Published Objects Chi Chi Earthquake Kinematic and Dynamic Analyses fascinator 25a4cd98dc083c136fe0063ef94be6f2 2019-03-15T12:54:03Z ["brief", "The 1999 Chi-Chi earthquake created a 100-km-long surface rupture on the Chelungpu thrust fault in Taiwan due to convergence between the Phillipine Sea and Eurasian plates. Fault slip measurements were made by several researchers from the entire length of the rupture directly following the earthquake and can thus be attributed to a single tectonic event. Conventional fault slip analyses are applied to these data and the results are compared with independent seismological and kinematic observations. Unlike many fault slip analyses, complications due to multiple deformations can be categorically excluded and the results can be evaluated from the seismological and plate movement data. Kinematic analyses of fault slip data that are weighted by displacement show sub-horizontal NW–SE shortening that is parallel to the plate convergence vector. A single fault plane solution satisfies almost all the data. Right dihedra and trihedra solutions also satisfy almost all the surface rupture measurements and give s1 in a NW–SE orientation that is similar to the results of stress inversion and to inversion from earthquakes in the Chi-Chi earthquake sequence. Despite criticisms of fault slip analysis methods, these results show that fault slip analyses from data collected along major faults, which have not witnessed multiple deformation events, can be valid. Homogeneous strain and stress states exist in the sense that kinematic and dynamic solutions can be found that fit essentially all the data, and these solutions have tectonic significance.", "note", "This dataset contains an appendix and three tables (xls and ods format).", "Coinvestigators: None Related JCU Research Themes: Industries and Economies in the Tropics", "<p>The 1999 Chi-Chi earthquake created a 100-km-long surface rupture on the Chelungpu thrust fault in Taiwan due to convergence between the Phillipine Sea and Eurasian plates. Fault slip measurements were made by several researchers from the entire length of the rupture directly following the earthquake and can thus be attributed to a single tectonic event. Conventional fault slip analyses are applied to these data and the results are compared with independent seismological and kinematic observations. Unlike many fault slip analyses, complications due to multiple deformations can be categorically excluded and the results can be evaluated from the seismological and plate movement data. Kinematic analyses of fault slip data that are weighted by displacement show sub-horizontal NW–SE shortening that is parallel to the plate convergence vector. A single fault plane solution satisfies almost all the data. Right dihedra and trihedra solutions also satisfy almost all the surface rupture measurements and give s1 in a NW–SE orientation that is similar to the results of stress inversion and to inversion from earthquakes in the Chi-Chi earthquake sequence. Despite criticisms of fault slip analysis methods, these results show that fault slip analyses from data collected along major faults, which have not witnessed multiple deformation events, can be valid. Homogeneous strain and stress states exist in the sense that kinematic and dynamic solutions can be found that fit essentially all the data, and these solutions have tectonic significance.</p>", "<p>The 1999 Chi-Chi earthquake created a 100-km-long surface rupture on the Chelungpu thrust fault in Taiwan due to convergence between the Phillipine Sea and Eurasian plates. Fault slip measurements were made by several researchers from the entire length of the rupture directly following the earthquake and can thus be attributed to a single tectonic event. Conventional fault slip analyses are applied to these data and the results are compared with independent seismological and kinematic observations. Unlike many fault slip analyses, complications due to multiple deformations can be categorically excluded and the results can be evaluated from the seismological and plate movement data. Kinematic analyses of fault slip data that are weighted by displacement show sub-horizontal NW–SE shortening that is parallel to the plate convergence vector. A single fault plane solution satisfies almost all the data. Right dihedra and trihedra solutions also satisfy almost all the surface rupture measurements and give s1 in a NW–SE orientation that is similar to the results of stress inversion and to inversion from earthquakes in the Chi-Chi earthquake sequence. Despite criticisms of fault slip analysis methods, these results show that fault slip analyses from data collected along major faults, which have not witnessed multiple deformation events, can be valid. Homogeneous strain and stress states exist in the sense that kinematic and dynamic solutions can be found that fit essentially all the data, and these solutions have tectonic significance.