulf and Ningaloo Reef are also important dugong habitats, each supporting in the order of 1000 dugongs. The estimated number of turtles in Shark Bay is comparable to the number in Exmouth Gulf plus Ningaloo Reef (7000-9000). The density of turtles in Ningaloo Reef and, to a lesser extent, Exmouth Gulf is exceptionally high compared with most other areas that have been surveyed by the same technique. Shark Bay supports a substantial population of bottlenose dolphins (2000-3000 minimum estimate). Exmouth Gulf and Ningaloo Reef were not significant habitats for dolphins during the winter surveys. Substantial numbers of whales (primarily humpbacks) and manta rays occur in northern and western Shark Bay in winter. Ningaloo Reef is an important area for whale sharks and manta rays in autumn and winter. The Shark Bay Marine Park excludes much of the winter habitats of the large vertebrate fauna of Shark Bay. In 1989 and 1994, more than half of all the dugongs were seen outside the Marine Park (57.4 and 50.7%, respectively). Approximately one-third to one-half of turtles and dolphins were seen outside the Marine Park (in 1989 and 1994 respectively: turtles, 43 and 27%; dolphins, 47 and 32%). Almost all the whales and most of the manta rays were seen outside the Marine Park. Expansion of the Shark Bay Marine Park, to bring it into alignment with the marine section of the Shark Bay World Heritage Area, would facilitate the appropriate management of these populations. This would also simplify the State-Commonwealth collaboration necessary to meet the obligations of World Heritage listing. The coastal waters of Western Australia north of the surveyed area (over 6000 km of coastline) are relatively poorly known and surveys of their marine megafauna are required for wise planning and management.</p>", "<p>Funding for these surveys was obtained from the following government agencies: - Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority (GBRMPA), - Department of Environment and Resource Management (DERM), - Australian Marine Mammal Centre (AMMC), - Torres Strait Regional Authority (TSRA), - Australian Fisheries Management Authority (AFMA), - Marine and Tropical Sciences Research Facility (MTSRF), - National Environmental Research Program (NERP).</p>", "<p>Funding for these surveys was obtained from the following government agencies: - Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority (GBRMPA), - Department of Environment and Resource Management (DERM), - Australian Marine Mammal Centre (AMMC), - Torres Strait Regional Authority (TSRA), - Australian Fisheries Management Authority (AFMA), - Marine and Tropical Sciences Research Facility (MTSRF), - National Environmental Research Program (NERP).</p>", "<p>This dataset consists of transect maps (jpg) and additional metadata (pdf) for the July 1989 survey. Please contact Helene Marsh Helene.Marsh@jcu.edu.au for GIS data. Additionally, the report (pdf) covering both the 1989 and 1994 surveys is included. </p>", "<p>This dataset consists of transect maps (jpg) and additional metadata (pdf) for the July 1989 survey. Please contact Helene Marsh Helene.Marsh@jcu.edu.au for GIS data. Additionally, the report (pdf) covering both the 1989 and 1994 surveys is included. </p>", ""] Dugong aerial survey (cetacean, dugong, turtle) Shark Bay, July 1994 fascinator 9cb14d28cd696bc30d8c08014081657c 2019-03-15T12:58:27Z ["brief", "full", "note", "note", "note", "full", "<p>Sightings for dugongs, cetaceans and marine turtles in Shark Bay area during the dugong aerial surveys in June 1994.</p>", "<p>Sightings for dugongs, cetaceans and marine turtles in Shark Bay area during the dugong aerial surveys in June 1994.</p>", "<p>Strip-transect aerial surveys of Shark Bay, Ningaloo Reef and Exmouth Gulf were conducted during the winters of 1989 and 1994. These surveys were designed primarily to estimate the abundance and distribution of dugongs, although they also allowed sea turtles and dolphins, and, to a lesser extent, whales, manta rays and whale sharks to be surveyed. Shark Bay contains a large population of dugongs that is of international significance. Estimates of approximately 10000 dugongs resulted from both surveys. The density of dugongs is the highest recorded in Australia and the Middle East, where these surveys have been conducted. Exmouth Gulf and Ningaloo Reef are also important dugong habitats, each supporting in the order of 1000 dugongs. The estimated number of turtles in Shark Bay is comparable to the number in Exmouth Gulf plus Ningaloo Reef (7000-9000). The density of turtles in Ningaloo Reef and, to a lesser extent, Exmouth Gulf is exceptionally high compared with most other areas that have been surveyed by the same technique. Shark Bay supports a substantial population of bottlenose dolphins (2000-3000 minimum estimate). Exmouth Gulf and Ningaloo Reef were not significant habitats for dolphins during the winter surveys. Substantial numbers of whales (primarily humpbacks) and manta rays occur in northern and western Shark Bay in winter. Ningaloo Reef is an important area for whale sharks and manta rays in autumn and winter. The Shark Bay Marine Park excludes much of the winter habitats of the large vertebrate fauna of Shark Bay. In 1989 and 1994, more than half of all the dugongs were seen outside the Marine Park (57.4 and 50.7%, respectively). Approximately one-third to one-half of turtles and dolphins were seen outside the Marine Park (in 1989 and 1994 respectively: turtles, 43 and 27%; dolphins, 47 and 32%). Almost all the whales and most of the manta rays were seen outside the Marine Park. Expansion of the Shark Bay Marine Park, to bring it into alignment with the marine section of the Shark Bay World Heritage Area, would facilitate the appropriate management of these populations. This would also simplify the State-Commonwealth collaboration necessary to meet the obligations of World Heritage listing. The coastal waters of Western Australia north of the surveyed area (over 6000 km of coastline) are relatively poorly known and surveys of their marine megafauna are required for wise planning and management.</p>", "<p>Strip-transect aerial surveys of Shark Bay, Ningaloo Reef and Exmouth Gulf were conducted during the winters of 1989 and 1994. These surveys were designed primarily to estimate the abundance and distribution of dugongs, although they also allowed sea turtles and dolphins, and, to a lesser extent, whales, manta rays and whale sharks to be surveyed. Shark Bay contains a large population of dugongs that is of international significance. Estimates of approximately 10000 dugongs resulted from both surveys. The density of dugongs is the highest recorded in Australia and the Middle East, where these surveys have been conducted. Exmouth Gulf and Ningaloo Reef are also important dugong habitats, each supporting in the order of 1000 dugongs. The estimated number of turtles in Shark Bay is comparable to the number in Exmouth Gulf plus Ningaloo Reef (7000-9000). The density of turtles in Ningaloo Reef and, to a lesser extent, Exmouth Gulf is exceptionally high compared with most other areas that have been surveyed by the same technique. Shark Bay supports a substantial population of bottlenose dolphins (2000-3000 minimum estimate). Exmouth Gulf and Ningaloo Reef were not significant habitats for dolphins during the winter surveys. Substantial numbers of whales (primarily humpbacks) and manta rays occur in northern and western Shark Bay in winter. Ningaloo Reef is an important area for whale sharks and manta rays in autumn and winter. The Shark Bay Marine Park excludes much of the winter habitats of the large vertebrate fauna of Shark Bay. In 1989 and 1994, more than half of all the dugongs were seen outside the Marine Park (57.4 and 50.7%, respectively). Approximately one-third to one-half of turtles and dolphins were seen outside the Marine Park (in 1989 and 1994 respectively: turtles, 43 and 27%; dolphins, 47 and 32%). Almost all the whales and most of the manta rays were seen outside the Marine Park. Expansion of the Shark Bay Marine Park, to bring it into alignment with the marine section of the Shark Bay World Heritage Area, would facilitate the appropriate management of these populations. This would also simplify the State-Commonwealth collaboration necessary to meet the obligations of World Heritage listing. The coastal waters of Western Australia north of the surveyed area (over 6000 km of coastline) are relatively poorly known and surveys of their marine megafauna are required for wise planning and management.</p>", "<p>Funding for these surveys was obtained from the following government agencies: - Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority (GBRMPA), - Department of Environment and Resource Management (DERM), - Australian Marine Mammal Centre (AMMC), - Torres Strait Regional Authority (TSRA), - Australian Fisheries Management Authority (AFMA), - Marine and Tropical Sciences Research Facility (MTSRF), - National Environmental Research Program (NERP).</p>", "<p>Funding for these surveys was obtained from the following government agencies: - Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority (GBRMPA), - Department of Environment and Resource Management (DERM), - Australian Marine Mammal Centre (AMMC), - Torres Strait Regional Authority (TSRA), - Australian Fisheries Management Authority (AFMA), - Marine and Tropical Sciences Research Facility (MTSRF), - National Environmental Research Program (NERP).</p>", "<p>This dataset consists of transect maps (jpg), additional metadata (pdf) and a report (pdf).</p>", "<p>This dataset consists of transect maps (jpg), additional metadata (pdf) and a report (pdf).</p>", "<p>Please contact Helene Marsh Helene.Marsh@jcu.edu.au for GIS data.</p>", "<p>Please contact Helene Marsh Helene.Marsh@jcu.edu.au for GIS data.</p>", ""] ["brief", "full", "note", "note", "note", "full", "<p>Sightings for dugongs, cetaceans and marine turtles in Shark Bay area during the dugong aerial surveys in June 1994.</p>", "<p>Sightings for dugongs, cetaceans and marine turtles in Shark Bay area during the dugong aerial surveys in June 1994.</p>", "<p>Strip-transect aerial surveys of Shark Bay, Ningaloo Reef and Exmouth Gulf were conducted during the winters of 1989 and 1994. These surveys were designed primarily to estimate the abundance and distribution of dugongs, although they also allowed sea turtles and dolphins, and, to a lesser extent, whales, manta rays and whale sharks to be surveyed. Shark Bay contains a large population of dugongs that is of international significance. Estimates of approximately 10000 dugongs resulted from both surveys. The density of dugongs is the highest recorded in Australia and the Middle East, where these surveys have been conducted. Exmouth Gulf and Ningaloo Reef are also important dugong habitats, each supporting in the order of 1000 dugongs. The estimated number of turtles in Shark Bay is comparable to the number in Exmouth Gulf plus Ningaloo Reef (7000-9000). The density of turtles in Ningaloo Reef and, to a lesser extent, Exmouth Gulf is exceptionally high compared with most other areas that have been surveyed by the same technique. Shark Bay supports a substantial population of bottlenose dolphins (2000-3000 minimum estimate). Exmouth Gulf and Ningaloo Reef were not significant habitats for dolphins during the winter surveys. Substantial numbers of whales (primarily humpbacks) and manta rays occur in northern and western Shark Bay in winter. Ningaloo Reef is an important area for whale sharks and manta rays in autumn and winter. The Shark Bay Marine Park excludes much of the winter habitats of the large vertebrate fauna of Shark Bay. In 1989 and 1994, more than half of all the dugongs were seen outside the Marine Park (57.4 and 50.7%, respectively). Approximately one-third to one-half of turtles and dolphins were seen outside the Marine Park (in 1989 and 1994 respectively: turtles, 43 and 27%; dolphins, 47 and 32%). Almost all the whales and most of the manta rays were seen outside the Marine Park. Expansion of the Shark Bay Marine Park, to bring it into alignment with the marine section of the Shark Bay World Heritage Area, would facilitate the appropriate management of these populations. This would also simplify the State-Commonwealth collaboration necessary to meet the obligations of World Heritage listing. The coastal waters of Western Australia north of the surveyed area (over 6000 km of coastline) are relatively poorly known and surveys of their marine megafauna are required for wise planning and management.