About

Brett McDermott is an Australian medical graduate who trained in Psychiatry, and Child and Adolescent Psychiatry in the UK and Sydney. Apart from his JCU appointment, Professor McDermott holds other academic appointments: By-Fellow at Churchill College, Cambridge University; Adjunct Professor at QUT; Professorial Fellow at Mater Research.  From 2002-2014 Professor McDermott was the Executive Director of the Mater Child and Youth Mental Health Service (Brisbane, QLD) and from 2006-2016 was a Board Director of beyondblue: the National Depression Initiative.

Research interests include mental health systems of care with a specific focus on individuals presenting with depression, PTSD and eating disorders. Research designs have been varied including clinical (e.g. case controlled studies and RCTs) or epidemiological. A more recent focus has been the interface of clinical and systems biology.

 

 

Teaching
  • MD6010: Advanced Clinical Medicine Part 1 of 3 (Level 6; TSV)
  • MD6020: Advanced Clinical Medicine Part 2 of 3 (Level 6; TSV)
  • MD6030: Advanced Clinical Medicine Part 3 of 3 (Level 6; TSV)
Research Disciplines
Socio-Economic Objectives
Publications

These are the most recent publications associated with this author. To see a detailed profile of all publications stored at JCU, visit ResearchOnline@JCU. Hover over Altmetrics badges to see social impact.

Journal Articles
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ResearchOnline@JCU stores 68+ research outputs authored by Prof Brett McDermott from 1999 onwards.

Current Funding

Current and recent Research Funding to JCU is shown by funding source and project.

Townsville Health Service District - Study Education Research Trust Account

Tropikids Pilot Study: Longitudinal study of the social determinants of health and development of children in the tropics. TropiKids - an affiliate of the Mater-University Study of Pregnancy

Indicative Funding
$40,000
Summary
TropiKids will study the health and well-being of mothers and fathers and the growth, development and health of their children. The information will inform public policy and service provision, and advance our knowledge of the social and biological determinants of health for Tropical North Queensland. The specific focus of this pilot study is to test the materials and recruitment method for the TropiKids Longitudinal study, and to investigate in a tropical environment the associations between maternal and paternal characteristics (including stress), birth outcomes, and infectious disease in the first year of life.
Investigators
Kerrianne Watt, Linda Shields, Alan Baxter, Zoltan Sarnyai, Wendy Smyth, Damon Eisen and Brett McDermott (College of Public Health, Medical & Vet Sciences, Charles Sturt University, Townsville Hospital and Health Service and College of Medicine & Dentistry)
Keywords
Paediatrics; Social Determinants of Health; Epidemiology; Infectious Diseases; Risk Factors; Immunology
Supervision

Advisory Accreditation: I can be on your Advisory Panel as a Primary or Secondary Advisor.

These Higher Degree Research projects are either current or by students who have completed their studies within the past 5 years at JCU. Linked titles show theses available within ResearchOnline@JCU.

Current
  • North Queensland Adolescent Mental Health Literacy: A 10 Year Follow up (PhD , Primary Advisor)
Collaboration

The map shows research collaborations by institution from the past 7 years.
Note: Map points are indicative of the countries or states that institutions are associated with.

  • 5+ collaborations
  • 4 collaborations
  • 3 collaborations
  • 2 collaborations
  • 1 collaboration
  • Indicates the Tropics (Torrid Zone)

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jcu.me/brett.mcdermott

Email
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Advisory Accreditation
Primary Advisor (P)

Similar to me

  1. Dr Pek Ru Loh
    JCU Singapore
  2. Dr Carol Choo
    JCU Singapore
  3. A/Prof Claire Thompson
    College of Healthcare Sciences
  4. Prof Zoltan Sarnyai
    College of Public Health, Medical & Vet Sciences
  5. Ms Yaqoot Fatima
    Mt Isa Centre for Rural & Remote Health