</p>", "<p>This dataset contains an appendix and three tables (xls and ods format).</p>", "<p>This dataset contains an appendix and three tables (xls and ods format).</p>", "The 1999 Chi-Chi earthquake created a 100-km-long surface rupture on the Chelungpu thrust fault in Taiwan due to convergence between the Phillipine Sea and Eurasian plates. Fault slip measurements were made by several researchers from the entire length of the rupture directly following the earthquake and can thus be attributed to a single tectonic event. Conventional fault slip analyses are applied to these data and the results are compared with independent seismological and kinematic observations. Unlike many fault slip analyses, complications due to multiple deformations can be categorically excluded and the results can be evaluated from the seismological and plate movement data. Kinematic analyses of fault slip data that are weighted by displacement show sub-horizontal NW–SE shortening that is parallel to the plate convergence vector. A single fault plane solution satisfies almost all the data. Right dihedra and trihedra solutions also satisfy almost all the surface rupture measurements and give s1 in a NW–SE orientation that is similar to the results of stress inversion and to inversion from earthquakes in the Chi-Chi earthquake sequence. Despite criticisms of fault slip analysis methods, these results show that fault slip analyses from data collected along major faults, which have not witnessed multiple deformation events, can be valid. Homogeneous strain and stress states exist in the sense that kinematic and dynamic solutions can be found that fit essentially all the data, and these solutions have tectonic significance."] ["brief", "The 1999 Chi-Chi earthquake created a 100-km-long surface rupture on the Chelungpu thrust fault in Taiwan due to convergence between the Phillipine Sea and Eurasian plates. Fault slip measurements were made by several researchers from the entire length of the rupture directly following the earthquake and can thus be attributed to a single tectonic event. Conventional fault slip analyses are applied to these data and the results are compared with independent seismological and kinematic observations. Unlike many fault slip analyses, complications due to multiple deformations can be categorically excluded and the results can be evaluated from the seismological and plate movement data. Kinematic analyses of fault slip data that are weighted by displacement show sub-horizontal NW–SE shortening that is parallel to the plate convergence vector. A single fault plane solution satisfies almost all the data. Right dihedra and trihedra solutions also satisfy almost all the surface rupture measurements and give s1 in a NW–SE orientation that is similar to the results of stress inversion and to inversion from earthquakes in the Chi-Chi earthquake sequence. Despite criticisms of fault slip analysis methods, these results show that fault slip analyses from data collected along major faults, which have not witnessed multiple deformation events, can be valid. Homogeneous strain and stress states exist in the sense that kinematic and dynamic solutions can be found that fit essentially all the data, and these solutions have tectonic significance.", "note", "This dataset contains an appendix and three tables (xls and ods format).", "Coinvestigators: None Related JCU Research Themes: Industries and Economies in the Tropics", "<p>The 1999 Chi-Chi earthquake created a 100-km-long surface rupture on the Chelungpu thrust fault in Taiwan due to convergence between the Phillipine Sea and Eurasian plates. Fault slip measurements were made by several researchers from the entire length of the rupture directly following the earthquake and can thus be attributed to a single tectonic event. Conventional fault slip analyses are applied to these data and the results are compared with independent seismological and kinematic observations. Unlike many fault slip analyses, complications due to multiple deformations can be categorically excluded and the results can be evaluated from the seismological and plate movement data. Kinematic analyses of fault slip data that are weighted by displacement show sub-horizontal NW–SE shortening that is parallel to the plate convergence vector. A single fault plane solution satisfies almost all the data. Right dihedra and trihedra solutions also satisfy almost all the surface rupture measurements and give s1 in a NW–SE orientation that is similar to the results of stress inversion and to inversion from earthquakes in the Chi-Chi earthquake sequence. Despite criticisms of fault slip analysis methods, these results show that fault slip analyses from data collected along major faults, which have not witnessed multiple deformation events, can be valid. Homogeneous strain and stress states exist in the sense that kinematic and dynamic solutions can be found that fit essentially all the data, and these solutions have tectonic significance.