</p>", "<p>Strip-transect aerial surveys of Shark Bay, Ningaloo Reef and Exmouth Gulf were conducted during the winters of 1989 and 1994. These surveys were designed primarily to estimate the abundance and distribution of dugongs, although they also allowed sea turtles and dolphins, and, to a lesser extent, whales, manta rays and whale sharks to be surveyed. Shark Bay contains a large population of dugongs that is of international significance. Estimates of approximately 10000 dugongs resulted from both surveys. The density of dugongs is the highest recorded in Australia and the Middle East, where these surveys have been conducted. Exmouth Gulf and Ningaloo Reef are also important dugong habitats, each supporting in the order of 1000 dugongs. The estimated number of turtles in Shark Bay is comparable to the number in Exmouth Gulf plus Ningaloo Reef (7000-9000). The density of turtles in Ningaloo Reef and, to a lesser extent, Exmouth Gulf is exceptionally high compared with most other areas that have been surveyed by the same technique. Shark Bay supports a substantial population of bottlenose dolphins (2000-3000 minimum estimate). Exmouth Gulf and Ningaloo Reef were not significant habitats for dolphins during the winter surveys. Substantial numbers of whales (primarily humpbacks) and manta rays occur in northern and western Shark Bay in winter. Ningaloo Reef is an important area for whale sharks and manta rays in autumn and winter. The Shark Bay Marine Park excludes much of the winter habitats of the large vertebrate fauna of Shark Bay. In 1989 and 1994, more than half of all the dugongs were seen outside the Marine Park (57.4 and 50.7%, respectively). Approximately one-third to one-half of turtles and dolphins were seen outside the Marine Park (in 1989 and 1994 respectively: turtles, 43 and 27%; dolphins, 47 and 32%). Almost all the whales and most of the manta rays were seen outside the Marine Park. Expansion of the Shark Bay Marine Park, to bring it into alignment with the marine section of the Shark Bay World Heritage Area, would facilitate the appropriate management of these populations. This would also simplify the State-Commonwealth collaboration necessary to meet the obligations of World Heritage listing. The coastal waters of Western Australia north of the surveyed area (over 6000 km of coastline) are relatively poorly known and surveys of their marine megafauna are required for wise planning and management.</p>", "<p>Funding for these surveys was obtained from the following government agencies: - Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority (GBRMPA), - Department of Environment and Resource Management (DERM), - Australian Marine Mammal Centre (AMMC), - Torres Strait Regional Authority (TSRA), - Australian Fisheries Management Authority (AFMA), - Marine and Tropical Sciences Research Facility (MTSRF), - National Environmental Research Program (NERP).</p>", "<p>Funding for these surveys was obtained from the following government agencies: - Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority (GBRMPA), - Department of Environment and Resource Management (DERM), - Australian Marine Mammal Centre (AMMC), - Torres Strait Regional Authority (TSRA), - Australian Fisheries Management Authority (AFMA), - Marine and Tropical Sciences Research Facility (MTSRF), - National Environmental Research Program (NERP).</p>", "<p>This dataset consists of transect maps (jpg), additional metadata (pdf) and a report (pdf).</p>", "<p>This dataset consists of transect maps (jpg), additional metadata (pdf) and a report (pdf).</p>", "<p>Please contact Helene Marsh Helene.Marsh@jcu.edu.au for GIS data.</p>", "<p>Please contact Helene Marsh Helene.Marsh@jcu.edu.au for GIS data.</p>", ""] Dugong aerial survey (dugong) Torres Strait, 2001 fascinator d836b2e57ea91df4e9531dd527721513 2019-03-15T12:53:43Z ["brief", "note", "note", "note", "full", "<p>Sighting for dugongs in Torres Strait area during the dugong aerials surveys in 2001.</p>", "<p>Sighting for dugongs in Torres Strait area during the dugong aerials surveys in 2001.</p>", "<p>Funding for these surveys was obtained from the following government agencies: - Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority (GBRMPA), - Department of Environment and Resource Management (DERM), - Australian Marine Mammal Centre (AMMC), - Torres Strait Regional Authority (TSRA), - Australian Fisheries Management Authority (AFMA), - Marine and Tropical Sciences Research Facility (MTSRF), - National Environmental Research Program (NERP).</p>", "<p>Funding for these surveys was obtained from the following government agencies: - Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority (GBRMPA), - Department of Environment and Resource Management (DERM), - Australian Marine Mammal Centre (AMMC), - Torres Strait Regional Authority (TSRA), - Australian Fisheries Management Authority (AFMA), - Marine and Tropical Sciences Research Facility (MTSRF), - National Environmental Research Program (NERP).</p>", "<p>This dataset consists of an abundance/distribution and a transect map (jpg), additional metadata (pdf) and a report (pdf).</p>", "<p>This dataset consists of an abundance/distribution and a transect map (jpg), additional metadata (pdf) and a report (pdf).</p>", "<p>Please contact Helene Marsh Helene.Marsh@jcu.edu.au for GIS data.</p>", "<p>Please contact Helene Marsh Helene.Marsh@jcu.edu.au for GIS data.</p>", ""] ["brief", "note", "note", "note", "full", "<p>Sighting for dugongs in Torres Strait area during the dugong aerials surveys in 2001.</p>", "<p>Sighting for dugongs in Torres Strait area during the dugong aerials surveys in 2001.</p>", "<p>Funding for these surveys was obtained from the following government agencies: - Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority (GBRMPA), - Department of Environment and Resource Management (DERM), - Australian Marine Mammal Centre (AMMC), - Torres Strait Regional Authority (TSRA), - Australian Fisheries Management Authority (AFMA), - Marine and Tropical Sciences Research Facility (MTSRF), - National Environmental Research Program (NERP).</p>", "<p>Funding for these surveys was obtained from the following government agencies: - Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority (GBRMPA), - Department of Environment and Resource Management (DERM), - Australian Marine Mammal Centre (AMMC), - Torres Strait Regional Authority (TSRA), - Australian Fisheries Management Authority (AFMA), - Marine and Tropical Sciences Research Facility (MTSRF), - National Environmental Research Program (NERP).</p>", "<p>This dataset consists of an abundance/distribution and a transect map (jpg), additional metadata (pdf) and a report (pdf).</p>", "<p>This dataset consists of an abundance/distribution and a transect map (jpg), additional metadata (pdf) and a report (pdf).</p>", "<p>Please contact Helene Marsh Helene.Marsh@jcu.edu.au for GIS data.</p>", "<p>Please contact Helene Marsh Helene.Marsh@jcu.edu.au for GIS data.</p>", ""] Dugong aerial survey (dugong) Torres Strait, November 1996 fascinator ffdf0b9b3cf4fb1bfc4ef91ce63cd5a7 2019-03-15T12:54:08Z ["brief", "note", "note", "note", "full", "<p>Sightings for dugongs in Torres Strait area during the dugong aerials surveys in November 1996.</p>", "<p>Sightings for dugongs in Torres Strait area during the dugong aerials surveys in November 1996.</p>", "<p>Funding for these surveys was obtained from the following government agencies: - Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority (GBRMPA), - Department of Environment and Resource Management (DERM), - Australian Marine Mammal Centre (AMMC), - Torres Strait Regional Authority (TSRA), - Australian Fisheries Management Authority (AFMA), - Marine and Tropical Sciences Research Facility (MTSRF), - National Environmental Research Program (NERP).</p>", "<p>Funding for these surveys was obtained from the following government agencies: - Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority (GBRMPA), - Department of Environment and Resource Management (DERM), - Australian Marine Mammal Centre (AMMC), - Torres Strait Regional Authority (TSRA), - Australian Fisheries Management Authority (AFMA), - Marine and Tropical Sciences Research Facility (MTSRF), - National Environmental Research Program (NERP).</p>", "<p>This dataset consists of abundance/distribution and transect maps (jpg),additional metadata (pdf) and a report (pdf).</p>", "<p>This dataset consists of abundance/distribution and transect maps (jpg),additional metadata (pdf) and a report (pdf).</p>", "<p>Please contact Helene Marsh Helene.Marsh@jcu.edu.au for GIS data.</p>", "<p>Please contact Helene Marsh Helene.Marsh@jcu.edu.au for GIS data.</p>", "<p>The western and central waters of Torres Strait north of 11°S were surveyed between the 10th and 13th of November 1996 using two suryey crews on two Partenavia 688 aircraft to minimise the chance of the population estimates being confounded by local movements of dugongs within the survey period. As in the 1987 and 1991 surveys, the area was divided into eight blocks on the basis of sampling intensity and transect placement. Transects were aligned in an east-west direction south of Buro (Tumagain) Island (9° 34'S, 142° 18'E), and north-south along the coast of Papua New Guinea. Transect lines were spaced 5' apart in Blocks 0, 1B, 3 and 4; and at intervals of 2.5' in Blocks 1A, 2A, 2B and 5. The survey design was determined by: (1) the boundariesof Austalian air space, (2) the known distribution of suitable dugong habitat, (3) the enduance of the aircraft from Horn Island, the only site in Austalian territory itr the region where aircraft fuel could be purchased, and (4) the aircraft time available for the survey. The design was the same as that used in the previous surveys except that: (1) of the seven eastern most transects in Block 1A, the two short transects were not flown and the remaining five were truncated at 9°10'S because we were unable to enter Papua New Guinea air space close to Daru, and (2) as in 1991, the survey intensity in Blocks 0 ard 1B was halved from that used in 1987 by increasing the interval between successive transects from 2.5' in 1987 to 5'. A total of 30,568 km² were surveyed in 1996. A global positioning system mounted in the aircraft facilitated prccise and accuste navigation. The aircmfl was frtted with a ladar altimeterfor accurateheight control. In order to increase repeatability,the survey was conducted only when the weather conditions were good (usually Beaufort sea State ≤ 3). Whenever possible, daily schedules were arranged to avoid severe glare associated with a low or midday sun. Block areas were estimated from 1:100,000 digitised topographic coverage (AUSLIG) using the ArcInfo GIS package. The areas of all islands were excluded from the block areas. The length of each transect was also estimated from these digitised maps. Survey methodology As in 1987 and 1991, we used the strip transect aerial survey methodology as detailed by Marsh and Sincair (1989a and b) andMarsh and Saalfeld(1989b) We chose to continue using this methodology rather than the line transect methods now routinely used for dolphin surveys(eg. Barlow et al. 1997) because: (1) consistent methodology is essential to a reliable time series,(2) Marsh and Saalfeld (1990) verified that the strip width used is sufficiently narrow to preclude detectable variation in dugong sightability across the transect, and (3) dugongs are generally more difficult to sight than dolphins. Dugongs are most often seen as solitary individuals or adult female-calf pairs in turbid water and exhibit cryptic surfacing behaviour.We therefore preferred to use a technique in which the observers do not have to take their eyes off the water to read an inclinometer.</p>", "<p>The western and central waters of Torres Strait north of 11°S were surveyed between the 10th and 13th of November 1996 using two suryey crews on two Partenavia 688 aircraft to minimise the chance of the population estimates being confounded by local movements of dugongs within the survey period. As in the 1987 and 1991 surveys, the area was divided into eight blocks on the basis of sampling intensity and transect placement. Transects were aligned in an east-west direction south of Buro (Tumagain) Island (9° 34'S, 142° 18'E), and north-south along the coast of Papua New Guinea. Transect lines were spaced 5' apart in Blocks 0, 1B, 3 and 4; and at intervals of 2.5' in Blocks 1A, 2A, 2B and 5. The survey design was determined by: (1) the boundariesof Austalian air space, (2) the known distribution of suitable dugong habitat, (3) the enduance of the aircraft from Horn Island, the only site in Austalian territory itr the region where aircraft fuel could be purchased, and (4) the aircraft time available for the survey. The design was the same as that used in the previous surveys except that: (1) of the seven eastern most transects in Block 1A, the two short transects were not flown and the remaining five were truncated at 9°10'S because we were unable to enter Papua New Guinea air space close to Daru, and (2) as in 1991, the survey intensity in Blocks 0 ard 1B was halved from that used in 1987 by increasing the interval between successive transects from 2.5' in 1987 to 5'. A total of 30,568 km² were surveyed in 1996. A global positioning system mounted in the aircraft facilitated prccise and accuste navigation. The aircmfl was frtted with a ladar altimeterfor accurateheight control. In order to increase repeatability,the survey was conducted only when the weather conditions were good (usually Beaufort sea State ≤ 3). Whenever possible, daily schedules were arranged to avoid severe glare associated with a low or midday sun. Block areas were estimated from 1:100,000 digitised topographic coverage (AUSLIG) using the ArcInfo GIS package. The areas of all islands were excluded from the block areas. The length of each transect was also estimated from these digitised maps. Survey methodology As in 1987 and 1991, we used the strip transect aerial survey methodology as detailed by Marsh and Sincair (1989a and b) andMarsh and Saalfeld(1989b) We chose to continue using this methodology rather than the line transect methods now routinely used for dolphin surveys(eg. Barlow et al. 1997) because: (1) consistent methodology is essential to a reliable time series,(2) Marsh and Saalfeld (1990) verified that the strip width used is sufficiently narrow to preclude detectable variation in dugong sightability across the transect, and (3) dugongs are generally more difficult to sight than dolphins. Dugongs are most often seen as solitary individuals or adult female-calf pairs in turbid water and exhibit cryptic surfacing behaviour.We therefore preferred to use a technique in which the observers do not have to take their eyes off the water to read an inclinometer. </p>", ""] ["brief", "note", "note", "note", "full", "<p>Sightings for dugongs in Torres Strait area during the dugong aerials surveys in November 1996.</p>", "<p>Sightings for dugongs in Torres Strait area during the dugong aerials surveys in November 1996.</p>", "<p>Funding for these surveys was obtained from the following government agencies: - Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority (GBRMPA), - Department of Environment and Resource Management (DERM), - Australian Marine Mammal Centre (AMMC), - Torres Strait Regional Authority (TSRA), - Australian Fisheries Management Authority (AFMA), - Marine and Tropical Sciences Research Facility (MTSRF), - National Environmental Research Program (NERP).</p>", "<p>Funding for these surveys was obtained from the following government agencies: - Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority (GBRMPA), - Department of Environment and Resource Management (DERM), - Australian Marine Mammal Centre (AMMC), - Torres Strait Regional Authority (TSRA), - Australian Fisheries Management Authority (AFMA), - Marine and Tropical Sciences Research Facility (MTSRF), - National Environmental Research Program (NERP).</p>", "<p>This dataset consists of abundance/distribution and transect maps (jpg),additional metadata (pdf) and a report (pdf).</p>", "<p>This dataset consists of abundance/distribution and transect maps (jpg),additional metadata (pdf) and a report (pdf).</p>", "<p>Please contact Helene Marsh Helene.Marsh@jcu.edu.au for GIS data.</p>", "<p>Please contact Helene Marsh Helene.Marsh@jcu.edu.au for GIS data.</p>", "<p>The western and central waters of Torres Strait north of 11°S were surveyed between the 10th and 13th of November 1996 using two suryey crews on two Partenavia 688 aircraft to minimise the chance of the population estimates being confounded by local movements of dugongs within the survey period. As in the 1987 and 1991 surveys, the area was divided into eight blocks on the basis of sampling intensity and transect placement. Transects were aligned in an east-west direction south of Buro (Tumagain) Island (9° 34'S, 142° 18'E), and north-south along the coast of Papua New Guinea. Transect lines were spaced 5' apart in Blocks 0, 1B, 3 and 4; and at intervals of 2.5' in Blocks 1A, 2A, 2B and 5. The survey design was determined by: (1) the boundariesof Austalian air space, (2) the known distribution of suitable dugong habitat, (3) the enduance of the aircraft from Horn Island, the only site in Austalian territory itr the region where aircraft fuel could be purchased, and (4) the aircraft time available for the survey. The design was the same as that used in the previous surveys except that: (1) of the seven eastern most transects in Block 1A, the two short transects were not flown and the remaining five were truncated at 9°10'S because we were unable to enter Papua New Guinea air space close to Daru, and (2) as in 1991, the survey intensity in Blocks 0 ard 1B was halved from that used in 1987 by increasing the interval between successive transects from 2.5' in 1987 to 5'. A total of 30,568 km² were surveyed in 1996. A global positioning system mounted in the aircraft facilitated prccise and accuste navigation. The aircmfl was frtted with a ladar altimeterfor accurateheight control. In order to increase repeatability,the survey was conducted only when the weather conditions were good (usually Beaufort sea State ≤ 3). Whenever possible, daily schedules were arranged to avoid severe glare associated with a low or midday sun. Block areas were estimated from 1:100,000 digitised topographic coverage (AUSLIG) using the ArcInfo GIS package. The areas of all islands were excluded from the block areas. The length of each transect was also estimated from these digitised maps. Survey methodology As in 1987 and 1991, we used the strip transect aerial survey methodology as detailed by Marsh and Sincair (1989a and b) andMarsh and Saalfeld(1989b) We chose to continue using this methodology rather than the line transect methods now routinely used for dolphin surveys(eg. Barlow et al. 1997) because: (1) consistent methodology is essential to a reliable time series,(2) Marsh and Saalfeld (1990) verified that the strip width used is sufficiently narrow to preclude detectable variation in dugong sightability across the transect, and (3) dugongs are generally more difficult to sight than dolphins. Dugongs are most often seen as solitary individuals or adult female-calf pairs in turbid water and exhibit cryptic surfacing behaviour.We therefore preferred to use a technique in which the observers do not have to take their eyes off the water to read an inclinometer.</p>", "<p>The western and central waters of Torres Strait north of 11°S were surveyed between the 10th and 13th of November 1996 using two suryey crews on two Partenavia 688 aircraft to minimise the chance of the population estimates being confounded by local movements of dugongs within the survey period. As in the 1987 and 1991 surveys, the area was divided into eight blocks on the basis of sampling intensity and transect placement. Transects were aligned in an east-west direction south of Buro (Tumagain) Island (9° 34'S, 142° 18'E), and north-south along the coast of Papua New Guinea. Transect lines were spaced 5' apart in Blocks 0, 1B, 3 and 4; and at intervals of 2.5' in Blocks 1A, 2A, 2B and 5. The survey design was determined by: (1) the boundariesof Austalian air space, (2) the known distribution of suitable dugong habitat, (3) the enduance of the aircraft from Horn Island, the only site in Austalian territory itr the region where aircraft fuel could be purchased, and (4) the aircraft time available for the survey. The design was the same as that used in the previous surveys except that: (1) of the seven eastern most transects in Block 1A, the two short transects were not flown and the remaining five were truncated at 9°10'S because we were unable to enter Papua New Guinea air space close to Daru, and (2) as in 1991, the survey intensity in Blocks 0 ard 1B was halved from that used in 1987 by increasing the interval between successive transects from 2.5' in 1987 to 5'. A total of 30,568 km² were surveyed in 1996. A global positioning system mounted in the aircraft facilitated prccise and accuste navigation. The aircmfl was frtted with a ladar altimeterfor accurateheight control. In order to increase repeatability,the survey was conducted only when the weather conditions were good (usually Beaufort sea State ≤ 3). Whenever possible, daily schedules were arranged to avoid severe glare associated with a low or midday sun. Block areas were estimated from 1:100,000 digitised topographic coverage (AUSLIG) using the ArcInfo GIS package. The areas of all islands were excluded from the block areas. The length of each transect was also estimated from these digitised maps. Survey methodology As in 1987 and 1991, we used the strip transect aerial survey methodology as detailed by Marsh and Sincair (1989a and b) andMarsh and Saalfeld(1989b) We chose to continue using this methodology rather than the line transect methods now routinely used for dolphin surveys(eg. Barlow et al. 1997) because: (1) consistent methodology is essential to a reliable time series,(2) Marsh and Saalfeld (1990) verified that the strip width used is sufficiently narrow to preclude detectable variation in dugong sightability across the transect, and (3) dugongs are generally more difficult to sight than dolphins. Dugongs are most often seen as solitary individuals or adult female-calf pairs in turbid water and exhibit cryptic surfacing behaviour.We therefore preferred to use a technique in which the observers do not have to take their eyes off the water to read an inclinometer. </p>", ""] Dugong aerial survey (dugong, cetacean, turtle) Torres Strait, November 2005 fascinator 63393d70a31bfcb385d475f3226459c3 2019-03-15T12:53:47Z ["brief", "note", "note", "note", "full", "<p>Sighting for dugongs, cetaceans and turtles in Torres Strait area during the dugong aerials surveys in November 2005.</p>", "<p>Sighting for dugongs, cetaceans and turtles in Torres Strait area during the dugong aerials surveys in November 2005.</p>", "<p>Funding for these surveys was obtained from the following government agencies: - Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority (GBRMPA), - Department of Environment and Resource Management (DERM), - Australian Marine Mammal Centre (AMMC), - Torres Strait Regional Authority (TSRA), - Australian Fisheries Management Authority (AFMA), - Marine and Tropical Sciences Research Facility (MTSRF), - National Environmental Research Program (NERP).</p>", "<p>Funding for these surveys was obtained from the following government agencies: - Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority (GBRMPA), - Department of Environment and Resource Management (DERM), - Australian Marine Mammal Centre (AMMC), - Torres Strait Regional Authority (TSRA), - Australian Fisheries Management Authority (AFMA), - Marine and Tropical Sciences Research Facility (MTSRF), - National Environmental Research Program (NERP).</p>", "<p>This dataset consists of abundance/distribution and transect maps (jpg) and additional metadata (pdf).</p>", "<p>This dataset consists of abundance/distribution and transect maps (jpg) and additional metadata (pdf).</p>", "<p>Please contact Helene Marsh Helene.Marsh@jcu.edu.au for GIS data.</p>", "<p>Please contact Helene Marsh Helene.Marsh@jcu.edu.au for GIS data.</p>", ""] ["brief", "note", "note", "note", "full", "<p>Sighting for dugongs, cetaceans and turtles in Torres Strait area during the dugong aerials surveys in November 2005.</p>", "<p>Sighting for dugongs, cetaceans and turtles in Torres Strait area during the dugong aerials surveys in November 2005.</p>", "<p>Funding for these surveys was obtained from the following government agencies: - Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority (GBRMPA), - Department of Environment and Resource Management (DERM), - Australian Marine Mammal Centre (AMMC), - Torres Strait Regional Authority (TSRA), - Australian Fisheries Management Authority (AFMA), - Marine and Tropical Sciences Research Facility (MTSRF), - National Environmental Research Program (NERP).</p>", "<p>Funding for these surveys was obtained from the following government agencies: - Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority (GBRMPA), - Department of Environment and Resource Management (DERM), - Australian Marine Mammal Centre (AMMC), - Torres Strait Regional Authority (TSRA), - Australian Fisheries Management Authority (AFMA), - Marine and Tropical Sciences Research Facility (MTSRF), - National Environmental Research Program (NERP).</p>", "<p>This dataset consists of abundance/distribution and transect maps (jpg) and additional metadata (pdf).</p>", "<p>This dataset consists of abundance/distribution and transect maps (jpg) and additional metadata (pdf).</p>", "<p>Please contact Helene Marsh Helene.Marsh@jcu.edu.au for GIS data.</p>", "<p>Please contact Helene Marsh Helene.Marsh@jcu.edu.au for GIS data.</p>", ""] Dugong aerial survey (dugong, cetacean, turtle) Torres Strait, November 2006 fascinator 2cf964ebcfcc511e15b2ef6065ffc3d6 2019-03-15T12:58:49Z ["brief", "note", "note", "full", "full", "<p>Sighting for dugongs, cetaceans, turtles in Torres Strait area during the dugong aerials surveys in November 2006.