</p>", "<p>The 1999 Chi-Chi earthquake created a 100-km-long surface rupture on the Chelungpu thrust fault in Taiwan due to convergence between the Phillipine Sea and Eurasian plates. Fault slip measurements were made by several researchers from the entire length of the rupture directly following the earthquake and can thus be attributed to a single tectonic event. Conventional fault slip analyses are applied to these data and the results are compared with independent seismological and kinematic observations. Unlike many fault slip analyses, complications due to multiple deformations can be categorically excluded and the results can be evaluated from the seismological and plate movement data. Kinematic analyses of fault slip data that are weighted by displacement show sub-horizontal NW–SE shortening that is parallel to the plate convergence vector. A single fault plane solution satisfies almost all the data. Right dihedra and trihedra solutions also satisfy almost all the surface rupture measurements and give s1 in a NW–SE orientation that is similar to the results of stress inversion and to inversion from earthquakes in the Chi-Chi earthquake sequence. Despite criticisms of fault slip analysis methods, these results show that fault slip analyses from data collected along major faults, which have not witnessed multiple deformation events, can be valid. Homogeneous strain and stress states exist in the sense that kinematic and dynamic solutions can be found that fit essentially all the data, and these solutions have tectonic significance.</p>", "<p>This dataset contains an appendix and three tables (xls and ods format).</p>", "<p>This dataset contains an appendix and three tables (xls and ods format).</p>", "The 1999 Chi-Chi earthquake created a 100-km-long surface rupture on the Chelungpu thrust fault in Taiwan due to convergence between the Phillipine Sea and Eurasian plates. Fault slip measurements were made by several researchers from the entire length of the rupture directly following the earthquake and can thus be attributed to a single tectonic event. Conventional fault slip analyses are applied to these data and the results are compared with independent seismological and kinematic observations. Unlike many fault slip analyses, complications due to multiple deformations can be categorically excluded and the results can be evaluated from the seismological and plate movement data. Kinematic analyses of fault slip data that are weighted by displacement show sub-horizontal NW–SE shortening that is parallel to the plate convergence vector. A single fault plane solution satisfies almost all the data. Right dihedra and trihedra solutions also satisfy almost all the surface rupture measurements and give s1 in a NW–SE orientation that is similar to the results of stress inversion and to inversion from earthquakes in the Chi-Chi earthquake sequence. Despite criticisms of fault slip analysis methods, these results show that fault slip analyses from data collected along major faults, which have not witnessed multiple deformation events, can be valid. Homogeneous strain and stress states exist in the sense that kinematic and dynamic solutions can be found that fit essentially all the data, and these solutions have tectonic significance."] Gold deposits of the Zimbabwe craton fascinator 41a70003a4127dff3794b5cb509e4be8 2019-03-15T12:57:38Z ["<p>The hypothesis that gold deposits in the earth are fractal dusts is tested using data on gold mine distribution in the Zimbabwe craton. Mine distribution reflects deposit distribution only indirectly because of undiscovered deposits and economic factors. Nevertheless, box counting shows an approximately linear relationship between the logarithm of the number of squares necessary to cover all mines in the craton and the logarithm of the square size between 10 and 60 km, indicating a fractal distribution. More detailed data from two areas within the craton have a similar relationship between square sizes of 2.5-20km. Departure from the ideal fractal relationship is termed 'roll-off', and is very satisfactorily by random sampling of a fractal dust. The results are consistent with the hypothesis that gold deposits are fractal dusts with fractal dimensions of c. 1.0 and the distribution of mines can be regarded as a random sample of the distribution of deposits. Making this assumption, regions that have been incompletely but randomly explored can be identified and distinguished from regions containing large subareas that have been completely unexplored, and appropriate exploration strategies can be devised in either case.