</p>", "<p>Sighting for dugongs, cetaceans, turtles in Torres Strait area during the dugong aerials surveys in November 2006.</p>", "<p>Funding for these surveys was obtained from the following government agencies: - Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority (GBRMPA), - Department of Environment and Resource Management (DERM), - Australian Marine Mammal Centre (AMMC), - Torres Strait Regional Authority (TSRA), - Australian Fisheries Management Authority (AFMA), - Marine and Tropical Sciences Research Facility (MTSRF), - National Environmental Research Program (NERP).</p>", "<p>Funding for these surveys was obtained from the following government agencies: - Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority (GBRMPA), - Department of Environment and Resource Management (DERM), - Australian Marine Mammal Centre (AMMC), - Torres Strait Regional Authority (TSRA), - Australian Fisheries Management Authority (AFMA), - Marine and Tropical Sciences Research Facility (MTSRF), - National Environmental Research Program (NERP).</p>", "<p>This dataset consists of abundance/distribution and transect maps (jpg), additional metadata (pdf) and a report (pdf). Please contact Helene Marsh (Helene.Marsh@jcu.edu.au) for GIS data.</p>", "<p>This dataset consists of abundance/distribution and transect maps (jpg), additional metadata (pdf) and a report (pdf). Please contact Helene Marsh (Helene.Marsh@jcu.edu.au) for GIS data.</p>", ""] ["brief", "note", "note", "full", "full", "<p>Sighting for dugongs, cetaceans, turtles in Torres Strait area during the dugong aerials surveys in November 2006.</p>", "<p>Sighting for dugongs, cetaceans, turtles in Torres Strait area during the dugong aerials surveys in November 2006.</p>", "<p>Funding for these surveys was obtained from the following government agencies: - Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority (GBRMPA), - Department of Environment and Resource Management (DERM), - Australian Marine Mammal Centre (AMMC), - Torres Strait Regional Authority (TSRA), - Australian Fisheries Management Authority (AFMA), - Marine and Tropical Sciences Research Facility (MTSRF), - National Environmental Research Program (NERP).</p>", "<p>Funding for these surveys was obtained from the following government agencies: - Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority (GBRMPA), - Department of Environment and Resource Management (DERM), - Australian Marine Mammal Centre (AMMC), - Torres Strait Regional Authority (TSRA), - Australian Fisheries Management Authority (AFMA), - Marine and Tropical Sciences Research Facility (MTSRF), - National Environmental Research Program (NERP).</p>", "<p>This dataset consists of abundance/distribution and transect maps (jpg), additional metadata (pdf) and a report (pdf). Please contact Helene Marsh (Helene.Marsh@jcu.edu.au) for GIS data.</p>", "<p>This dataset consists of abundance/distribution and transect maps (jpg), additional metadata (pdf) and a report (pdf). Please contact Helene Marsh (Helene.Marsh@jcu.edu.au) for GIS data.</p>", ""] Dugong aerial survey (dugong, turtle) Torres Strait, December 1994 fascinator fc31a1fe30cb6073743abdd90a5b83e7 2019-03-15T12:55:06Z ["brief", "note", "note", "full", "full", "<p>Sightings for dugongs and turtles in Torres Strait area during the dugong aerials surveys in December 1994.</p>", "<p>Sightings for dugongs and turtles in Torres Strait area during the dugong aerials surveys in December 1994.</p>", "<p>Funding for these surveys was obtained from the following government agencies - Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority (GBRMPA), - Department of Environment and Resource Management (DERM), - Australian Marine Mammal Centre (AMMC), - Torres Strait Regional Authority (TSRA), - Australian Fisheries Management Authority (AFMA), - Marine and Tropical Sciences Research Facility (MTSRF), - National Environmental Research Program (NERP).</p>", "<p>Funding for these surveys was obtained from the following government agencies - Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority (GBRMPA), - Department of Environment and Resource Management (DERM), - Australian Marine Mammal Centre (AMMC), - Torres Strait Regional Authority (TSRA), - Australian Fisheries Management Authority (AFMA), - Marine and Tropical Sciences Research Facility (MTSRF), - National Environmental Research Program (NERP).</p>", "<p>This dataset consists of abundance/distribution and transect maps (jpg) and additional metadata (pdf). Please contact Helene Marsh Helene.Marsh@jcu.edu.au for GIS data.</p>", "<p>This dataset consists of abundance/distribution and transect maps (jpg) and additional metadata (pdf). Please contact Helene Marsh Helene.Marsh@jcu.edu.au for GIS data.</p>", ""] ["brief", "note", "note", "full", "full", "<p>Sightings for dugongs and turtles in Torres Strait area during the dugong aerials surveys in December 1994.</p>", "<p>Sightings for dugongs and turtles in Torres Strait area during the dugong aerials surveys in December 1994.</p>", "<p>Funding for these surveys was obtained from the following government agencies - Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority (GBRMPA), - Department of Environment and Resource Management (DERM), - Australian Marine Mammal Centre (AMMC), - Torres Strait Regional Authority (TSRA), - Australian Fisheries Management Authority (AFMA), - Marine and Tropical Sciences Research Facility (MTSRF), - National Environmental Research Program (NERP).</p>", "<p>Funding for these surveys was obtained from the following government agencies - Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority (GBRMPA), - Department of Environment and Resource Management (DERM), - Australian Marine Mammal Centre (AMMC), - Torres Strait Regional Authority (TSRA), - Australian Fisheries Management Authority (AFMA), - Marine and Tropical Sciences Research Facility (MTSRF), - National Environmental Research Program (NERP).</p>", "<p>This dataset consists of abundance/distribution and transect maps (jpg) and additional metadata (pdf). Please contact Helene Marsh Helene.Marsh@jcu.edu.au for GIS data.</p>", "<p>This dataset consists of abundance/distribution and transect maps (jpg) and additional metadata (pdf). Please contact Helene Marsh Helene.Marsh@jcu.edu.au for GIS data.</p>", ""] Dugong aerial survey (dugongs) Hervey Bay, August 1988 fascinator d82fe1258e6084e6b4cbd637607fbabe 2019-03-15T12:54:54Z ["brief", "full", "note", "full", "<p>Sightings for dugongs in Hervey Bay area during the dugong aerial surveys in August 1988.</p>", "<p>Sightings for dugongs in Hervey Bay area during the dugong aerial surveys in August 1988.</p>", "<p>We conducted dedicated aerial surveys to determine the distribution and abundance of dugongs in Hervey Bay and the Great Sandy Strait in August 1988, November 1992 and December 1993. The methods followed those of Marsh and Sinclair (1989a, 1989b) and Marsh and Saalfeld (1989). Sightings were recorded in a strip 200 m wide on each side of the aircraft, from an altitude of 137 m. Two isolated, independent observers were used on each side of the aircraft so factors could be derived to correct for the dugongs visible, but missed by observers [based on a mark-recapture analysis of sightings (perception-bias correction factor: Marsh and Saalfeld 1989). Results were standardised to correct for dugongs not at the surface at the time the plane passed over (availability-bias correction factor; Marsh and Sinclair 1989b). The same parallel, east-west-oriented transects were flown on each survey, except that the number of transects in Block 1 (Great Sandy Strait) was doubled for 1992 and 1993. This increased the survey intensity in this block from 9.6% in 1988 to 17% and 16.4% in 1992 and 1993, respectively. Surveys were conducted only under good weather conditions (Beaufort sea state ≤ 3), and we avoided flying during periods of severe glare (early morning, late afternoon and midday). The 1992 and 1993 surveys of the Great Sandy Strait were timed to coincide with high tide over most of the area. As the transects were of variable length, the ratio method was used to estimate the density, population size and associated standard errors for each block. The standard errors were adjusted to incorporate the error associated with each correction factor, as outlined in Marsh and Sinclair (1989a). The significance of the differences between the dedicated dugong surveys of Hervey Bay conducted in 1988, 1992 and 1993 was tested by ANOVA both with and without the modal Beaufort sea state for each transect as the covariate. Blocks and times were treated as fixed factors and transect as a random factor nested within block. Input data for all analyses were corrected densities km-2, based on mean group sizes and the estimates of the correction factors for perception and availability bias, each line contributing one density per survey based on the combined corrected counts of both tandem observer teams. The densities were transformed [log10 (x+l)] for analysis, to equalise the error variances.</p>", "<p>We conducted dedicated aerial surveys to determine the distribution and abundance of dugongs in Hervey Bay and the Great Sandy Strait in August 1988, November 1992 and December 1993. The methods followed those of Marsh and Sinclair (1989a, 1989b) and Marsh and Saalfeld (1989). Sightings were recorded in a strip 200 m wide on each side of the aircraft, from an altitude of 137 m. Two isolated, independent observers were used on each side of the aircraft so factors could be derived to correct for the dugongs visible, but missed by observers [based on a mark-recapture analysis of sightings (perception-bias correction factor: Marsh and Saalfeld 1989). Results were standardised to correct for dugongs not at the surface at the time the plane passed over (availability-bias correction factor; Marsh and Sinclair 1989b). The same parallel, east-west-oriented transects were flown on each survey, except that the number of transects in Block 1 (Great Sandy Strait) was doubled for 1992 and 1993. This increased the survey intensity in this block from 9.6% in 1988 to 17% and 16.4% in 1992 and 1993, respectively. Surveys were conducted only under good weather conditions (Beaufort sea state ≤ 3), and we avoided flying during periods of severe glare (early morning, late afternoon and midday). The 1992 and 1993 surveys of the Great Sandy Strait were timed to coincide with high tide over most of the area. As the transects were of variable length, the ratio method was used to estimate the density, population size and associated standard errors for each block. The standard errors were adjusted to incorporate the error associated with each correction factor, as outlined in Marsh and Sinclair (1989a). The significance of the differences between the dedicated dugong surveys of Hervey Bay conducted in 1988, 1992 and 1993 was tested by ANOVA both with and without the modal Beaufort sea state for each transect as the covariate. Blocks and times were treated as fixed factors and transect as a random factor nested within block. Input data for all analyses were corrected densities km-2, based on mean group sizes and the estimates of the correction factors for perception and availability bias, each line contributing one density per survey based on the combined corrected counts of both tandem observer teams. The densities were transformed [log10 (x+l)] for analysis, to equalise the error variances.</p>", "<p>Please contact Helene Marsh Helene.Marsh@jcu.edu.au for GIS data. Funding for these surveys was obtained from the following government agencies: - Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority (GBRMPA), - Department of Environment and Resource Management (DERM), - Australian Marine Mammal Centre (AMMC), - Torres Strait Regional Authority (TSRA), - Australian Fisheries Management Authority (AFMA), - Marine and Tropical Sciences Research Facility (MTSRF), - National Environmental Research Program (NERP).</p>", "<p>Please contact Helene Marsh Helene.Marsh@jcu.edu.au for GIS data. Funding for these surveys was obtained from the following government agencies: - Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority (GBRMPA), - Department of Environment and Resource Management (DERM), - Australian Marine Mammal Centre (AMMC), - Torres Strait Regional Authority (TSRA), - Australian Fisheries Management Authority (AFMA), - Marine and Tropical Sciences Research Facility (MTSRF), - National Environmental Research Program (NERP).</p>", ""] ["brief", "full", "note", "full", "<p>Sightings for dugongs in Hervey Bay area during the dugong aerial surveys in August 1988.</p>", "<p>Sightings for dugongs in Hervey Bay area during the dugong aerial surveys in August 1988.