</p>", "<p>The hypothesis that gold deposits in the earth are fractal dusts is tested using data on gold mine distribution in the Zimbabwe craton. Mine distribution reflects deposit distribution only indirectly because of undiscovered deposits and economic factors. Nevertheless, box counting shows an approximately linear relationship between the logarithm of the number of squares necessary to cover all mines in the craton and the logarithm of the square size between 10 and 60 km, indicating a fractal distribution. More detailed data from two areas within the craton have a similar relationship between square sizes of 2.5-20km. Departure from the ideal fractal relationship is termed 'roll-off', and is very satisfactorily by random sampling of a fractal dust. The results are consistent with the hypothesis that gold deposits are fractal dusts with fractal dimensions of c. 1.0 and the distribution of mines can be regarded as a random sample of the distribution of deposits. Making this assumption, regions that have been incompletely but randomly explored can be identified and distinguished from regions containing large subareas that have been completely unexplored, and appropriate exploration strategies can be devised in either case.</p>", "brief", "<p>These data were extracted from BARTHOLOMEW, D. S. 1990. Gold Deposits in Zimbabwe. Geological Survey of Zimbabwe Mineral Resources Series, 23, by excluding placer deposits. Data is available as an MSExcel spreadsheet (.xlsx) and as a CSV file.</p>", "<p>These data were extracted from BARTHOLOMEW, D. S. 1990. Gold Deposits in Zimbabwe. Geological Survey of Zimbabwe Mineral Resources Series, 23, by excluding placer deposits. Data is available as an MSExcel spreadsheet (.xlsx) and as a CSV file.</p>", "note", "<p>Coinvestigators: David J. Sanderson, 1) Department of Geology, University of Southampton, Southampton Oceanography Centre , Southampton SO14 3ZH, UK 2) T. H. Huxley School of Environment, Earth Sciences of Engineering, Royal School of Mines, Imperial College of Science, Technology and Medicine , London SW7 2BP, UK Related JCU Research Themes: Industries and Economies in the Tropics</p>", "<p>Coinvestigators: David J. Sanderson, 1) Department of Geology, University of Southampton, Southampton Oceanography Centre , Southampton SO14 3ZH, UK 2) T. H. Huxley School of Environment, Earth Sciences of Engineering, Royal School of Mines, Imperial College of Science, Technology and Medicine , London SW7 2BP, UK Related JCU Research Themes: Industries and Economies in the Tropics</p>", "note", "The hypothesis that gold deposits in the earth are fractal dusts is tested using data on gold mine distribution in the Zimbabwe craton. Mine distribution reflects deposit distribution only indirectly because of undiscovered deposits and economic factors. Nevertheless, box counting shows an approximately linear relationship between the logarithm of the number of squares necessary to cover all mines in the craton and the logarithm of the square size between 10 and 60 km, indicating a fractal distribution. More detailed data from two areas within the craton have a similar relationship between square sizes of 2.5-20km. Departure from the ideal fractal relationship is termed 'roll-off', and is very satisfactorily by random sampling of a fractal dust. The results are consistent with the hypothesis that gold deposits are fractal dusts with fractal dimensions of c. 1.0 and the distribution of mines can be regarded as a random sample of the distribution of deposits. Making this assumption, regions that have been incompletely but randomly explored can be identified and distinguished from regions containing large subareas that have been completely unexplored, and appropriate exploration strategies can be devised in either case."] ["<p>The hypothesis that gold deposits in the earth are fractal dusts is tested using data on gold mine distribution in the Zimbabwe craton. Mine distribution reflects deposit distribution only indirectly because of undiscovered deposits and economic factors. Nevertheless, box counting shows an approximately linear relationship between the logarithm