</p>", "<p>We conducted dedicated aerial surveys to determine the distribution and abundance of dugongs in Hervey Bay and the Great Sandy Strait in August 1988, November 1992 and December 1993. The methods followed those of Marsh and Sinclair (1989a, 1989b) and Marsh and Saalfeld (1989). Sightings were recorded in a strip 200 m wide on each side of the aircraft, from an altitude of 137 m. Two isolated, independent observers were used on each side of the aircraft so factors could be derived to correct for the dugongs visible, but missed by observers [based on a mark-recapture analysis of sightings (perception-bias correction factor: Marsh and Saalfeld 1989). Results were standardised to correct for dugongs not at the surface at the time the plane passed over (availability-bias correction factor; Marsh and Sinclair 1989b). The same parallel, east-west-oriented transects were flown on each survey, except that the number of transects in Block 1 (Great Sandy Strait) was doubled for 1992 and 1993. This increased the survey intensity in this block from 9.6% in 1988 to 17% and 16.4% in 1992 and 1993, respectively. Surveys were conducted only under good weather conditions (Beaufort sea state ≤ 3), and we avoided flying during periods of severe glare (early morning, late afternoon and midday). The 1992 and 1993 surveys of the Great Sandy Strait were timed to coincide with high tide over most of the area. As the transects were of variable length, the ratio method was used to estimate the density, population size and associated standard errors for each block. The standard errors were adjusted to incorporate the error associated with each correction factor, as outlined in Marsh and Sinclair (1989a). The significance of the differences between the dedicated dugong surveys of Hervey Bay conducted in 1988, 1992 and 1993 was tested by ANOVA both with and without the modal Beaufort sea state for each transect as the covariate. Blocks and times were treated as fixed factors and transect as a random factor nested within block. Input data for all analyses were corrected densities km-2, based on mean group sizes and the estimates of the correction factors for perception and availability bias, each line contributing one density per survey based on the combined corrected counts of both tandem observer teams. The densities were transformed [log10 (x+l)] for analysis, to equalise the error variances.</p>", "<p>We conducted dedicated aerial surveys to determine the distribution and abundance of dugongs in Hervey Bay and the Great Sandy Strait in August 1988, November 1992 and December 1993. The methods followed those of Marsh and Sinclair (1989a, 1989b) and Marsh and Saalfeld (1989). Sightings were recorded in a strip 200 m wide on each side of the aircraft, from an altitude of 137 m. Two isolated, independent observers were used on each side of the aircraft so factors could be derived to correct for the dugongs visible, but missed by observers [based on a mark-recapture analysis of sightings (perception-bias correction factor: Marsh and Saalfeld 1989). Results were standardised to correct for dugongs not at the surface at the time the plane passed over (availability-bias correction factor; Marsh and Sinclair 1989b). The same parallel, east-west-oriented transects were flown on each survey, except that the number of transects in Block 1 (Great Sandy Strait) was doubled for 1992 and 1993. This increased the survey intensity in this block from 9.6% in 1988 to 17% and 16.4% in 1992 and 1993, respectively. Surveys were conducted only under good weather conditions (Beaufort sea state ≤ 3), and we avoided flying during periods of severe glare (early morning, late afternoon and midday). The 1992 and 1993 surveys of the Great Sandy Strait were timed to coincide with high tide over most of the area. As the transects were of variable length, the ratio method was used to estimate the density, population size and associated standard errors for each block. The standard errors were adjusted to incorporate the error associated with each correction factor, as outlined in Marsh and Sinclair (1989a). The significance of the differences between the dedicated dugong surveys of Hervey Bay conducted in 1988, 1992 and 1993 was tested by ANOVA both with and without the modal Beaufort sea state for each transect as the covariate. Blocks and times were treated as fixed factors and transect as a random factor nested within block. Input data for all analyses were corrected densities km-2, based on mean group sizes and the estimates of the correction factors for perception and availability bias, each line contributing one density per survey based on the combined corrected counts of both tandem observer teams. The densities were transformed [log10 (x+l)] for analysis, to equalise the error variances.</p>", "<p>Please contact Helene Marsh Helene.Marsh@jcu.edu.au for GIS data. Funding for these surveys was obtained from the following government agencies: - Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority (GBRMPA), - Department of Environment and Resource Management (DERM), - Australian Marine Mammal Centre (AMMC), - Torres Strait Regional Authority (TSRA), - Australian Fisheries Management Authority (AFMA), - Marine and Tropical Sciences Research Facility (MTSRF), - National Environmental Research Program (NERP).</p>", "<p>Please contact Helene Marsh Helene.Marsh@jcu.edu.au for GIS data. Funding for these surveys was obtained from the following government agencies: - Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority (GBRMPA), - Department of Environment and Resource Management (DERM), - Australian Marine Mammal Centre (AMMC), - Torres Strait Regional Authority (TSRA), - Australian Fisheries Management Authority (AFMA), - Marine and Tropical Sciences Research Facility (MTSRF), - National Environmental Research Program (NERP).</p>", ""] Dugong aerial survey (dugongs) Hervey Bay, December 1993 fascinator f3828bd940e1212b979fe3bca676beb7 2019-03-15T12:54:43Z ["brief", "full", "note", "full", "<p>Sightings for dugongs in Hervey Bay area during the dugong aerial surveys in December 1993.</p>", "<p>Sightings for dugongs in Hervey Bay area during the dugong aerial surveys in December 1993.</p>", "<p>We conducted dedicated aerial surveys to determine the distribution and abundance of dugongs in Hervey Bay and the Great Sandy Strait in August 1988, November 1992 and December 1993. The methods followed those of Marsh and Sinclair (1989a, 1989b) and Marsh and Saalfeld (1989). Sightings were recorded in a strip 200 m wide on each side of the aircraft, from an altitude of 137 m. Two isolated, independent observers were used on each side of the aircraft so factors could be derived to correct for the dugongs visible, but missed by observers [based on a mark-recapture analysis of sightings (perception-bias correction factor: Marsh and Saalfeld 1989). Results were standardised to correct for dugongs not at the surface at the time the plane passed over (availability-bias correction factor; Marsh and Sinclair 1989b). The same parallel, east-west-oriented transects were flown on each survey, except that the number of transects in Block 1 (Great Sandy Strait) was doubled for 1992 and 1993. This increased the survey intensity in this block from 9.6% in 1988 to 17% and 16.4% in 1992 and 1993, respectively. Surveys were conducted only under good weather conditions (Beaufort sea state ≤ 3), and we avoided flying during periods of severe glare (early morning, late afternoon and midday). The 1992 and 1993 surveys of the Great Sandy Strait were timed to coincide with high tide over most of the area. As the transects were of variable length, the ratio method was used to estimate the density, population size and associated standard errors for each block. The standard errors were adjusted to incorporate the error associated with each correction factor, as outlined in Marsh and Sinclair (1989a). The significance of the differences between the dedicated dugong surveys of Hervey Bay conducted in 1988, 1992 and 1993 was tested by ANOVA both with and without the modal Beaufort sea state for each transect as the covariate. Blocks and times were treated as fixed factors and transect as a random factor nested within block. Input data for all analyses were corrected densities km-2, based on mean group sizes and the estimates of the correction factors for perception and availability bias, each line contributing one density per survey based on the combined corrected counts of both tandem observer teams. The densities were transformed [log10 (x+l)] for analysis, to equalise the error variances.</p>", "<p>We conducted dedicated aerial surveys to determine the distribution and abundance of dugongs in Hervey Bay and the Great Sandy Strait in August 1988, November 1992 and December 1993. The methods followed those of Marsh and Sinclair (1989a, 1989b) and Marsh and Saalfeld (1989). Sightings were recorded in a strip 200 m wide on each side of the aircraft, from an altitude of 137 m. Two isolated, independent observers were used on each side of the aircraft so factors could be derived to correct for the dugongs visible, but missed by observers [based on a mark-recapture analysis of sightings (perception-bias correction factor: Marsh and Saalfeld 1989). Results were standardised to correct for dugongs not at the surface at the time the plane passed over (availability-bias correction factor; Marsh and Sinclair 1989b). The same parallel, east-west-oriented transects were flown on each survey, except that the number of transects in Block 1 (Great Sandy Strait) was doubled for 1992 and 1993. This increased the survey intensity in this block from 9.6% in 1988 to 17% and 16.4% in 1992 and 1993, respectively. Surveys were conducted only under good weather conditions (Beaufort sea state ≤ 3), and we avoided flying during periods of severe glare (early morning, late afternoon and midday). The 1992 and 1993 surveys of the Great Sandy Strait were timed to coincide with high tide over most of the area. As the transects were of variable length, the ratio method was used to estimate the density, population size and associated standard errors for each block. The standard errors were adjusted to incorporate the error associated with each correction factor, as outlined in Marsh and Sinclair (1989a). The significance of the differences between the dedicated dugong surveys of Hervey Bay conducted in 1988, 1992 and 1993 was tested by ANOVA both with and without the modal Beaufort sea state for each transect as the covariate. Blocks and times were treated as fixed factors and transect as a random factor nested within block. Input data for all analyses were corrected densities km-2, based on mean group sizes and the estimates of the correction factors for perception and availability bias, each line contributing one density per survey based on the combined corrected counts of both tandem observer teams. The densities were transformed [log10 (x+l)] for analysis, to equalise the error variances.</p>", "<p>Please contact Helene Marsh Helene.Marsh@jcu.edu.au for GIS data. Funding for these surveys was obtained from the following government agencies: - Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority (GBRMPA), - Department of Environment and Resource Management (DERM), - Australian Marine Mammal Centre (AMMC), - Torres Strait Regional Authority (TSRA), - Australian Fisheries Management Authority (AFMA), - Marine and Tropical Sciences Research Facility (MTSRF), - National Environmental Research Program (NERP).</p>", "<p>Please contact Helene Marsh Helene.Marsh@jcu.edu.au for GIS data. Funding for these surveys was obtained from the following government agencies: - Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority (GBRMPA), - Department of Environment and Resource Management (DERM), - Australian Marine Mammal Centre (AMMC), - Torres Strait Regional Authority (TSRA), - Australian Fisheries Management Authority (AFMA), - Marine and Tropical Sciences Research Facility (MTSRF), - National Environmental Research Program (NERP).</p>", ""] ["brief", "full", "note", "full", "<p>Sightings for dugongs in Hervey Bay area during the dugong aerial surveys in December 1993.</p>", "<p>Sightings for dugongs in Hervey Bay area during the dugong aerial surveys in December 1993.</p>", "<p>We conducted dedicated aerial surveys to determine the distribution and abundance of dugongs in Hervey Bay and the Great Sandy Strait in August 1988, November 1992 and December 1993. The methods followed those of Marsh and Sinclair (1989a, 1989b) and Marsh and Saalfeld (1989). Sightings were recorded in a strip 200 m wide on each side of the aircraft, from an altitude of 137 m. Two isolated, independent observers were used on each side of the aircraft so factors could be derived to correct for the dugongs visible, but missed by observers [based on a mark-recapture analysis of sightings (perception-bias correction factor: Marsh and Saalfeld 1989). Results were standardised to correct for dugongs not at the surface at the time the plane passed over (availability-bias correction factor; Marsh and Sinclair 1989b). The same parallel, east-west-oriented transects were flown on each survey, except that the number of transects in Block 1 (Great Sandy Strait) was doubled for 1992 and 1993. This increased the survey intensity in this block from 9.6% in 1988 to 17% and 16.4% in 1992 and 1993, respectively. Surveys were conducted only under good weather conditions (Beaufort sea state ≤ 3), and we avoided flying during periods of severe glare (early morning, late afternoon and midday). The 1992 and 1993 surveys of the Great Sandy Strait were timed to coincide with high tide over most of the area. As the transects were of variable length, the ratio method was used to estimate the density, population size and associated standard errors for each block. The standard errors were adjusted to incorporate the error associated with each correction factor, as outlined in Marsh and Sinclair (1989a). The significance of the differences between the dedicated dugong surveys of Hervey Bay conducted in 1988, 1992 and 1993 was tested by ANOVA both with and without the modal Beaufort sea state for each transect as the covariate. Blocks and times were treated as fixed factors and transect as a random factor nested within block. Input data for all analyses were corrected densities km-2, based on mean group sizes and the estimates of the correction factors for perception and availability bias, each line contributing one density per survey based on the combined corrected counts of both tandem observer teams. The densities were transformed [log10 (x+l)] for analysis, to equalise the error variances.</p>", "<p>We conducted dedicated aerial surveys to determine the distribution and abundance of dugongs in Hervey Bay and the Great Sandy Strait in August 1988, November 1992 and December 1993. The methods followed those of Marsh and Sinclair (1989a, 1989b) and Marsh and Saalfeld (1989). Sightings were recorded in a strip 200 m wide on each side of the aircraft, from an altitude of 137 m. Two isolated, independent observers were used on each side of the aircraft so factors could be derived to correct for the dugongs visible, but missed by observers [based on a mark-recapture analysis of sightings (perception-bias correction factor: Marsh and Saalfeld 1989). Results were standardised to correct for dugongs not at the surface at the time the plane passed over (availability-bias correction factor; Marsh and Sinclair 1989b). The same parallel, east-west-oriented transects were flown on each survey, except that the number of transects in Block 1 (Great Sandy Strait) was doubled for 1992 and 1993. This increased the survey intensity in this block from 9.6% in 1988 to 17% and 16.4% in 1992 and 1993, respectively. Surveys were conducted only under good weather conditions (Beaufort sea state ≤ 3), and we avoided flying during periods of severe glare (early morning, late afternoon and midday). The 1992 and 1993 surveys of the Great Sandy Strait were timed to coincide with high tide over most of the area. As the transects were of variable length, the ratio method was used to estimate the density, population size and associated standard errors for each block. The standard errors were adjusted to incorporate the error associated with each correction factor, as outlined in Marsh and Sinclair (1989a). The significance of the differences between the dedicated dugong surveys of Hervey Bay conducted in 1988, 1992 and 1993 was tested by ANOVA both with and without the modal Beaufort sea state for each transect as the covariate. Blocks and times were treated as fixed factors and transect as a random factor nested within block. Input data for all analyses were corrected densities km-2, based on mean group sizes and the estimates of the correction factors for perception and availability bias, each line contributing one density per survey based on the combined corrected counts of both tandem observer teams. The densities were transformed [log10 (x+l)] for analysis, to equalise the error variances.</p>", "<p>Please contact Helene Marsh Helene.Marsh@jcu.edu.au for GIS data. Funding for these surveys was obtained from the following government agencies: - Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority (GBRMPA), - Department of Environment and Resource Management (DERM), - Australian Marine Mammal Centre (AMMC), - Torres Strait Regional Authority (TSRA), - Australian Fisheries Management Authority (AFMA), - Marine and Tropical Sciences Research Facility (MTSRF), - National Environmental Research Program (NERP).</p>", "<p>Please contact Helene Marsh Helene.Marsh@jcu.edu.au for GIS data. Funding for these surveys was obtained from the following government agencies: - Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority (GBRMPA), - Department of Environment and Resource Management (DERM), - Australian Marine Mammal Centre (AMMC), - Torres Strait Regional Authority (TSRA), - Australian Fisheries Management Authority (AFMA), - Marine and Tropical Sciences Research Facility (MTSRF), - National Environmental Research Program (NERP).</p>", ""] Dugong aerial survey (dugongs) Hervey Bay, November 1992 fascinator f9a1366899ce20b5eb460e892734ce14 2019-03-15T12:56:11Z ["brief", "full", "note", "full", "<p>Sightings for dugongs in Hervey Bay area during the dugong aerials surveys in November 1992.</p>", "<p>Sightings for dugongs in Hervey Bay area during the dugong aerials surveys in November 1992.</p>", "<p>We conducted dedicated aerial surveys to determine the distribution and abundance of dugongs in Hervey Bay and the Great Sandy Strait in August 1988, November 1992 and December 1993. The methods followed those of Marsh and Sinclair (1989a, 1989b) and Marsh and Saalfeld (1989). Sightings were recorded in a strip 200 m wide on each side of the aircraft, from an altitude of 137 m. Two isolated, independent observers were used on each side of the aircraft so factors could be derived to correct for the dugongs visible, but missed by observers [based on a mark-recapture analysis of sightings (perception-bias correction factor: Marsh and Saalfeld 1989). Results were standardised to correct for dugongs not at the surface at the time the plane passed over (availability-bias correction factor; Marsh and Sinclair 1989b). The same parallel, east-west-oriented transects were flown on each survey, except that the number of transects in Block 1 (Great Sandy Strait) was doubled for 1992 and 1993. This increased the survey intensity in this block from 9.6% in 1988 to 17% and 16.4% in 1992 and 1993, respectively. Surveys were conducted only under good weather conditions (Beaufort sea state ≤ 3), and we avoided flying during periods of severe glare (early morning, late afternoon and midday). The 1992 and 1993 surveys of the Great Sandy Strait were timed to coincide with high tide over most of the area. As the transects were of variable length, the ratio method was used to estimate the density, population size and associated standard errors for each block. The standard errors were adjusted to incorporate the error associated with each correction factor, as outlined in Marsh and Sinclair (1989a). The significance of the differences between the dedicated dugong surveys of Hervey Bay conducted in 1988, 1992 and 1993 was tested by ANOVA both with and without the modal Beaufort sea state for each transect as the covariate. Blocks and times were treated as fixed factors and transect as a random factor nested within block. Input data for all analyses were corrected densities km-2, based on mean group sizes and the estimates of the correction factors for perception and availability bias, each line contributing one density per survey based on the combined corrected counts of both tandem observer teams. The densities were transformed [log10 (x+l)] for analysis, to equalise the error variances.</p>", "<p>We conducted dedicated aerial surveys to determine the distribution and abundance of dugongs in Hervey Bay and the Great Sandy Strait in August 1988, November 1992 and December 1993. The methods followed those of Marsh and Sinclair (1989a, 1989b) and Marsh and Saalfeld (1989). Sightings were recorded in a strip 200 m wide on each side of the aircraft, from an altitude of 137 m. Two isolated, independent observers were used on each side of the aircraft so factors could be derived to correct for the dugongs visible, but missed by observers [based on a mark-recapture analysis of sightings (perception-bias correction factor: Marsh and Saalfeld 1989). Results were standardised to correct for dugongs not at the surface at the time the plane passed over (availability-bias correction factor; Marsh and Sinclair 1989b). The same parallel, east-west-oriented transects were flown on each survey, except that the number of transects in Block 1 (Great Sandy Strait) was doubled for 1992 and 1993. This increased the survey intensity in this block from 9.6% in 1988 to 17% and 16.4% in 1992 and 1993, respectively. Surveys were conducted only under good weather conditions (Beaufort sea state ≤ 3), and we avoided flying during periods of severe glare (early morning, late afternoon and midday). The 1992 and 1993 surveys of the Great Sandy Strait were timed to coincide with high tide over most of the area. As the transects were of variable length, the ratio method was used to estimate the density, population size and associated standard errors for each block. The standard errors were adjusted to incorporate the error associated with each correction factor, as outlined in Marsh and Sinclair (1989a). The significance of the differences between the dedicated dugong surveys of Hervey Bay conducted in 1988, 1992 and 1993 was tested by ANOVA both with and without the modal Beaufort sea state for each transect as the covariate. Blocks and times were treated as fixed factors and transect as a random factor nested within block. Input data for all analyses were corrected densities km-2, based on mean group sizes and the estimates of the correction factors for perception and availability bias, each line contributing one density per survey based on the combined corrected counts of both tandem observer teams. The densities were transformed [log10 (x+l)] for analysis, to equalise the error variances.</p>", "<p>Please contact Helene Marsh Helene.Marsh@jcu.edu.au for GIS data. Funding for these surveys was obtained from the following government agencies: - Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority (GBRMPA), - Department of Environment and Resource Management (DERM), - Australian Marine Mammal Centre (AMMC), - Torres Strait Regional Authority (TSRA), - Australian Fisheries Management Authority (AFMA), - Marine and Tropical Sciences Research Facility (MTSRF), - National Environmental Research Program (NERP).</p>", "<p>Please contact Helene Marsh Helene.Marsh@jcu.edu.au for GIS data. Funding for these surveys was obtained from the following government agencies: - Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority (GBRMPA), - Department of Environment and Resource Management (DERM), - Australian Marine Mammal Centre (AMMC), - Torres Strait Regional Authority (TSRA), - Australian Fisheries Management Authority (AFMA), - Marine and Tropical Sciences Research Facility (MTSRF), - National Environmental Research Program (NERP).</p>", ""] ["brief", "full", "note", "full", "<p>Sightings for dugongs in Hervey Bay area during the dugong aerials surveys in November 1992.</p>", "<p>Sightings for dugongs in Hervey Bay area during the dugong aerials surveys in November 1992.</p>", "<p>We conducted dedicated aerial surveys to determine the distribution and abundance of dugongs in Hervey Bay and the Great Sandy Strait in August 1988, November 1992 and December 1993. The methods followed those of Marsh and Sinclair (1989a, 1989b) and Marsh and Saalfeld (1989). Sightings were recorded in a strip 200 m wide on each side of the aircraft, from an altitude of 137 m. Two isolated, independent observers were used on each side of the aircraft so factors could be derived to correct for the dugongs visible, but missed by observers [based on a mark-recapture analysis of sightings (perception-bias correction factor: Marsh and Saalfeld 1989). Results were standardised to correct for dugongs not at the surface at the time the plane passed over (availability-bias correction factor; Marsh and Sinclair 1989b). The same parallel, east-west-oriented transects were flown on each survey, except that the number of transects in Block 1 (Great Sandy Strait) was doubled for 1992 and 1993. This increased the survey intensity in this block from 9.6% in 1988 to 17% and 16.4% in 1992 and 1993, respectively. Surveys were conducted only under good weather conditions (Beaufort sea state ≤ 3), and we avoided flying during periods of severe glare (early morning, late afternoon and midday). The 1992 and 1993 surveys of the Great Sandy Strait were timed to coincide with high tide over most of the area. As the transects were of variable length, the ratio method was used to estimate the density, population size and associated standard errors for each block. The standard errors were adjusted to incorporate the error associated with each correction factor, as outlined in Marsh and Sinclair (1989a). The significance of the differences between the dedicated dugong surveys of Hervey Bay conducted in 1988, 1992 and 1993 was tested by ANOVA both with and without the modal Beaufort sea state for each transect as the covariate. Blocks and times were treated as fixed factors and transect as a random factor nested within block. Input data for all analyses were corrected densities km-2, based on mean group sizes and the estimates of the correction factors for perception and availability bias, each line contributing one density per survey based on the combined corrected counts of both tandem observer teams. The densities were transformed [log10 (x+l)] for analysis, to equalise the error variances.