of the number of squares necessary to cover all mines in the craton and the logarithm of the square size between 10 and 60 km, indicating a fractal distribution. More detailed data from two areas within the craton have a similar relationship between square sizes of 2.5-20km. Departure from the ideal fractal relationship is termed 'roll-off', and is very satisfactorily by random sampling of a fractal dust. The results are consistent with the hypothesis that gold deposits are fractal dusts with fractal dimensions of c. 1.0 and the distribution of mines can be regarded as a random sample of the distribution of deposits. Making this assumption, regions that have been incompletely but randomly explored can be identified and distinguished from regions containing large subareas that have been completely unexplored, and appropriate exploration strategies can be devised in either case.</p>", "<p>The hypothesis that gold deposits in the earth are fractal dusts is tested using data on gold mine distribution in the Zimbabwe craton. Mine distribution reflects deposit distribution only indirectly because of undiscovered deposits and economic factors. Nevertheless, box counting shows an approximately linear relationship between the logarithm of the number of squares necessary to cover all mines in the craton and the logarithm of the square size between 10 and 60 km, indicating a fractal distribution. More detailed data from two areas within the craton have a similar relationship between square sizes of 2.5-20km. Departure from the ideal fractal relationship is termed 'roll-off', and is very satisfactorily by random sampling of a fractal dust. The results are consistent with the hypothesis that gold deposits are fractal dusts with fractal dimensions of c. 1.0 and the distribution of mines can be regarded as a random sample of the distribution of deposits. Making this assumption, regions that have been incompletely but randomly explored can be identified and distinguished from regions containing large subareas that have been completely unexplored, and appropriate exploration strategies can be devised in either case.</p>", "brief", "<p>These data were extracted from BARTHOLOMEW, D. S. 1990. Gold Deposits in Zimbabwe. Geological Survey of Zimbabwe Mineral Resources Series, 23, by excluding placer deposits. Data is available as an MSExcel spreadsheet (.xlsx) and as a CSV file.</p>", "<p>These data were extracted from BARTHOLOMEW, D. S. 1990. Gold Deposits in Zimbabwe. Geological Survey of Zimbabwe Mineral Resources Series, 23, by excluding placer deposits. Data is available as an MSExcel spreadsheet (.xlsx) and as a CSV file.</p>", "note", "<p>Coinvestigators: David J. Sanderson, 1) Department of Geology, University of Southampton, Southampton Oceanography Centre , Southampton SO14 3ZH, UK 2) T. H. Huxley School of Environment, Earth Sciences of Engineering, Royal School of Mines, Imperial College of Science, Technology and Medicine , London SW7 2BP, UK Related JCU Research Themes: Industries and Economies in the Tropics</p>", "<p>Coinvestigators: David J. Sanderson, 1) Department of Geology, University of Southampton, Southampton Oceanography Centre , Southampton SO14 3ZH, UK 2) T. H. Huxley School of Environment, Earth Sciences of Engineering, Royal School of Mines, Imperial College of Science, Technology and Medicine , London SW7 2BP, UK Related JCU Research Themes: Industries and Economies in the Tropics</p>", "note", "The hypothesis that gold deposits in the earth are fractal dusts is tested using data on gold mine distribution in the Zimbabwe craton. Mine distribution reflects deposit distribution only indirectly because of undiscovered deposits and economic factors. Nevertheless, box counting shows an approximately linear relationship between the logarithm of the number of squares necessary to cover all mines in the craton and the logarithm of the square size between 10 and 60 km, indicating a fractal distribution. More detailed data from two areas within the craton have a similar relationship between square sizes of 2.5-20km. Departure from the ideal fractal relationship is termed 'roll-off', and is very satisfactorily by random sampling of a fractal dust. The results are consistent with the hypothesis that gold deposits are fractal dusts with fractal dimensions of c. 1.0 and the distribution of mines can be regarded as a random sample of the distribution of deposits. Making this assumption, regions that have been incompletely but randomly explored can be identified and distinguished from regions containing large subareas that have been completely unexplored, and appropriate exploration strategies can be devised in either case."]