</p>", "<p>We conducted dedicated aerial surveys to determine the distribution and abundance of dugongs in Hervey Bay and the Great Sandy Strait in August 1988, November 1992 and December 1993. The methods followed those of Marsh and Sinclair (1989a, 1989b) and Marsh and Saalfeld (1989). Sightings were recorded in a strip 200 m wide on each side of the aircraft, from an altitude of 137 m. Two isolated, independent observers were used on each side of the aircraft so factors could be derived to correct for the dugongs visible, but missed by observers [based on a mark-recapture analysis of sightings (perception-bias correction factor: Marsh and Saalfeld 1989). Results were standardised to correct for dugongs not at the surface at the time the plane passed over (availability-bias correction factor; Marsh and Sinclair 1989b). The same parallel, east-west-oriented transects were flown on each survey, except that the number of transects in Block 1 (Great Sandy Strait) was doubled for 1992 and 1993. This increased the survey intensity in this block from 9.6% in 1988 to 17% and 16.4% in 1992 and 1993, respectively. Surveys were conducted only under good weather conditions (Beaufort sea state ≤ 3), and we avoided flying during periods of severe glare (early morning, late afternoon and midday). The 1992 and 1993 surveys of the Great Sandy Strait were timed to coincide with high tide over most of the area. As the transects were of variable length, the ratio method was used to estimate the density, population size and associated standard errors for each block. The standard errors were adjusted to incorporate the error associated with each correction factor, as outlined in Marsh and Sinclair (1989a). The significance of the differences between the dedicated dugong surveys of Hervey Bay conducted in 1988, 1992 and 1993 was tested by ANOVA both with and without the modal Beaufort sea state for each transect as the covariate. Blocks and times were treated as fixed factors and transect as a random factor nested within block. Input data for all analyses were corrected densities km-2, based on mean group sizes and the estimates of the correction factors for perception and availability bias, each line contributing one density per survey based on the combined corrected counts of both tandem observer teams. The densities were transformed [log10 (x+l)] for analysis, to equalise the error variances.</p>", "<p>Please contact Helene Marsh Helene.Marsh@jcu.edu.au for GIS data. Funding for these surveys was obtained from the following government agencies: - Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority (GBRMPA), - Department of Environment and Resource Management (DERM), - Australian Marine Mammal Centre (AMMC), - Torres Strait Regional Authority (TSRA), - Australian Fisheries Management Authority (AFMA), - Marine and Tropical Sciences Research Facility (MTSRF), - National Environmental Research Program (NERP).</p>", "<p>Please contact Helene Marsh Helene.Marsh@jcu.edu.au for GIS data. Funding for these surveys was obtained from the following government agencies: - Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority (GBRMPA), - Department of Environment and Resource Management (DERM), - Australian Marine Mammal Centre (AMMC), - Torres Strait Regional Authority (TSRA), - Australian Fisheries Management Authority (AFMA), - Marine and Tropical Sciences Research Facility (MTSRF), - National Environmental Research Program (NERP).</p>", ""] Dugong aerial survey (dugongs) Hervey Bay, between October and December 1999 fascinator 42e1b37cceff32f1b38f5cd811baeb4a 2019-03-15T12:58:50Z ["<p>Sightings for dugongs in Hervey Bay area during the dugong aerials surveys between October and December 1999.</p>", "<p>Sightings for dugongs in Hervey Bay area during the dugong aerials surveys between October and December 1999.</p>", "brief", "<p>The survey period was characterised by unseasonally poor weather, and opportunities to survey under suitable conditions were limited. For this reason, the survey coverage was incomplete, with the focus directed towards high quality habitats at the expense of regions where few or no dugongs have been recorded in previous surveys. This resulted in the omission of the region between Cape Bedford and Innisfail, part of the coastline south of Mackay, including Broad Sound, the coast between Hervey Bay and Moreton Bay, and three of six blocks in Moreton Bay. The results of the 1999 survey indicate that dugong numbers in both the southern GBR and Hervey Bay regions in October–December 1999 were significantly higher than thecorresponding estimate in 1994, but not significantly different from that obtained in 1986–1987. Most of the increase was in the northern part of the survey region (the Central Section of the GBR).</p>", "<p>The survey period was characterised by unseasonally poor weather, and opportunities to survey under suitable conditions were limited. For this reason, the survey coverage was incomplete, with the focus directed towards high quality habitats at the expense of regions where few or no dugongs have been recorded in previous surveys. This resulted in the omission of the region between Cape Bedford and Innisfail, part of the coastline south of Mackay, including Broad Sound, the coast between Hervey Bay and Moreton Bay, and three of six blocks in Moreton Bay. The results of the 1999 survey indicate that dugong numbers in both the southern GBR and Hervey Bay regions in October–December 1999 were significantly higher than thecorresponding estimate in 1994, but not significantly different from that obtained in 1986–1987. Most of the increase was in the northern part of the survey region (the Central Section of the GBR).</p>", "full", "<p>Please contact Helene Marsh Helene.Marsh@jcu.edu.au for GIS data. Funding for these surveys was obtained from the following government agencies: - Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority (GBRMPA), - Department of Environment and Resource Management (DERM), - Australian Marine Mammal Centre (AMMC), - Torres Strait Regional Authority (TSRA), - Australian Fisheries Management Authority (AFMA), - Marine and Tropical Sciences Research Facility (MTSRF), - National Environmental Research Program (NERP).</p>", "<p>Please contact Helene Marsh Helene.Marsh@jcu.edu.au for GIS data. Funding for these surveys was obtained from the following government agencies: - Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority (GBRMPA), - Department of Environment and Resource Management (DERM), - Australian Marine Mammal Centre (AMMC), - Torres Strait Regional Authority (TSRA), - Australian Fisheries Management Authority (AFMA), - Marine and Tropical Sciences Research Facility (MTSRF), - National Environmental Research Program (NERP).</p>", "note", "full", ""] ["<p>Sightings for dugongs in Hervey Bay area during the dugong aerials surveys between October and December 1999.</p>", "<p>Sightings for dugongs in Hervey Bay area during the dugong aerials surveys between October and December 1999.</p>", "brief", "<p>The survey period was characterised by unseasonally poor weather, and opportunities to survey under suitable conditions were limited. For this reason, the survey coverage was incomplete, with the focus directed towards high quality habitats at the expense of regions where few or no dugongs have been recorded in previous surveys. This resulted in the omission of the region between Cape Bedford and Innisfail, part of the coastline south of Mackay, including Broad Sound, the coast between Hervey Bay and Moreton Bay, and three of six blocks in Moreton Bay. The results of the 1999 survey indicate that dugong numbers in both the southern GBR and Hervey Bay regions in October–December 1999 were significantly higher than thecorresponding estimate in 1994, but not significantly different from that obtained in 1986–1987. Most of the increase was in the northern part of the survey region (the Central Section of the GBR).</p>", "<p>The survey period was characterised by unseasonally poor weather, and opportunities to survey under suitable conditions were limited. For this reason, the survey coverage was incomplete, with the focus directed towards high quality habitats at the expense of regions where few or no dugongs have been recorded in previous surveys. This resulted in the omission of the region between Cape Bedford and Innisfail, part of the coastline south of Mackay, including Broad Sound, the coast between Hervey Bay and Moreton Bay, and three of six blocks in Moreton Bay. The results of the 1999 survey indicate that dugong numbers in both the southern GBR and Hervey Bay regions in October–December 1999 were significantly higher than thecorresponding estimate in 1994, but not significantly different from that obtained in 1986–1987. Most of the increase was in the northern part of the survey region (the Central Section of the GBR).</p>", "full", "<p>Please contact Helene Marsh Helene.Marsh@jcu.edu.au for GIS data. Funding for these surveys was obtained from the following government agencies: - Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority (GBRMPA), - Department of Environment and Resource Management (DERM), - Australian Marine Mammal Centre (AMMC), - Torres Strait Regional Authority (TSRA), - Australian Fisheries Management Authority (AFMA), - Marine and Tropical Sciences Research Facility (MTSRF), - National Environmental Research Program (NERP).</p>", "<p>Please contact Helene Marsh Helene.Marsh@jcu.edu.au for GIS data. Funding for these surveys was obtained from the following government agencies: - Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority (GBRMPA), - Department of Environment and Resource Management (DERM), - Australian Marine Mammal Centre (AMMC), - Torres Strait Regional Authority (TSRA), - Australian Fisheries Management Authority (AFMA), - Marine and Tropical Sciences Research Facility (MTSRF), - National Environmental Research Program (NERP).</p>", "note", "full", ""] Dugong aerial survey (dugongs) Moreton Bay, October 1999 fascinator 3290e1406ad933e09c77440883b85f00 2019-03-15T12:56:24Z ["brief", "full", "note", "note", "full", "<p>Sightings for dugongs, in Moreton Bay area during the dugong aerials surveys in October 1999.</p>", "<p>Sightings for dugongs, in Moreton Bay area during the dugong aerials surveys in October 1999.</p>", "<p>In response to an outbreak of the potentially toxic algae Lyngbya over the eastern banks of Moreton Bay in March 2000, a series of aerial surveys was planned to asses the effects of future outbreaks on the distribution and abundance of dugongs and other megafauna in Moreton Bay.</p>", "<p>In response to an outbreak of the potentially toxic algae Lyngbya over the eastern banks of Moreton Bay in March 2000, a series of aerial surveys was planned to asses the effects of future outbreaks on the distribution and abundance of dugongs and other megafauna in Moreton Bay.</p>", "<p>Please contact Helene Marsh Helene.Marsh@jcu.edu.au for GIS data. Funding for these surveys was obtained from the following government agencies: - Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority (GBRMPA), - Department of Environment and Resource Management (DERM), - Australian Marine Mammal Centre (AMMC), - Torres Strait Regional Authority (TSRA), - Australian Fisheries Management Authority (AFMA), - Marine and Tropical Sciences Research Facility (MTSRF), - National Environmental Research Program (NERP).</p>", "<p>Please contact Helene Marsh Helene.Marsh@jcu.edu.au for GIS data. Funding for these surveys was obtained from the following government agencies: - Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority (GBRMPA), - Department of Environment and Resource Management (DERM), - Australian Marine Mammal Centre (AMMC), - Torres Strait Regional Authority (TSRA), - Australian Fisheries Management Authority (AFMA), - Marine and Tropical Sciences Research Facility (MTSRF), - National Environmental Research Program (NERP).</p>", "<p>This dataset contains maps and reports.</p>", "<p>This dataset contains maps and reports.</p>", ""] ["brief", "full", "note", "note", "full", "<p>Sightings for dugongs, in Moreton Bay area during the dugong aerials surveys in October 1999.</p>", "<p>Sightings for dugongs, in Moreton Bay area during the dugong aerials surveys in October 1999.</p>", "<p>In response to an outbreak of the potentially toxic algae Lyngbya over the eastern banks of Moreton Bay in March 2000, a series of aerial surveys was planned to asses the effects of future outbreaks on the distribution and abundance of dugongs and other megafauna in Moreton Bay.</p>", "<p>In response to an outbreak of the potentially toxic algae Lyngbya over the eastern banks of Moreton Bay in March 2000, a series of aerial surveys was planned to asses the effects of future outbreaks on the distribution and abundance of dugongs and other megafauna in Moreton Bay.</p>", "<p>Please contact Helene Marsh Helene.Marsh@jcu.edu.au for GIS data. Funding for these surveys was obtained from the following government agencies: - Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority (GBRMPA), - Department of Environment and Resource Management (DERM), - Australian Marine Mammal Centre (AMMC), - Torres Strait Regional Authority (TSRA), - Australian Fisheries Management Authority (AFMA), - Marine and Tropical Sciences Research Facility (MTSRF), - National Environmental Research Program (NERP).</p>", "<p>Please contact Helene Marsh Helene.Marsh@jcu.edu.au for GIS data. Funding for these surveys was obtained from the following government agencies: - Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority (GBRMPA), - Department of Environment and Resource Management (DERM), - Australian Marine Mammal Centre (AMMC), - Torres Strait Regional Authority (TSRA), - Australian Fisheries Management Authority (AFMA), - Marine and Tropical Sciences Research Facility (MTSRF), - National Environmental Research Program (NERP).</p>", "<p>This dataset contains maps and reports.</p>", "<p>This dataset contains maps and reports.</p>", ""] Dugong aerial survey (dugongs, cetaceans and turtles), Gulf of Carpentaria, December 1991 fascinator 25c5d2f5fa406c1d1873f0a0ba15fa3f 2019-03-15T12:53:43Z ["brief", "note", "note", "full", "<p>Sightings for dugongs, cetaceans and turtles in the Gulf of Carpentaria area during the dugong aerial surveys in December 1991.</p>", "<p>Sightings for dugongs, cetaceans and turtles in the Gulf of Carpentaria area during the dugong aerial surveys in December 1991.</p>", "<p>Please contact Helene Marsh Helene.Marsh@jcu.edu.au for GIS data. Funding for these surveys was obtained from the following government agencies: - Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority (GBRMPA), - Department of Environment and Resource Management (DERM), - Australian Marine Mammal Centre (AMMC), - Torres Strait Regional Authority (TSRA), - Australian Fisheries Management Authority (AFMA), - Marine and Tropical Sciences Research Facility (MTSRF), - National Environmental Research Program (NERP).</p>", "<p>Please contact Helene Marsh Helene.Marsh@jcu.edu.au for GIS data. Funding for these surveys was obtained from the following government agencies: - Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority (GBRMPA), - Department of Environment and Resource Management (DERM), - Australian Marine Mammal Centre (AMMC), - Torres Strait Regional Authority (TSRA), - Australian Fisheries Management Authority (AFMA), - Marine and Tropical Sciences Research Facility (MTSRF), - National Environmental Research Program (NERP).</p>", "<p>This dataset includes maps (jpeg) and reports (pdf).</p>", "<p>This dataset includes maps (jpeg) and reports (pdf).</p>", ""] ["brief", "note", "note", "full", "<p>Sightings for dugongs, cetaceans and turtles in the Gulf of Carpentaria area during the dugong aerial surveys in December 1991.</p>", "<p>Sightings for dugongs, cetaceans and turtles in the Gulf of Carpentaria area during the dugong aerial surveys in December 1991.</p>", "<p>Please contact Helene Marsh Helene.Marsh@jcu.edu.au for GIS data. Funding for these surveys was obtained from the following government agencies: - Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority (GBRMPA), - Department of Environment and Resource Management (DERM), - Australian Marine Mammal Centre (AMMC), - Torres Strait Regional Authority (TSRA), - Australian Fisheries Management Authority (AFMA), - Marine and Tropical Sciences Research Facility (MTSRF), - National Environmental Research Program (NERP).</p>", "<p>Please contact Helene Marsh Helene.Marsh@jcu.edu.au for GIS data. Funding for these surveys was obtained from the following government agencies: - Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority (GBRMPA), - Department of Environment and Resource Management (DERM), - Australian Marine Mammal Centre (AMMC), - Torres Strait Regional Authority (TSRA), - Australian Fisheries Management Authority (AFMA), - Marine and Tropical Sciences Research Facility (MTSRF), - National Environmental Research Program (NERP).</p>", "<p>This dataset includes maps (jpeg) and reports (pdf).</p>", "<p>This dataset includes maps (jpeg) and reports (pdf).</p>", ""] Dugong aerial survey (dugongs, cetaceans and turtles), Gulf of Carpentaria, December 1997 fascinator 98382516a114cff5e041929b653910ee 2019-03-15T12:58:08Z ["brief", "note", "note", "full", "<p>Sightings for dugongs, cetaceans and turtles in the Gulf of Carpentaria area during the dugong aerials surveys in December 1997. These data are the results of the first survey of the entire Queensland coastal waters for the Gulf of Carpentaria for marine wildflife using the quantitative aerial survey techniques, which are now standard for dugongs.</p>", "<p>Sightings for dugongs, cetaceans and turtles in the Gulf of Carpentaria area during the dugong aerials surveys in December 1997. These data are the results of the first survey of the entire Queensland coastal waters for the Gulf of Carpentaria for marine wildflife using the quantitative aerial survey techniques, which are now standard for dugongs.</p>", "<p>Please contact Helene Marsh Helene.Marsh@jcu.edu.au for GIS data. Funding for these surveys was obtained from the following government agencies: - Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority (GBRMPA), - Department of Environment and Resource Management (DERM), - Australian Marine Mammal Centre (AMMC), - Torres Strait Regional Authority (TSRA), - Australian Fisheries Management Authority (AFMA), - Marine and Tropical Sciences Research Facility (MTSRF), - National Environmental Research Program (NERP).</p>", "<p>Please contact Helene Marsh Helene.Marsh@jcu.edu.au for GIS data. Funding for these surveys was obtained from the following government agencies: - Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority (GBRMPA), - Department of Environment and Resource Management (DERM), - Australian Marine Mammal Centre (AMMC), - Torres Strait Regional Authority (TSRA), - Australian Fisheries Management Authority (AFMA), - Marine and Tropical Sciences Research Facility (MTSRF), - National Environmental Research Program (NERP).</p>", "<p>This dataset includes maps (jpeg) and reports (pdf).</p>", "<p>This dataset includes maps (jpeg) and reports (pdf).</p>", ""] ["brief", "note", "note", "full", "<p>Sightings for dugongs, cetaceans and turtles in the Gulf of Carpentaria area during the dugong aerials surveys in December 1997. These data are the results of the first survey of the entire Queensland coastal waters for the Gulf of Carpentaria for marine wildflife using the quantitative aerial survey techniques, which are now standard for dugongs.</p>", "<p>Sightings for dugongs, cetaceans and turtles in the Gulf of Carpentaria area during the dugong aerials surveys in December 1997. These data are the results of the first survey of the entire Queensland coastal waters for the Gulf of Carpentaria for marine wildflife using the quantitative aerial survey techniques, which are now standard for dugongs.</p>", "<p>Please contact Helene Marsh Helene.Marsh@jcu.edu.au for GIS data. Funding for these surveys was obtained from the following government agencies: - Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority (GBRMPA), - Department of Environment and Resource Management (DERM), - Australian Marine Mammal Centre (AMMC), - Torres Strait Regional Authority (TSRA), - Australian Fisheries Management Authority (AFMA), - Marine and Tropical Sciences Research Facility (MTSRF), - National Environmental Research Program (NERP).</p>", "<p>Please contact Helene Marsh Helene.Marsh@jcu.edu.au for GIS data. Funding for these surveys was obtained from the following government agencies: - Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority (GBRMPA), - Department of Environment and Resource Management (DERM), - Australian Marine Mammal Centre (AMMC), - Torres Strait Regional Authority (TSRA), - Australian Fisheries Management Authority (AFMA), - Marine and Tropical Sciences Research Facility (MTSRF), - National Environmental Research Program (NERP).</p>", "<p>This dataset includes maps (jpeg) and reports (pdf).</p>", "<p>This dataset includes maps (jpeg) and reports (pdf).</p>", ""] Dugong aerial survey (dugongs, cetaceans and turtles), Gulf of Carpentaria, November 1994 fascinator 2426d7aa3d515d8ae9c856329cbf7ee7 2019-03-15T12:54:30Z ["<p>Sightings for dugongs, cetaceans and turtles in the Gulf of Carpentaria area during the dugong aerials surveys in November 1994.</p>", "<p>Sightings for dugongs, cetaceans and turtles in the Gulf of Carpentaria area during the dugong aerials surveys in November 1994.</p>", "brief", "<p>This dataset includes maps (jpeg) and report: Report on Aerial Survey of Karumba Region for dugongs, dolphins and sea turtles for Century Zinc. Marsh, Lawler and Corkeron, (pdf). Please contact Helene Marsh Helene.Marsh@jcu.edu.au for GIS data. Funding for these surveys was obtained from the following government agencies: Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority (GBRMPA), Department of Environment and Resource Management (DERM), Australian Marine Mammal Centre (AMMC), Torres Strait Regional Authority (TSRA), Australian Fisheries Management Authority (AFMA), Marine and Tropical Sciences Research Facility (MTSRF), National Environmental Research Program (NERP).</p>", "<p>This dataset includes maps (jpeg) and report: Report on Aerial Survey of Karumba Region for dugongs, dolphins and sea turtles for Century Zinc. Marsh, Lawler and Corkeron, (pdf). Please contact Helene Marsh Helene.Marsh@jcu.edu.au for GIS data. Funding for these surveys was obtained from the following government agencies: Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority (GBRMPA), Department of Environment and Resource Management (DERM), Australian Marine Mammal Centre (AMMC), Torres Strait Regional Authority (TSRA), Australian Fisheries Management Authority (AFMA), Marine and Tropical Sciences Research Facility (MTSRF), National Environmental Research Program (NERP).</p>", "note", "full", "full", ""] ["<p>Sightings for dugongs, cetaceans and turtles in the Gulf of Carpentaria area during the dugong aerials surveys in November 1994.</p>", "<p>Sightings for dugongs, cetaceans and turtles in the Gulf of Carpentaria area during the dugong aerials surveys in November 1994.</p>", "brief", "<p>This dataset includes maps (jpeg) and report: Report on Aerial Survey of Karumba Region for dugongs, dolphins and sea turtles for Century Zinc. Marsh, Lawler and Corkeron, (pdf). Please contact Helene Marsh Helene.Marsh@jcu.edu.au for GIS data. Funding for these surveys was obtained from the following government agencies: Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority (GBRMPA), Department of Environment and Resource Management (DERM), Australian Marine Mammal Centre (AMMC), Torres Strait Regional Authority (TSRA), Australian Fisheries Management Authority (AFMA), Marine and Tropical Sciences Research Facility (MTSRF), National Environmental Research Program (NERP).</p>", "<p>This dataset includes maps (jpeg) and report: Report on Aerial Survey of Karumba Region for dugongs, dolphins and sea turtles for Century Zinc. Marsh, Lawler and Corkeron, (pdf). Please contact Helene Marsh Helene.Marsh@jcu.edu.au for GIS data. Funding for these surveys was obtained from the following government agencies: Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority (GBRMPA), Department of Environment and Resource Management (DERM), Australian Marine Mammal Centre (AMMC), Torres Strait Regional Authority (TSRA), Australian Fisheries Management Authority (AFMA), Marine and Tropical Sciences Research Facility (MTSRF), National Environmental Research Program (NERP).</p>", "note", "full", "full", ""]